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Brian Mark (Am, b. 1967)
Medium: 24k Gold on Stainless Steel with Powder Coat and Acid treatments. 

Brian Mark explores a unique area within surrealism to capture the a-ha! moment. Through his works, you experience the moment of the epiphany when a ghost of an idea emerges from the subconscious and comes into focus for the conscious mind to behold.
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Brian Mark (Am, b. 1967) is a classically-trained artist whose work can be found worldwide, including the Florence Nightingale Museum and Trust, the American Association of Architects, the US Embassy of the Ivory Coast, the Witt Family Memorial in the National Cathedral, Washington DC and for the State of Maine’s Houlton Courthouse as well as in many private collections. Mark recently chose to settle in South Portland, Maine after living in Costa Rica and Minneapolis.

ABOUT THE WORK

Brian Mark's art celebrates the "aha!" by capturing the moment of the epiphany when a ghost of an idea merges from the subconscious and comes into focus for the conscious mind to behold. His works are meant to be use as stations for reflection; as a way to slow down, look closely and look again from as many angles as possible. To see things in a different light and perspective one finds so many hidden things, (truths, beauty or questions) which are right in front of you. He finds this to be true with so many great discoveries in our world and wishes to give the viewer a different vehicle to provoke thought that doesn't shock or scream (something that he feels we have enough of in the modern world).

Mark's medium is a combination of precious metals, acids and extreme temperatures brought together. He starts with a drawing, then scratches and grinds the image onto the stainless steel panel to expose the metal. Next, he electro‐plates gold and silver or nickel to the panel, using up to a half an ounce of precious metal in each panel. He then adds up to a dozen different acids and heats the panel up to 1400 degrees F with blowtorches or cools them to far below zero with dry ice. This process activates the elements to create color and enhances the ground‐in images that ultimately take form. The end result reveals hologram-like figures and images which seemingly appear and disappear depending on their play with the light and position of the viewer.
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I just found out why this worked for me but most people said it didn't work. It's because I shared it to a community. So I was amazed, but then everyone was like "I don't get it", and I didn't understand why until I wanted to see it again, so I shared it again, this time to Public, and it didn't happen that time, so I shared it privately with a friend of mine and still nothing happened, then all it made sense. I read the comments on the original post, and most of the people were unimpressed but a few were all "Oh My God!!!" because most of them were sharing it publicly and privately, and it doesn't work if you do that. So you know that now.
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Sage, Sofia Bulgaria
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2013-12-18
3 Photos - View album

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Sculpture by Jonty Hurwitz
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PLEASE READ THIS!!!!!!!!!!!

ART LIFE COMMUNITY WILL BE SHUTTING DOWN PERMANTLY AND CONTENTS WILL BE DISPLAYED ON OUR GOOGLE+ PAGE "ARTNETICS".  ALL MEMBERS ARE ENCOURAGED TO FOLLOW US THERE.  WE APPRECIATE YOUR INTEREST AND LOOK FORWARD TO BRINGING YOU THE BEST AND MOST COMPELLING FORMS OF VISUAL ART.  THANKS AND WE ASK THAT YOU CONTINUE TO CREATE, INNOVATE, AND INSPIRE.

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by Steve Smith
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by Rene Julien
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