Stream

Join this community to post or comment
Pinned by moderator

Sai (saizai)
owner

Meta  - 
 
Community guidelines

Posts must:
1. be of academic interest to experts (i.e. someone already trained in cogsci or one of its related fields)
2. link directly to the original source material discussed (e.g. the actual research paper, not a blog or popular media discussion of it)
3. not be commercial (with rare exceptions, e.g. for companies' posts of actual research)
4. have comments enabled and not delete comments (summon a mod if there's a problem)

We've had a lot of posts lately that are of marginal quality, or are questions that a cogsci undergrad night have in their early years. Because of the breadth of the field, this is quite wide indeed, and dilutes the value of the community.

I'm adopting the same standard here that I did with the Computer Security & Lockpicking community[0]: for experts by experts, so that the signal to noise ratio is high for those of us who are in the field.

There are lots of other avenues for more newbie level discussion; this will not be one of them.

Current moderators are +Melissa Hall, +Michael Bernstein, and +Richard Law.


If you have any questions, issues with moderation, or would like to help moderate, please leave a comment on this post.

Sincerely,
Your friendly neighborhood community owner / meta-moderator

[0] https://plus.google.com/communities/111501683295752318891

ETA 2014-10-21: added "academic" to #1 to clarify.
39
Garron Longfield's profile photo
17 comments
 
+G 尉遲恭 I agree
Add a comment...

Alex Alaniz

Artificial intelligence  - 
 
So who will own Big Data thinking?
1
1
Black Rose Wolfstar's profile photo
Add a comment...

Clarissa Silva

Psychology  - 
 
Clarissa Silva originally shared:
 
We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them. -Albert Einstein

#tiptuesday   #realtalk   #lifelessons   #decisionmaking  
9 comments on original post
15
3
david moloney's profile photoRegina Martinho's profile photo
Add a comment...

Literature Scholar

Anthropology  - 
 
What if our ideals of what makes someone a genius is actually incorrect? These levels of "intelligence" we have designed for ourselves might have created limitations within our brains. Do you agree with this statement? Have you every really pondered, if there were limitations in all of our brains why might that be? I never really found the answer to these questions and I'm hoping you might have better sources than what I came up with. (Also if you have any claims that rejects this statement I would love to hear them.)

Please and Thank You! ^u^

http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/do-people-only-use-10-percent-of-their-brains/
1
Nikolai Varankine's profile photoBruce Mincks's profile photo
16 comments
 
And by "distinguished pattern" would you mean a "distinct" idea ("clear and distinct" is a big deal for Descartes) or a moment of experience?  Does something go up and down these columns in a pattern of some kind that can be correlated with intelligence?  Or do a number of columns do many things at once?  I'm no expert, but I also thought that epilepsy and/or autism had been explained in terms of such "agitation" in the brain--or the short-circuiting of such a process. It seems to me obvious that consciousness would exist in the brain in some limited sense, but a conscious subject can "get" ideas like infinity from simple Cartesian "extension"--from outside the body, at the sources rather than the start of the stimuli.
Add a comment...

Alex Alaniz

Artificial intelligence  - 
 
Some thoughts on what kind of machine learning tools AI will use, and who will own it from my Science2.0 article. 
1
1
Jen Yoeng's profile photo
Add a comment...

Mathew Wakefield

Artificial intelligence  - 
 
The 'Cognitive Revolution' was inspired by the methods and designs of computing and information processing during the 1980's. Can the insights from Cognitive Science, and specifically Cognitive Neuroscience inspire more effective digital logic for computers?

In this blog post I discuss how changes in our understanding of the brain can inform more effective and efficient models of information processing in both Cognitive Science and Digital Logic architecture for computers.
The mammalian brain, when considered in the terms of digital logic information processing, can be considered as a combined memory-processor. This idea should be fairly clear if you consider the ideas outlined in my overview o...
7
1
Mathew Wakefield's profile photoJen Yoeng's profile photo
8 comments
 
+Bruce Mincks​ The brain achieves the things your discuss (at the higher function cortical level) by parsing information through hierarchical memory structures from low level features into higher level objects via multiple processing pathways (e.g. what and where), which are integrated into a conscious percept when they interact with semi-independent systems that deal with other types of information (e.g. quality-value, and principle-context information processes) for the purpose of response coordination. The snake shape is processed unconsciously and automatically by lower level, more primitive brain structures and elicits and automatic response before you even percieve the object consciously.

Human logic emerges from the brain and our bodies configuration, and undoubtedly shapes our application of such logic to Artefactual purposes like IT and computing. They way we organize such concepts for those tasks arguably provides some insights into the logic that produces it; hence the application of computing/IT logic for the understanding of the mind in cognition. Now that more is understood about the brain and it's processing architecture, there is no reason such insights cannot be applied to improve IT as well. 
Add a comment...

Shreya Vijoy Kumar

Neuroscience  - 
 
 
okay can somebody tell how it is related to #starwars  ??
Imagine waking up on Mars, few minutes after lifting off the earth!
6 comments on original post
3
Hurol Aslan's profile photo
 
Good point; anybody recalls seeing Han Solo being thawed after a space jump?
Add a comment...

Pascal Priori

Psychology  - 
2
Add a comment...
 
Why do we get good ideas? And, in particular, why do we get good ideas in the shower? 

I spoke to a neuroscientist from the University of Bristol to find out more. 
For many of us our best ideas come to us in the shower. But what's the link between bathrooms and good ideas? We speak to a neuroscientist to find out.
8
3
BigBathroomShop.co.uk's profile photoSam A's profile photoCarlos Antonio Campos Nogueira's profile photoNikolai Varankine's profile photo
3 comments
 
These are very interesting points. Thanks! 
Add a comment...

Sophia Shakti

Neuroscience  - 
 
 
the scientists confirmed what Shaolin and Qi-kong knew all along. It is all how we train our brain, not the muscle. The real effect of training comes from the right conditioning of the brain.
A fascinating study proves that fatigue in endurance is nothing more and nothing less than quitting.
View original post
9
4
Julia DeFehr's profile photoJen Yoeng's profile photo
Add a comment...

About this community

Cognitive science (cogsci): a fusion of various disciplines, including linguistics, computer science, neuroscience, sociology, artificial intelligence, psychology, philosophy, anthropology, … In other words, we study thought, or analogues to thought, from many perspectives syncretically.

Przemek Gedek

Neuroscience  - 
 
So I was wondering, can someone comment? Thanks!

I just woke up and it made me wonder.

I had a dream that I was riding a futuristic crotch rocket around what seemed to be Philly, but then i got lost and tried to find my back on a non existing map, i got frustrated and woke up.

I was trying to actually see information on a non actual map.. My mind can't fill in information that it does not have. Same with reading, etc.

Are we going to be able to plug a Google API into our brains in the future so we can do a search while we sleep, look at maps, read a book? Learn something while we sleep?

Or is sleeping like running a systems check/debug and data is actually unimportant, rather that the system check ran (dream) and everything was functional?

Pardon, written on phone.

#dreaming #hijackdreams #future #science 
1
Add a comment...

Stephen Dewitt

Psychology  - 
 
My first blog post: David Marr, Cognitive Science and the Middle Path

http://thecomplexbrain.com/2015/04/29/david-marr-cognitive-science-and-the-middle-path/

If interested follow me on twitter:@thecomplexbrain
David Marr published Vision in 1982, and the work continues to influence research in cognitive science today. So much so in fact that Topics in Cognitive Science has published a special edition 'Thirty Years after Marr's Vision' including articles on the applications and relevance of Marr's work ...
5
Stephen Dewitt's profile photoJohn Hunsberger's profile photo
4 comments
 
np
Add a comment...

Callyn Villanueva

Neuroscience  - 
 
Trying out one of NeuroSky's applications (BrainWave Visualizer). It shows a graphical visualization based on brain activity while listening to a music. 
8
4
De Wet Venter's profile photoLevent Kayalar's profile photoGuy Trier's profile photoRik van Dinteren's profile photo
3 comments
 
I've noticed the same. It may be because of the bluetooth implementation (I use the mindwave mobile version). You may want to post that to the company's support forums. They pretty good in responding to questions.

As for other systems, wikipedia is a pretty good starting point. There's a comparison of several different systems.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_consumer_brain%E2%80%93computer_interfaces

Also this link presents a good discussion of some of the issues involved.
 http://www.intechopen.com/books/brain-computer-interface-systems-recent-progress-and-future-prospects/review-of-wireless-brain-computer-interface-systems 

Finally this article presents a pretty cool application of Visual Evoked Potential and a consumer level system - the Emotive system. On the Neurosky site there are a few articles about useing VEP's with their Mindwave system. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25108604

I really ought to get back into this research again.
Add a comment...

Anna Miller

Philosophy  - 
 
Noted philosopher John Dewey developed a unique perspective in regards to the concepts of life and learning by connecting philosophy and education.
Noted philosopher John Dewey developed a unique perspective in regards to the concepts of life and learning by connecting philosophy and education.
3
2
Bruce Mincks's profile photoJorge Casarez's profile photoGuy Trier's profile photo
 
The connection is "community" and "communication."  The problem with his philosophy is how he assumes shared values connect generations in the same motives (the "public").
Add a comment...

Agnese Mariotti

Neuroscience  - 
 
When your dog looks into your eyes: scientists found that dogs' gazing at their owners activates neural circuits regulated by oxytocin in both dog and owner that strengthen their bonding. It's the first time that a positive oxytocin loop is demonstrated during the interaction between two individuals of different species.
8
5
Pierre Albanès's profile photoGene Fox's profile photoYasin Gülener's profile photojeanzi szurgot's profile photo
 
Dogs are domesticated wolves and wolves have the social structure / interactions closest to ours (actually, the African wild dogs / Lycaons are even closer, but...). Homo and social Canids share a combination unique in the animal world : highly organized collective hunt AND the males directly taking part to the feeding of the very young.
Add a comment...
 
The 6 Keys..

How does the Stream-Enterer approach Nibbâna?
http://What-Buddha-Said.net/drops/IV/The_6_Keys.htm
How does the Stream-Enterer approach Nibbâna? Once in Savatthi the Blessed Buddha explained the 6 keys: Bhikkhus, a Noble Disciple who possesses four things is a Stream-Enterer! no longer bound to the lower worlds, fixed in destiny, with Enlightenment as his assured destination.
4
1
Gene Fox's profile photo
Add a comment...

Intellects

Psychology  - 
45 votes  -  votes visible to Public
Entertainment
44%
Time Kill
9%
Social Interaction
0%
Engagement
4%
Brain Stimulation
42%
1
1
Literature Scholar's profile photoChuck Adams's profile photoCatherine King's profile photo
4 comments
 
Seems to me anything that involves the senses that isn't taking care of a biological necessity is done to "stimulate the brain". Typically known as "fun"
Add a comment...

Sai (saizai)
owner

Neuroscience  - 
 
I'm just going to leave this absolutely gobsmacking abstract here. It's always fascinating when some piece of neurological architecture has been clearly press-ganged into supporting some computationally related but conceptually dissimilar mechanism. 

In this case, it appears that the same architecture used for processing physical discomfort is also involved in processing violations of conceptual boundaries. From the abstract:

The meaning-maintenance model posits that any violation of expectations leads to an affective experience that motivates compensatory affirmation. We explore whether the neural mechanism that responds to meaning threats can be inhibited by acetaminophen, in the same way that acetaminophen inhibits physical pain or the distress caused by social rejection. In two studies, participants received either acetaminophen or a placebo and were provided with either an unsettling experience or a control experience. In Study 1, participants wrote about either their death or a control topic. In Study 2, participants watched either a surrealist film clip or a control film clip. In both studies, participants in the meaning-threat condition who had taken a placebo showed typical compensatory affirmations by becoming more punitive toward lawbreakers, whereas those who had taken acetaminophen, and those in the control conditions, did not.
14 comments on original post
2
1
Sai (saizai)'s profile photoRafael Espericueta's profile photoTrond Arild Tjøstheim's profile photo
3 comments
 
+Sai "In both studies, participants in
the meaning-threat condition who had taken a placebo showed typical compensatory affirmations by becoming more
punitive toward lawbreakers, whereas those who had taken acetaminophen, and those in the control conditions, did
not."   Well, one  simple hypothesis one could test is that conservatives would become slightly less conservative after a dose of acetaminophen. Right-wing authoritarian personalities tend to be more punitive toward lawbreakers.
Add a comment...
 
Need help from experts :)

I am interested in the neuronal computation of beliefs on micro level. Is there a locus of beliefs in the neuron (nucleus or synapsis...) and where does change of beliefs happen...?

I am mostly interested in the epistemology of this topic. What can we say with today's technology and what kind of technology do we need to develop to be able to answer my question? :)

Both only on biochemistry level of the neuronal manifestation as also on the biophysics on quantum level in relation to this biochemistry manifestation.

If anybody can help with some link, I will be gratefull :)

TY all
1
Sebastjan Jeretič's profile photo
8 comments
 
my aim is exactly what You are pointing to.
I expect not the find the locus. because there is not one but the systems brings to existence the whole. so the process that brings the final neuronal network works as the whole, and not from a single locus.
and I expect that the search for such locus would show exactly that there is none
Add a comment...

Sophia Shakti

Neuroscience  - 
 
Tango it definitely works on whole brain
Dancing the Argentine tango could have potential benefits for people at certain stages in the development of Parkinson's disease (PD), according to findings in a new study by researchers at the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital -The Neuro, McGill University and the Research Institute of the ...
2
3
Carole H.'s profile photoOmar Bingo's profile photo
Add a comment...