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The following four books can be found in the General/Mature comics section, now moved one shelf further from the staircase on the second floor.

* "Mush", by Glenn Eichler (writer) and Joe Infurnari (artist), personifies a pack of sled dogs and tells their struggles with communication, juxtaposed with that of their owner- a couple with a similar problem. The watercolor style is very nice. The writing is relatively shallow but serves its purpose for entertainment. It touches on ideas of evil but doesn't actually dig into it.

* "Fun Home," by Alison Bechdel, is the author's memoir about her father's death and how she grew from the intellectual grieving experience. The language in this comic is extremely literary, and it's thematically significant because both father and daughter read a lot.

* "Zahra's Paradise," by Amir & Khalil (pseudo names to avoid political prosecution), uses fiction to disguise real experiences of people living in Iran while the corrupt rules over the masses using violence and lies. It is a heavy read, heavier than "Persepolis" and "Dare to Disappoint", but that's to be expected because it focuses on the political struggle instead of an internal one. It does not claim to be unbiased, but tries to put things into perspective, and even give some opposition a voice. Sometimes it's difficult to say when a dictator anywhere orders massacre in the name of social stability, or merely to stay in power. However, mutilation of dignity has no justification.

* "Exquisite Corpse," by Pénélope Bagieu, tells a story of a young woman learning to no longer seek the attention of men in order to live. It has the European stylized art and sensibilities (when it comes to depicting nudity).
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"Ichi-F", by Kazuto Tatsuta (pen name), can be found in the General/Mature Comics section. It is 550 pages long, chronicling the personal experience of the author in Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant as a worker of the decommissioning process. The author is careful not to reveal proprietary or national security details, but he claims that the procedures, conditions and situations are as accurately portrayed as possible, even if it's subjective. His main goal is to present an on-the-ground perspective of the decommissioning efforts and the social situation there, so that people do not rely solely on sensationalized media coverage by those who don't even know what APD is. There are a lot of nuclear science terminologies and cultural terms that may be hard to follow for the average reader, but the story sticks closer to human side of things most of the time.
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* "Dare To Disappoint", by Özge Samanci, can be found in the Young Adults comics section. It is a memoir of the author growing up in Turkey through the change from a Secular state to a more Islamic-centric country. But the main struggle of the recollection isn't entirely a political one (though it's an added external pressure), but an internal struggle of trying to adhere to conventional wisdom as well as going against it. As someone who is going through the same kind of existential crisis but without a light at the end of the tunnel, it hit very close to home. The art style may be cartoony, but gruesome violent scenes are depicted. It's reminiscent of the comic Persepolis in its juxtaposition of the cartoonish innocence, and the harsh imposed reality.

* "Diary Of A Tokyo Teen", by Christine Mari Inzer, can be found in the Young Adults comics section. It's a travel journal for when the young author visited Japan for vacation- a learning experience of how to find her way in Tokyo, as well as the world at large. The art style is cartoony, but with a good use of colors.
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"Delilah Dirk and the King's Shilling", by Tony Cliff, can be found in the Young Adults comics section. It's the second adventure in the series of a spunky-wandering-paladin and her loyal-sensible partner in "crime". The setting is 19th century Europe, and this tale is mostly set in England, still during the conflict between the English and the French. This is a tale of vengeance and fighting for self-worth. The rhythm of the story is fast and action-packed. The art sells the action very well, and the color is gorgeous. The writing is fitting to setting and character, though may be a little tough on audience who is not familiar with the genre of historical fiction. It is also highly dramatic and wastes no time to make you hate a character if it wants to. The protagonist is more flawed (generally a good idea in fiction for believability/relatability) than the sidekick, but for the length of the book she is given enough time to grow on the reader if the reader is willing to appreciate her humanity.
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"Usagi Yojimbo" (volume 30), by Stan Sakai, can be found in the Young Adults comics section. Upholding honor is the main theme through these loosely connected chapters. The violence is stylized and mostly blood-less, but there are a lot of it in this volume, and some of the perpetrators can be quite vicious.
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"Bakuman" volume 19, by Tsugumi Ohba (writer) and Takeshi Obata (artist), can be found in the Young Adults comics section. It continues the struggle of a team-up between an artist and a writer to make it in the professional comics industry in Japan. This volume is a well-paced arc of the "quest for anime." It brings in logistics and some social factors that complicate their dream. The inciting incidents can feel slightly contrived, but the writing is tight and it is still great "edutainment" (that is nearing the finale).
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* "Avatar: The Last Airbender, Smoke and Shadow" part 1 and 2 (there are more), by Gene Luen Yang (writer) and Gurihiru (art team), can be found in the children's comics section. It continues from "The Search", where Zuko reunited with his mother. This episode is about old flames and grudges within the Fire Nation. Zuko has to defend his decisions as the Fire Lord, from people who love him in addition to his enemies. The writing is very fast-paced and tries to squeeze in backstory information to help readers catch up if they are not familiar enough with the lore. But I feel that sometimes it can get both tedious and confusing anyway (too much too fast, not enough breathing room), and that is coming from a follower of the original animated series.

* "Secret Coders", by Gene Luen Yang (writer) and Mike Holmes (artist), can be found in the children's comics section. It feels like a love letter to beginner's programming class. It reminded me of learning Karel Robot and Pascal in high school. The writing has Yang's usual snappiness and mischievous twists, paired nicely with Holmes' wacky cartoon style. But the story is barely there.

* "Explorer: The Hidden Doors", anthology edited by Kazu Kibuishi, can be found in the children's comics section. It is the third in that anthology series, and the theme of "door" is interpreted here in 7 short stories. The art is great (coming from industry veterans such as Johane Matte, Jen Wang, and Faith Erin Hicks), but the writings are shallow, constrained by length.
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"Usagi Yojimbo: Two Hundred Jizo" (volume 29), by Stan Sakai, can be found in the Young Adults comics section. Dedication to one's craft or profession is the main theme through these loosely connected chapters. The violence is stylized and mostly blood-less, but there are still a lot of it relative to previous volumes.
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* "Bakuman" volume 18, by Tsugumi Ohba (writer) and Takeshi Obata (artist), can be found in the Young Adults comics section. It continues the struggle of a team-up between an artist and a writer to make it in the professional comics industry in Japan. This volume has a fair depiction of triumph at a cost. The young start-ups have to learn repeatedly, that they don't know what they don't know. Ambition and youth will push them far, but sometimes they need to take advice from people who have already learned the hard lessons (e.g. time management).

* "Sing No Evil," by JP Ahonen (writer) and KP Alare (artist), can be found in the Young Adults comics section. It is a magical realism story about a young struggling musician trying to share the music in him with his audience. The art is gorgeous, and the writing is snappy, though the story feels trite (might depend on one's reading history). There are a few scenes in the climax that may be jarring and are too quickly glossed over, but perhaps they were meant as metaphors anyway.
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"Displacement: A Travelogue", by Lucy Knisley, can be found in the general/adult comics section. It is a memoir of the author's trying yet meaningful experience taking care of her infirm grandparents on a cruise. The art style is more journal-like and lacks paneling like in traditional comic books, but the ample amount of white space allows for clearer focus on the figures and the text. It has a melancholy tone throughout, and the "message" is bittersweet. For anyone who has witnessed the decline of loved ones day-in and day-out, this may touch a nerve.
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