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// In case any of you haven't heard, Dimetrodon has been discovered to have a hump that was about half as tall as its former sail; this revelation was made this summer, which basically means that every single depiction of Dimetrodon until that point in time is now inaccurate. Like this one.
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A dinosaur in Primal Carnage, which spit acid in the game series. I am letting the unrealism slide, because its just a video game, and video games should not be based on total realism, or else it MIGHT get boring after a while. But while saying that, theHunter: Primal has just come to mid, which has a large amount of realism in the dinosaurs, like the fact that they have feathers, and the Triceratops has quills, because a recent study has shown that most dinosaurs had feathers!  
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My second favorite dinosaur that's NOT a raptor, Compsognathus,
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The skull of my number one favorite dinosaur, Dilophosaurus, which I have actually gone to see this past weekend.
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Another one of my favorite raptor, other than Utahraptor and Oviraptor
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The name Oviraptor means "egg thief"

When the remains of Oviraptor were first discovered, by the famous paleontologist Roy Chapman Andrews, they were perched atop what appeared to be a clutch of Protoceratops eggs.
That's what prompted another researcher, Henry Fairfield Osborn, to name this dinosaur Oviraptor; adding insult to injury, he assigned it the species name philoceratops (e.g., "loves to eat Protoceratops").
 

...but it turns out this dinosaur wasn't a thief at all.

For a full six decades after it was named, Oviraptor was the poster dinosaur for egg thievery. Then, paleontologists discovered another feathered theropod, closely related to Oviraptor, that was fossilized sitting atop what were indisputably its own eggs. We can't know for sure, but the weight of the evidence is that those alleged "Protoceratops" eggs were actually laid by Oviraptor!

There's no evidence that Dilophosaurus was venomous...

The single biggest fabrication of the entire Jurassic Park series was when that cute, curious little Dilophosaurus sprayed burning venom in the face of Wayne Knight. Not only wasn't Dilophosaurus poisonous, but to date there's no convincing evidence that any dinosaur of the Mesozoic Era included venom in its offensive or defensive arsenal (though there was briefly some buzz about Sinornithosaurus).

...or that it had an expandable neck frill...

Slightly more excusable, from a dramatic point of view, is the fluttering neck crest that Jurassic Park's special-effects mavens bestowed on Dilophosaurus. There's no reason to believe that Dilophosaurus (or any dinosaur, for that matter) possessed such a frill, but this is the kind of anatomical feature that presumably wouldn't be well-preserved in the fossil record.

...or that it was the size of a Golden Retriever.

Just to round out the Jurassic Park trifecta: in the movie, Dilophosaurus is portrayed as a cute, dog-sized critter, but the fact is that this dinosaur measured about 20 feet from head to tail and weighed about 1,000 pounds. (To be fair, the Dilophosaurus in the movie may have been a juvenile, but that's certainly not the way it was perceived by most viewers!)

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A painting of a T-rex I made. took me about 5 hours
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