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Sai (saizai)
owner

Meta  - 
 
Community guidelines

Posts must:
1. be of academic interest to experts (i.e. someone already trained in cogsci or one of its related fields)
2. link directly to the original source material discussed (e.g. the actual research paper, not a blog or popular media discussion of it)
3. not be commercial (with rare exceptions, e.g. for companies' posts of actual research)
4. have comments enabled and not delete comments (summon a mod if there's a problem)

We've had a lot of posts lately that are of marginal quality, or are questions that a cogsci undergrad night have in their early years. Because of the breadth of the field, this is quite wide indeed, and dilutes the value of the community.

I'm adopting the same standard here that I did with the Computer Security & Lockpicking community[0]: for experts by experts, so that the signal to noise ratio is high for those of us who are in the field.

There are lots of other avenues for more newbie level discussion; this will not be one of them.

Current moderators are +Melissa Hall, +Michael R. Bernstein, +Richard Law, +Science Whiz Kid, and +charles griffiths.


If you have any questions, issues with moderation, or would like to help moderate, please leave a comment on this post.

Sincerely,
Your friendly neighborhood community owner / meta-moderator

[0] https://plus.google.com/communities/111501683295752318891

ETA 2014-10-21: added "academic" to #1 to clarify.
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Dian Pink

Artificial intelligence  - 
 
The Age of the AI: Bots Are Getting Better At Detecting Our Emotions
http://futurism.com/the-age-of-the-ai-bots-are-getting-better-at-detecting-our-emotions/
The research lab that developed Siri, SRI International, is creating virtual assistants that can detet your emotional state, and react accordingly. It envisions assistants that can detect emotions and tailor their reactions to those emotions.
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Dian Pink

Neuroscience  - 
 
At Last, Google's DeepMind AI Can Make Machines Sound Like Humans
http://futurism.com/new-alzheimers-treatment-could-reverse-synapse-degeneration-and-stop-memory-loss/
Alzheimer's Disease is one of the most feared ailments in the US and probably in many parts of the world. The debilitating effects of Alzheimer's is too much to bear for the afflicted and for those around them. So, whenever new research provides insight to fighting this disease, it is always worth paying attention to.
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3 comments
 
I checked and that tagline...that was typed by the Futurism.com. their error
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Celine Son

Neuroscience  - 
 
For those who can't sleep right after using their smartphones/computers or watching TV, this could be a solution to your sleeping issues!

Summary: According to researchers, daytime light exposure may help to combat the negative effect blue light exposure has on sleep.Source: Uppsala University.The use of smartphones and tablet c
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Kenneth Guimond

Linguistics  - 
 

"The Ancient Greek Alphabet"

**************************************

~ an informational and entertaining set of progressive flicks on the alphabet pronounciation and even put to music ~

.......ancient, true, scriptural and biblical, and numeric equivalents in upper and lower case protocol and vernacular.......

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1FyEWbwBarQ

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=94B26pJM2fg

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZUrZHF_WBeI

**************************************

THIS IS MY VIEW~~~

"When studying linguistic, etymology, and philology, particularly in the advanced societies of the world, particularly in the developed Western cultures, it is apparent the Greeks provided a foundation of advanced thought and respect manifestation in many areas of dynamic progress. The roots and origins of many words are indicative of cultural values and apply to numerous dimensions of literal expression. The videos provided above can take you on an adventure to whatever depth may interest you. From architecture, to Sacred Scripture, to food, to daily conversation, to government and politics, to music, to mathematics, and the rudiments of science, to more than one can absorb in a glance. It is worth exploring for stunning enrighment......."

The Greek alphabet has been used to write the Greek language since the 8th century BC. It was derived from the earlier Phoenician alphabet, and was the first alphabetic script to have distinct letters for vowels as well as consonants. It is the ancestor of the Latin and Cyrillic scripts. Apart from its use in writing the Greek language, in both its ancient and its modern forms, the Greek alphabet today also serves as a source of technical symbols and labels in many domains of mathematics, science and other fields.

In its classical and modern forms, the alphabet has 24 letters, ordered from alpha to omega. Like Latin and Cyrillic, Greek originally had only a single form of each letter; it developed the letter case distinction between upper-case and lower-case forms in parallel with Latin during the modern era.

Sound values and conventional transcriptions for some of the letters differ between Ancient Greek and Modern Greek usage, because the pronunciation of Greek has changed significantly between the 5th century BC and today.

Modern and Ancient Greek use different diacritics. The traditional orthography, which is used for Ancient Greek and sometimes for Modern Greek, has many diacritics, such as accent marks for pitch accent ("polytonic"), the breathing marks for the presence and absence of the initial /h/ sound, and the iota subscript for the final historical /i/ sound. In standard Modern Greek spelling, orthography has been simplified to the monotonic system, which uses only two diacritics: the acute accent and diaeresis.
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Gaurav Nirala's profile photo
 
loved the post. thanks !
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charles griffiths
moderator

Artificial intelligence  - 
 
The problem of demonstrating that an AI can die, without killing it. Obviously applies to any one-time event, like human extinction.

"... survival in spite of positive probability of death actually increases a Bayesian agent’s confidence that it is in a safe environment.
We contend that these results have implications for problems in AI safety; in particular, for the so called 'shutdown problem'"
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IBM In South East Europe

Artificial intelligence  - 
 
Our conference is starting on Monday, May 30th. Here is how Dr.Nikolas Dimitriadis from University of Sheffield explains to public (12 min audio) about neuroscience and brain centric approach.

Our edition in collaboration from six countrees about the conference: https://plus.google.com/collection/Iu2vVB

IBM See BusinessConnect with speakers from Universities
 
The Brain Centric Approach

Listen to the interview of Dr.Nikolaos Dimitriadis with Darik Radio, Bulgaria. Dr. Nikolaos Dimitriadis, Development Director, Executive Development Institute, The University of Sheffield International Faculty, City College.

Darik Radio, http://darikradio.bg/, 4/05/16

#neuroscience   #behaviour   #neuroculture  
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charles griffiths
moderator

Artificial intelligence  - 
 
Another way to look at this is AlphaGo represents what general purpose hardware will be able to do seven years from now.

https://cloudplatform.googleblog.com/2016/05/Google-supercharges-machine-learning-tasks-with-custom-chip.html
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David Goddard

Psychology  - 
 
Hello all,
I am currently working on a 50+ page Literature review on processing fluency and truthiness. I am expecting to support a study I have designed for next semester examining processing fluency as the primary mechanism behind the production of the truthines phenomenon as described by Newman, Bernstein, Kantner, and Lindsay (2012).
I have the very few articles on truthiness currently available in the literature and am looking for as many strong/ prominent articles on processing fluency that I can gather to intellectually establish the link officialy. Seeing as none of the truthiness artcles outwardly states this as the underlying mechanism responsible I believe that both the literature reviewand the later empirical study an important addition to the literature.
If anyone could perhaps assist in any suggestions of important processing fluency papers please feel free to offer your suggestions. I am aiming for a min of 50 citations by the end so thought If i reached out to those better educated than myself I could broaden my range of articles.
Thankyou for any consideration you may give this, and I look forward to reading more in this comunity. I am so happy to have located this and the research being shared throughout it.
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AC PS

Psychology  - 
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AC PS's profile photocharles griffiths's profile photo
3 comments
 
+Adriana Pérez The idea that cognitive biases persist despite awareness of the biases? We're not always the kind of rational we imagine ourselves to be, making up our minds subconsciously and then inventing a story about conscious deliberation.

It would be funny if only it were somebody else.
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Sai (saizai)
owner

Neuroscience  - 
 
 
Interesting. Never heard of PPA before now. "[Joanne] Douglas has primary progressive aphasia (PPA)—a brain disorder that robs people of their language skills. Unlike other aphasias (language impairments) caused by trauma or stroke, PPA is degenerative: It gets worse, slowly and inexorably. But unlike other degenerative conditions, like Alzheimer’s dementia, it leaves most of a patient’s mental faculties untouched. People can still plan, reason, and multi-task. Their memories stay healthy and their personalities remain unchanged, at least at first.

But their blooming inability to write, read, speak, and comprehend can leave them locked inside their own heads, responsive but unable to respond, thoughtful but unable to share those thoughts. “It can be a truly devastating condition,” says Joseph Duffy from the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine. “It sucks our humanity, or what makes us uniquely human, from us.
[...]
It’s as if she has a daily quota of words—currently around half an hour of talking time, and less for writing. The disorder has progressed to the point when she can’t “have a significant conversation and produce a piece of high-quality writing on the same day.” And once the quota depletes, speech becomes hard and sentences start to look strange. Then, she lapses into silence and puts away any text, allowing herself to rebuild her cognitive resources.

So, Douglas carefully prioritizes when and how to use up her quota. “I’m always looking for quality rather than quantity, making the absolute best use of what I have, and not frittering away my very precious coterie of words,” she tells me. “I try to store up my reserves of language so they’re available for optimum use when I want to. And I spend most of my time alone fairly quietly.”
[...]
“My goal is always to be grateful for the abilities I have and use them to the best of what I can,” Douglas tells me. “The diagnosis makes all the difference to how I can approach the disorder.””
It's called primary progressive aphasia, and there's still a lot we don't know about it.
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Thanks for the info.
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About this community

Cognitive science (cogsci): a fusion of various disciplines, including linguistics, computer science, neuroscience, sociology, artificial intelligence, psychology, philosophy, anthropology, … In other words, we study thought, or analogues to thought, from many perspectives syncretically. Community guidelines: https://plus.google.com/+saizai/posts/bMUsxHXoPC6

charles griffiths
moderator

Psychology  - 
 
"Good communication between these areas would appear to be a condition for self-control. Our results seem to indicate that the tendency to commit an offence arises from a combination of a strong focus on reward and a lack of self-control. This is the first research project in which convicted criminals were actually examined."
In the latest issue of this monthly digest series you can learn why we're so good at reading, how the minds of psychopaths differ, why it might be time to get your kid off the iPad, and much more. The brain of a psychopath ...
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Roof Runner's Roofing Repair's profile photo
 
Interesting to learn.
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charles griffiths
moderator

Artificial intelligence  - 
 
Technology Review puts it in layman's terms, or skip to http://arxiv.org/abs/1608.08225 for some very interesting observations about deep learning.


The problem is that there are orders of magnitude more mathematical functions than possible networks to approximate them. And yet deep neural networks somehow get the right answer.

Now Lin and Tegmark say they’ve worked out why. The answer is that the universe is governed by a tiny subset of all possible functions.
Nobody understands why deep neural networks are so good at solving complex problems. Now physicists say the secret is buried in the laws of physics.
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illism's profile photo
illism
 
I'm sure quantum computing will open many, many doors in this area.
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charles griffiths
moderator

Artificial intelligence  - 
 
Many real-world learning problems are like searching for a needle in a haystack. 
This post gives insight and concrete advice on how to tackle imbalanced data.
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charles griffiths
moderator

Artificial intelligence  - 
 
Researchers have effectively trained very deep neural nets (over 1000 layers) by suppressing a significant random number of them during training. Previous attempts resulted in sharply increased training time and diminishing returns.
Abstract: Very deep convolutional networks with hundreds of layers have led to significant reductions in error on competitive benchmarks. Although the unmatched expressiveness of the many layers can be highly desirable at test time, training very deep networks comes with its own set of ...
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charles griffiths
moderator

Artificial intelligence  - 
 
Limitations including RAM size, bus, and feature size/clock speed may have put GPU training speed behind multicore CPU.
In this special guest feature, Rob Farber writes that a study done by Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine shows that code modernization can help Intel Xeon processors outperform GPUs on machine learning code. "The Kyoto results demonstrate that modern multicore processing technology now matches or exceeds GPU machine-learning performance, but equivalently optimized software is required to perform a fair benchmark comparison. For historic...
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Queary; what was the protocol for defragmentation of the RAM cores? 
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David Eraso

Neuroscience  - 
 
There's No Such Thing as Free Will
tl;dr:
“We need our beliefs to track what is true,” Harris told me. Illusions, no matter how well intentioned, will always hold us back. For example, we currently use the threat of imprisonment as a crude tool to persuade people not to do bad things. But if we instead accept that “human behavior arises from neurophysiology,” he argued, then we can better understand what is really causing people to do bad things despite this threat of punishment—and how to stop them. “We need,” Harris told me, “to know what are the levers we can pull as a society to encourage people to be the best version of themselves they can be.”

Recognizing this, we can dispassionately consider how to manage offenders in order to rehabilitate them, protect society, and reduce future offending. Harris thinks that, in time, “it might be possible to cure something like psychopathy,” but only if we accept that the brain, and not some airy-fairy free will, is the source of the deviancy.
Accepting this would also free us from hatred. Holding people responsible for their actions might sound like a keystone of civilized life, but we pay a high price for it: Blaming people makes us angry and vengeful, and that clouds our judgment.

“Hatred is toxic,” he told me, “and can destabilize individual lives and whole societies. Losing belief in free will undercuts the rationale for ever hating anyone.”

The big problem, in Harris’s view, is that people often confuse determinism with fatalism. Determinism is the belief that our decisions are part of an unbreakable chain of cause and effect. Fatalism, on the other hand, is the belief that our decisions don’t really matter, because whatever is destined to happen will happen.

Some scholars argue that we should think about freedom of choice in terms of our very real and sophisticated abilities to map out multiple potential responses to a particular situation… For Waller, it simply doesn’t matter that these processes are underpinned by a causal chain of firing neurons. In his view, free will and determinism are not the opposites they are often taken to be; they simply describe our behavior at different levels.

But we all may be better off believing in it anyway.
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24 comments
illism
 
+Sean Dali
But you wouldn't give your life up for no one now would you? Knowing that this is the only life you have why on earth would you choose to end it early for someone else..right? But then you don't know if that is a choice. ..must be evolution 😂😂😂😂
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David Eraso

Neuroscience  - 
 
 
Bayesian reasoning implicated in some mental disorders

An 18th century math theorem may offer new ways to understand schizophrenia, autism, anxiety and depression.

#Mathematics #BayesTheorem #ThomasBayes #Neuroscience 
An 18th century math theory may offer new ways to understand schizophrenia, autism, anxiety and depression.
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Tim Wesson's profile photo
 
This is equally fascinating and worrying. Fascinating that there are these deviations that non-typicals exhibit, worrying that the idea that normality is health will simply enforce normal biases, rather than seek the truth using by combining a variety of biases.

As long as we are equally critical of normal cognition, I am not concerned, but I do not believe that this is true of the mental ‘health’ system.
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charles griffiths
moderator

Anthropology  - 
 
An optimal level of procrastination to produce the best results.
 
How do creative people come up with great ideas? Organizational psychologist Adam Grant studies "originals": thinkers who dream up new ideas and take action to put them into the world. In this talk, learn three unexpected habits of originals — including embracing failure. "The greatest originals are the ones who fail the most, because they're the ones who try the most," Grant says. "You need a lot of bad ideas in order to get a few good ones."
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IBM In South East Europe

Artificial intelligence  - 
 
This is the IBM event on cognitive, scheduled at the end of May in Budapest. We publish our best unique content,  data, infographics, video, articles. Nao Robot demonstrations and we are planning live stream events too, healthcare related.  We have chosen to organise Google Collections, the two links below. Please, feel free to follow our collections ( just started) and turn notifications on, if you would wish to keep updated with our event content. Thank you for the opportunity to present what we are doing and admiration to everybody into this community. ( From The Page Manager) 

https://plus.google.com/collection/UaragB
https://plus.google.com/collection/M4BbgB
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