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گنْ موقناً فالصبحُ يأتي مشرقـاً
من بعد ليلٍ مظلمِ القسماتِ

كنْ واثقًا فاللهُ يرزق خلقَه
لا تُذهبنَّ العمرَ في الحسراتِ

كن راضياً كن مؤمناً كن آمناً
كـــن راجياً كـنْ دائـمَ البسمــاتِ

كن كـ الشذى العَطِر المعطِّرِ غيـرَه
كن شعلة َالإيمانِ في الظلمـــاتِ

**صباح التفاؤل
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‏أسأل الله أن ييسّر لي ولكم جميع مانتمناه وأن يفتح ليَ ولكم ابواب الرزق من حيث لا نحتسب وأن يطرح في حياتي وحياتكم البركة والسعادة 💕
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An EPIC Eclipse

The Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR) was built to provide a distinct perspective on our planet. Yesterday, it added another first to its collection of unique snapshots. While residents of islands and nations in the Western Pacific looked up in the early morning hours to observe a total eclipse of the Sun, DSCOVR looked down from space and captured the shadow of the Moon marching across Earth’s sunlit face.

The animation above was assembled from 13 images acquired on March 9, 2016, by NASA’s Earth Polychromatic Imaging Camera (EPIC), a four-megapixel CCD camera and Cassegrain telescope on the DSCOVR satellite.

In this, the only total solar eclipse of 2016, the shadow of the new Moon starts over the Indian Ocean and marches past Indonesia and Australia into the open waters and islands of Oceania (Melanesia, Micronesia, and Polynesia). Note how the shadow moves in the same direction as Earth rotates. The bright spot in the center of each disk is sunglint—the reflection of sunlight directly back at the EPIC camera.

From its position about 1.6 million kilometers (1 million miles) from Earth toward the Sun, DSCOVR maintains a constant view of the sunlit face of the planet as it rotates. EPIC takes images using different spectral filters—from ultraviolet to near infrared—to produce a variety of science products. Natural-color images are generated by combining three separate monochrome exposures (red, green, and blue channels) taken by the camera in quick succession.

Situated at a stable orbit between the Sun and Earth, DSCOVR’s primary mission is to monitor the solar wind for space weather forecasters at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Its secondary mission is to provide daily color views of our planet as it rotates through the day. The satellite was built and launched through a partnership between NASA, NOAA, and the U.S. Air Force.

http://go.nasa.gov/1U58tzm
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الورد اليومي من القرآن الكريم صفحة 304
اللهم اجعل القرآن العظيم لنا في الدنيا قرينا وفي القبر مؤنسا وعلى الصراط نورا وإلى الجنات رفيقا 
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