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Sai (saizai)
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Meta  - 
 
Community guidelines

Posts must:
1. be of academic interest to experts (i.e. someone already trained in cogsci or one of its related fields)
2. link directly to the original source material discussed (e.g. the actual research paper, not a blog or popular media discussion of it)
3. not be commercial (with rare exceptions, e.g. for companies' posts of actual research)
4. have comments enabled and not delete comments (summon a mod if there's a problem)

We've had a lot of posts lately that are of marginal quality, or are questions that a cogsci undergrad night have in their early years. Because of the breadth of the field, this is quite wide indeed, and dilutes the value of the community.

I'm adopting the same standard here that I did with the Computer Security & Lockpicking community[0]: for experts by experts, so that the signal to noise ratio is high for those of us who are in the field.

There are lots of other avenues for more newbie level discussion; this will not be one of them.

Current moderators are +Melissa Hall, +Michael Bernstein, and +Richard Law.


If you have any questions, issues with moderation, or would like to help moderate, please leave a comment on this post.

Sincerely,
Your friendly neighborhood community owner / meta-moderator

[0] https://plus.google.com/communities/111501683295752318891

ETA 2014-10-21: added "academic" to #1 to clarify.
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+G 尉遲恭 I agree
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Anna Miller

Psychology  - 
 
Our primal desire to impose order on our lives by resolving uncertainty and to bring the unknown into the light of understanding.
Our primal desire to impose order on our lives by resolving uncertainty and to bring the unknown into the light of understanding.
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Rebecca G's profile photoiPan Darius's profile photoGuy Trier's profile photoElizabeth Oropeza's profile photo
 
+Amber Petchey​ - learning how G+ works. 
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New blog post: Chess and The Clash of Civilizations

http://thecomplexbrain.com/2015/05/20/chess-and-the-clash-of-civilizations/
Several years ago I read The Player of Games by the late Iain Banks. In the far distant future, Jernau Morat Gurgeh, one of the greatest game players in his galactic civilization 'The Culture' is invited to travel to the distant and rival 'Empire of Azad' to play the most complex game ever ...
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Hmm, I remember I used to play "other" and with the most exeotic variations, just to get everone "out of the book" ...
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Joan Torelló

Philosophy  - 
 
The flow of thought, as life itself because it is also the flow of life, is unpredictable.
"Oh, how uncertain is everything. And yet within the Order. I do not even know what I will write in the next sentence. The ultimate truth is never said. Whoever knows the truth has to come. And talk. We will listen afflicted."
(C. Lispector)

http://languageofair.blogspot.com.es/2015/05/arabi-lispector.html
Ibn Arabi thought that the reality we perceive each of us is renewed every moment, 'the world' that we perceive is born again at every breath, he says, as we breathe 'the blowing of God'. According to him the air insufflat...
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Stephen Macknik

Neuroscience  - 
 
See the New Scientific Research On The Dress That Split the Internet in Two @illusionchasers http://t.co/OmiTniukzD #sciamblogs
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Anna Miller

Psychology  - 
 
Various studies have found a link between social anxiety and high emotional intelligence, empathetic ability and IQ levels
Various studies have found a link between social anxiety and high emotional intelligence, empathetic ability and IQ levels
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+Sophia Shakti some people just don't enjoy socialization and it's perfectly fine. everybody is different.
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The Foundations of Mind II Conference: One magisterium?
First call for papers/panels/participation
 
FOM 2 3105 Tolman Hall UC Berkeley Aug 13-15  2015
 
 
Confirmed plenary speakers/panelists include;
 
Stuart Kauffman (Systems Biology, Seattle)
 
Terrence W. DEACON (UC Berkeley)
 
Kevin Padian (UC Berkeley)
 
Walter Freeman  (UC Berkeley)
 
Henry Stapp (LBL, Berkeley)
 
 Howard Pattee (Binghamton University')  
 
Jacob Needleman (SFSU)
 
Menas Kafatos
 
Wolfgang Baer (Nascent)
 
Len Talmy ( U Buffalo)
 
Swami Prasannatmananda (Vedanta society)
 
Seán Ó Nualláin (UOI)
 
Beverly Stokes (Amazing babies moving)
 
Cynthia Sue Larson (Reality shifters)
 
More speakers will be added – we are also pleased to host members of the Biohackers and consciousness hackers communities in the Bay area.
 
Deadlines; June 16 2015; 500 word abstract and/or panel suggestion to president@universityofireland.com
 
June 28; notification of acceptance
 
June 1; Early bird payment of $200 at http://www.foundationsofmind.org/donate/  
The fee thereafter is $300 with $50 for individual panels. The conference is free for Cal students. An accompanying file specifies the major themes and these are the panels so far;
 
 
Living the Quantum Paradigm

3105 Tolman Hall UC Berkeley Aug 13  2015  10 am to noon
Chair: Cynthia Sue Larson 

This session invites interdisciplinary dialogue and exercises addressing the underlying philosophy and logic of quantum physics, and approaches to living in accordance with quantum principles. 
Questions about the nature of reality require inclusion of quantum physics beyond the historical “shut up and calculate” approach, which has provided multiple interpretations of quantum physics without agreement on the philosophical quantum paradigm foundation. Whereas quantum physics challenges scientists to comprehend whether, how, or where a boundary between classical and quantum physics may exist, philosophy promotes critical thinking and clarity about arguments, terminology, and ideas. Scientific philosophy can lead the way toward development of new theoretical approaches and alternate interpretations, while finding conceptual weak points in theories and arguments. 
Experiential approaches to living in accordance with quantum principles provide unique opportunities for appreciating the feeling of levels of consciousness and the dream-like nature of reality. In Vedanta, the body is a synonym for sensations and the mind for thoughts; both are presented to consciousness, the fundamental eternal reality. Yet exercises are also proposed to maintain this insight, which otherwise does not persist.
 
 
 
Session on ontology
 
3105 Tolman Hall UC Berkeley Aug 13  2015  1pm to 3pm
 
Chair: Michael Ranney
 
It is our belief that much grief, and waste of taxpayers' money, could be avoided with an appropriate reparse of nature that acknowledges there are rifts between the quantum and classical physical realities, and further ontological discontinuities at the biological and intentional thresholds. It is further our belief that the relative failure of the HGP, and imminent debacle of both the Obama and “Blue brain” neuro initiatives, are dues to precisely this unwillingness to cater to ontology. Moreover, even incessant crawling of the web has failed to yield anything other than at best mediocre results in machine translation.
 
 
 Finally, this tendency manifests itself in the social sciences with psychologism, the reduction of exigent social dynamics to cognitive and other psychological theories of how these forces are processed. This has led on the one hand to the non-engaged intellectual; on the other, to bewildering interpretations of postmodern thinkers geared mainly to giving instructors a free pass.
 
This session invites papers that address technical issues in science and the arts  under this rubric and/or consider the question of authentic political engagement. In particular, the latter category of papers may explore the fact that reality is relative to consciousness and yet transcends it, As we act, we become aware of being objects in a social space that yet can be magicked away in a classroom...........
 
 
3105 Tolman Hall UC Berkeley Aug 13  2015  3-30 to 5-30
 
In the absence of theory; return to Villa Serbelloni?
 
Chair:  Seán Ó Nualláin
 
Several decades before the HGP was initiated, a diverse group of scientists convened at Villa Serbelloni to tackle the troubling lack of theory in biology. The solutions they proposed were various, from an untroubling emphasis on hierarchy to a reinstatement of Aristotelian material and final causality to a network-based approach to the interaction of metabolism and genetic code. It is fair to say that the HGP to its cost – and that of the public who paid for it – ignores these guidelines. Is it time for a fresh period of reflection?
 
 
Session on Hacking consciousness; non-invasive probes into subjectivity
 
FOM 2 3105 Tolman Hall UC Berkeley Aug 14  2015  10 am to noon
 
Chair; Justin Riddle (Ph.D. candidate, UC Berkeley)
 
While a century ago dreams were regarded as revelatory of true psychic dynamics, a later generation took to drugs for that same purpose. A new ethos is stressing invasive methods that essentially involve consent forms being signed by patients already stressed by imminent surgery.
 
While the results of this has been mixed, the fact remains that there already exists an array of tools that can shape experience without the risks of drugs or surgery. This session will investigate these  tools,  like TMS and EEG, and their results. It will feature discussion of synchronized gamma and whether it indeed is the signature of consciousness that many claim it is.
 
1pm – close Submitted papers
 
 
FOM 2 3105 Tolman Hall UC Berkeley Aug 15  2015  10 am to noon
 
Submitted papers
 
12-20 conference Keynote ; Stuart Kauffman
 
The following is intended as a non-coercive guideline for themes for paper submissions ie other themes are welcome;
 
 
Title; "One Magisterium; a new science-religion dialogue"
 
Themes


A Magisterium is an area of teaching authority. As we celebrate the 450th anniversary of Galileo's birth, it seems clear that science has prevailed over superstition. The “new atheists" claim that there is indeed one Magisterium, that of science.
 
At first glance, it seems that science will continue its march to victory over the epistemological claims of religion, eventually reducing them to the null set. More consequentially, it is increasingly accepted among religious “thinkers” as among scientific such that the magisterium, the teaching authority, of science trumps that of religion. The result is a consensus that state power, based as it should be on natural law, itself a reflection of the natural order of things, will increasingly base itself on science.
 
The evidence seems overwhelming; on the positive side there are physical theories accurate in their predictions to a part in a trillion, print-outs of one's genome for a few dollars, a steadfast adherence to the notion that the mind IS the brain and that the brain is being mapped. On the negative side there is in the epistemological domain the clear absurdities of the biblical account of creation and the notion of transubstantiation, let alone reincarnation, and in the social domain the horrors of religious terrorism and institutional child abuse.
 
Yet things are now not quite so simple. It would be a pity if citizenship was reduced to following the dictates of scientists we cannot understand; yet its mythic poverty is not the only limitation of science. For a start, “science” itself means knowledge and that gives little clue that science reflects a set of practices based on a set of logico-mathematical insights and related physical observations, from which it takes its impetus; most of its practitioners are not versed in the philosophy of science and are not aware of the controversial status of theory.
 
However, that type of brake put on the progress of “science” may only be the beginning. The Victorian universe was eternal; the modern one features creation from a single point, rough-hew this how we may. Indeed, the cosmos shows fine-tuning of physical constants in a manner that leads to complex conscious creatures driven to understand said cosmos, all the while debating furiously how these constants came to be just so. The Darwinian biosphere was atomistic chance and biological necessity; ours features far-from equilibrium conditions like the gaseous contents of the atmosphere that facilitate our existence. In fact, man is right back at the center of things in a way no-one dared to predict.
 
There are many other issues that beg explanation along these lines; in fact, it could be argued that we have gotten good enough t science to become aware of its limitations. For example, Goedel DID point out paradoxes about cognition in mathematical systems and the puzzling ontological status of infinite sets that indeed suggest access to processes that are outside the Turing/Church realm. It also is arguable that the observer is still enmeshed in state-vector reduction, with attempts to dispense with him still highly controversial
 
Indeed, the hitherto “subjective” notion of information is now immanent in third-person physics, as the idea of code is in biology. As we explore in mathematical physics, we find that concepts like symmetry, far from being psychological mechanisms, seem almost to have a deus ex machina status, guiding us to ever deeper insights into nature. Conversely, in areas like quantum field theory, we sometimes do “bad math”, with non-converging infinite series, where any number could be obtained, and yet it works. Both subtle and devious is the Lord.
 
This is not an attempt to re-introduce creationism; it is rather an attempt at broadening the debate. We can continue along the lines above. Folk psychology, rather than eliminative materialism, will prevail precisely because it is a more effective algorithmic compression for most people than eliminative materialism and it is attested in its strengths and weaknesses by tens of millennia of human societies. People striving for self-development will passionately, head and heart together, seek through the intellect the ground of Being, and/or attempt to eviscerate the self through compassionate action/observing it to death, and/or attempt to change the world, if necessary through artistic creation.
 
We can call such activities attempts at “ontological self-transformation”, in the manner that James Carroll characterizes his training for the priesthood as requiring that he “ontologically” transform himself. We can then speculate how this this notion of “ontological self-transformation” might map onto evolutionary as onto scholastic thought.
 
 
All these activities exist in the broader society outside the academy – indeed several of them, like the arts arguably work better outside it. This allows us to introduce a critical distinction between different movements in society, of which the academic is just one. In fact, as of the early 21st century, the academic sphere is mutating its role in society so quickly that it behooves us to attempt a prediction of its role; the academic sphere will fall to whoever can attract the brightest and most free-spirited young adults to spend 3-4 years under their discipline. The web means we no longer need a physical premises; the paralysis of science in controversies about the status of the “gene”, “dark matter and energy”, the “central dogma” and so on means that the truth-seeking passion of these kids can better be satisfied without state funding that turns them into idiot savants.
 
So much for the academic “magisterium”; it is in fact mainly an environment for the pedagogical process. According to thinkers like Drummond, there is but one magisterium in society; it unifies the movements misread as “science” and “religion”; it invokes as its highest value the further evolution of man singular, and humanity as a whole; it accepts the political and scientific progress made since the renaissance, and embraces scientific discovery; it does not accept greedy reductionism aka scientism. While its community, culture and ceremonies are yet to be formed, the notion that something must be considered as sacred, be it the organic psychological development of our kids or the integrity of the biosphere, is accepted. It is also clear that the corporate destruction of our higher nature requires a reply, and that the political space still exists for both an activist and a quietist response, with much of the tools still available free in western societies.
 
 
Papers are invited which
- address any of the themes suggested above, whether agreeing or disagreeing – even if strongly – with the implicit and explicit contentions
•    address the issue of overlapping, singular, or no magisteria
•    address the issue of reductionism, failed or successful;
•    consider the issue of ontology;
•    contrast approaches to the fine-tuning problem
•    Address such controversies as the horizon problem
•    comment of the appropriateness in science of biology's “central dogma”
•    Propose mechanisms for macro-evolution, if necessary through code biology
•    Propose appropriate types of reduction, for example from Biology to physics/chemistry and from psychology to neuroscience
•    Consider the issue of truth, state power and authority in the space initially opened up by thinkers like Hobbes;
•    Consider the ontology of Buddhism as expressed in the Pali canon vis a vis its psychology

  Quantum fluctuations and God of the gaps for example what are  the implications of the quantum mind hypothesis if true?
  Lost and esoteric Christianities - for example, does Exodus 17:7 refer to an experience transcending Yahweh?
 
 
 
 
 
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My first blog post: David Marr, Cognitive Science and the Middle Path

http://thecomplexbrain.com/2015/04/29/david-marr-cognitive-science-and-the-middle-path/

If interested follow me on twitter:@thecomplexbrain
David Marr published Vision in 1982, and the work continues to influence research in cognitive science today. So much so in fact that Topics in Cognitive Science has published a special edition 'Thirty Years after Marr's Vision' including articles on the applications and relevance of Marr's work ...
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The analogy that comes to mind here is. That neuroscience
is trying to understand the circuitry of the motherboard so that we can work out what the peripherals do. However, the machine language requires software for it to operate. That interface level may correspond to the algorithmic level. If we want to understand that we need to look into ourselves consciously and decode the software. Psychological patterns are more relevant to understanding cognitive sentience.
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Callyn Villanueva

Neuroscience  - 
 
Trying out one of NeuroSky's applications (BrainWave Visualizer). It shows a graphical visualization based on brain activity while listening to a music. 
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I've noticed the same. It may be because of the bluetooth implementation (I use the mindwave mobile version). You may want to post that to the company's support forums. They pretty good in responding to questions.

As for other systems, wikipedia is a pretty good starting point. There's a comparison of several different systems.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_consumer_brain%E2%80%93computer_interfaces

Also this link presents a good discussion of some of the issues involved.
 http://www.intechopen.com/books/brain-computer-interface-systems-recent-progress-and-future-prospects/review-of-wireless-brain-computer-interface-systems 

Finally this article presents a pretty cool application of Visual Evoked Potential and a consumer level system - the Emotive system. On the Neurosky site there are a few articles about useing VEP's with their Mindwave system. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25108604

I really ought to get back into this research again.
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About this community

Cognitive science (cogsci): a fusion of various disciplines, including linguistics, computer science, neuroscience, sociology, artificial intelligence, psychology, philosophy, anthropology, … In other words, we study thought, or analogues to thought, from many perspectives syncretically.

Anna Miller

Psychology  - 
 
In this article, I will try to disprove a common belief that being an introvert is a disadvantage and will show you that it can be one of your greatest assets.
In this article, I will try to disprove a common belief that being an introvert is a disadvantage and will show you that it can be one of your greatest assets.
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Nice text
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Dagobert Doc

Psychology  - 
 
Once a day you can see the father's character at his son (Circassian proverb)

Einmal am Tag ist der Charakter des Vaters an seinem Sohn zu sehen. (Tscherkessisches Sprichwort)

Günde bir kere babasının huyu oğlunda görülür. (Çerkes atasözü)
 ·  Translate
 
Genes Influence how the Brain Reacts to Emotional Information

Your genes may influence how sensitive you are to emotional information, according to new research by a UBC neuroscientist.

The research is in Journal of Neuroscience. (full access paywall)
According to a new study, people who carry a certain genetic variation perceive positive and negative emotions more vividly.
2 comments on original post
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Sai (saizai)
owner

Meta  - 
 
Hello all. Community owner here. Spam content is a problem again, so again, clarification about the rules:

Posts must link directly to original, peer reviewed research. You can also include another link if it is a value add — e.g. an expert-level explainer, context, etc — but not link shorteners and not random blogs or popsci dumbing down.

Interviews (including HOAs) that are about expert level topics (e.g. talking about anything recently published in a peer reviewed cogsci related journal will count, as will academic-level interviews with people who have such publications), or other resources at a similar level, are also OK.

However, if it's something an undergrad in cogsci would be taught, it is not appropriate to this community. Neither are random musings, blog posts, inspirational quotes, etc.

Again, the first standard is: it must be of academic interest to experts. Please post somewhere else for pop sci or undergrad level teaching resources.
 
Community guidelines

Posts must:
1. be of academic interest to experts (i.e. someone already trained in cogsci or one of its related fields)
2. link directly to the original source material discussed (e.g. the actual research paper, not a blog or popular media discussion of it)
3. not be commercial (with rare exceptions, e.g. for companies' posts of actual research)
4. have comments enabled and not delete comments (summon a mod if there's a problem)

We've had a lot of posts lately that are of marginal quality, or are questions that a cogsci undergrad night have in their early years. Because of the breadth of the field, this is quite wide indeed, and dilutes the value of the community.

I'm adopting the same standard here that I did with the Computer Security & Lockpicking community[0]: for experts by experts, so that the signal to noise ratio is high for those of us who are in the field.

There are lots of other avenues for more newbie level discussion; this will not be one of them.

Current moderators are +Melissa Hall, +Michael Bernstein, and +Richard Law.


If you have any questions, issues with moderation, or would like to help moderate, please leave a comment on this post.

Sincerely,
Your friendly neighborhood community owner / meta-moderator

[0] https://plus.google.com/communities/111501683295752318891

ETA 2014-10-21: added "academic" to #1 to clarify.
17 comments on original post
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Anna Miller

Neuroscience  - 
 
New research has come to light showing that depression can change your DNA and change the way in which your cells generate energy.
New research has come to light showing that depression can change your DNA and change the way in which your cells generate energy.
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Stack Exchange reviews the complex and bidirectional relationships between measures, constructs and concepts as used in the cognitive sciences. First the basics, and then a more interesting, concrete example based on intelligence. Quite handy for quickly giving someone unfamiliar with the field an overview!
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Anna Miller

Neuroscience  - 
 
Apparently, neurons are constantly changing to adapt to their environment. In effect, neurons constantly rewrite their DNA as needed.
Apparently, neurons are constantly changing to adapt to their environment. In effect, neurons constantly rewrite their DNA as needed.
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This is called "Plain Evolution"

It is billions of years old.... plus more ...

Everything, evolves as existence evolves...
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Anna Miller

Neuroscience  - 
 
There are six main studies on consciousness, but it’s clear we still have a long way to go before we can truly comprehend the idea.
There are six main studies on consciousness, but it’s clear we still have a long way to go before we can truly comprehend the idea.
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I'll have to give that a read, given your review. I personally feel, with argument written elsewhere, that the ''double slit experiment'' shows group consciousness to be a reality. Light as a particle and wave is not a contradiction as it is the difference between the spatial and temporal, and yet there is this experiment and the only way to explain it is through a Schroedinger like group consciousness hypothesis. So I'll defo be looking out that book.Thank you. :)
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Alex Alaniz

Artificial intelligence  - 
 
So who will own Big Data thinking?
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Krystal Zhou

Philosophy  - 
 
Ants Are Not Conscious

Anthropic reasoning is a form of statistical reasoning based upon finding oneself a member of a particular reference class of conscious beings. By considering empirical distribution functions defined over animal life on Earth, we can deduce that the vast bulk of animal life is unlikely to be conscious.

Full Paper Link:
http://www.scirp.org/journal/PaperInformation.aspx?PaperID=27769&utm_campaign=google&utm_medium=lc
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Anna Miller

Philosophy  - 
 
Noted philosopher John Dewey developed a unique perspective in regards to the concepts of life and learning by connecting philosophy and education.
Noted philosopher John Dewey developed a unique perspective in regards to the concepts of life and learning by connecting philosophy and education.
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The connection is "community" and "communication."  The problem with his philosophy is how he assumes shared values connect generations in the same motives (the "public").
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