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Geffen Oren

Design Journal Entries  - 
 
Here is a walkthrough of my building if any of you are interested.
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Geffen Oren

Design Journal Entries  - 
 
Design Check-In 5:

Plumbing Systems are complete.  I have 4 major system types in the building: domestic hot water, domestic cold water, sanitary, and grey water.  Grey water is collected from the sinks and is then filtered and brought to a storage tank in the mechanical room.  This water is intended to be used to irrigate the green roof.  

I struggled a little bit with the plumbing systems, especially in terms of system definition.  It seems as though a lot of elements I have placed in my model are unassigned to a specific system. Some elements are also assigned to the wrong systems. When I attempt to change the pipes under the sinks to grey water for example, some of the sanitary pipes connected to toilets also change.  If anyone has some good insight on this, I would greatly appreciate it!
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Alissa C

Sustainability  - 
 
I realize the class has finished and thank you Glenn for a great class, maybe some will find this quick snippet interesting: 

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2015/mar/20/france-decrees-new-rooftops-must-be-covered-in-plants-or-solar-panels
All new buildings in commercial zones across the country must comply with new environmental legislation
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Alissa C

Design Journal Entries  - 
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Adrienne Johnson

Design Journal Entries  - 
 
Design Journal Entry 4:

Again-- congrats to everyone who is done! Like Geffen, I am also a bit behind... but the structural design is all done along with numerous architectural upgrades. Check it out on Glue!

The major components of my structural system are as follows:
Gravity system:
-W8x40 columns
-W16x30 beams
-12K3 web joists
Lateral System:
-Steel bracing (w16 and W14 as appropriate)
Foundation:
-12" shear wall in bridge
-Concrete footings

Fortunately, there weren't too many clashes, as I designed the architecture with a rectangular layout, and allowed vertical space for beams. There was some adjustment of the space programming to make interior walls (fortunately the program is not too strict). My back-of the envelope calcs allowed for the small W8 section columns, which fit neatly into my interior walls :)

Next steps:
-HVAC (radiant slab + active chilled beams)
-Plumbing (at least 1 bathroom)
-Lighting analysis and likely natural lighting improvements
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Alanna Dedek

Design Journal Entries  - 
 
Final Design Check-in
Architecture/Structure Model: http://a360.co/1GuDC5u
MEP Model: http://a360.co/1GuC6Au
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Bismillah Arif's profile photo
 
your design is really nice 
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CK Lee

Design Journal Entries  - 
 
Final Design Journal

I have uploaded the revit file and final presentation onto A360. 
Revit Link:
http://a360.co/1BYtz95

Final Presentation Link:
http://a360.co/1FH4Ffq

Below are some renderings of my exhibition centre.

Huge kudos to:
Jordan's imaginative integrated sustainable exhibits,
Irwin's cool light well and building which wraps around it,
Alejandro's walk through of his incredible sustainable compound,
George's amazing looking minimalist exhibition centre.

I really enjoyed the presentation by others and I am inspired to utilized by many of their brilliants ideas in the future.

CK
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Jordan Pratt

Models to Share  - 
 
Final Models, Presentation Slides, and Renderings:

Architectural: http://a360.co/1LhkpFu

Structural: http://a360.co/17iOzez

MEP: http://a360.co/1xgreXd

Presentation slides: http://a360.co/1GrwNSk
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Kevin Anderson

Design Journal Entries  - 
 
Check in 5:

Finally Done!

Plumbing and HVAC systems are all complete! I ended up putting a fair amount of effort into the detailing of both systems, and really like the way that they turned out. I do wish that I would have changed my floor plan and made the restrooms in the same place and orientation on each floor. Doing FIVE unique plumbing systems is not easy! But, after a little bit, it becomes fairly simple, just time consuming.

I also implemented mechanical louvers throughout the southern facing curtain walls. The idea is that they will rotate with sun every day and help to prevent solar gains. I discuss them in more detail in my presentation. 

After that I spent a while cleaning everything up for the presentation and the final model. Like most models, I think that I could spend about 20 more hours just on details. But with a model of this magnitude, I am pretty happy with the final result! The link to the final model is posted below. The final model was also uploaded to Glue. 

Thanks for a great quarter, everyone! It has been very fun and informative to look at all of your amazing projects! 

Presentation: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J03iZIgMgNs&feature=youtu.be

Model: http://a360.co/1CwiAG6
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Alanna Dedek

Design Journal Entries  - 
 
Design Check-in 5:

Plumbing and HVAC systems have started descending into the model. With time constraints, the rest of the plumbing and HVAC will have to wait!  The HVAC system focuses on the open floor plan, keeping the ceilings open in all exhibit and hall areas to showcase the building systems. The supply and return terminals are on the ducts themselves in these areas.  A mechanical room holds the air handling unit, and a small shaft to the floor below will allow Level 1 HVAC ducts to also feed into this unit.  One handling unit will be placed in each building wing. Calculations were performed on the individual spaces to determine the appropriate air flow for the occupancy. 

Challenges with the plumbing system were numerous. Unlinking sanitary from greywater and attaching all plumbing fixtures from appropriate views was difficult. Vertical pipes kept hitting each other, and I had to be creative with routing the sanitary system around the greywater. Fortunately, this space is the back corner of the kitchen, so having exposed pipes or losing a small area (enclosing it with drywall) is not an issue.  The greywater system will fill a tank and will be reused for irrigation during dry times. Rainwater, as minimal as it is in California, will drain straight off the roof into rain gardens and water the plants. 

To-do:
-Lighting system
-HVAC VAV boxes
-Sizing ducts
-Fire sprinklers
-Attach greywater to water tanks
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About this community

Are you having difficulties with any of the design software used in class? Or do you need technical help with your design model? Ask all questions here, and receive answers that will be available for everyone to view.
Stanford University

Geffen Oren

Design Journal Entries  - 
 
Final Check-In!

Since I never presented in class, I have provided pictures of my PPT presentation slides in this post.  You can also view my composite model here: http://a360.co/1FzjrUr. I also glued my model to BIM 360. 

Thanks for a wonderful class! It was great being part of this design community.
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Geffen Oren

Design Journal Entries  - 
 
Like Alissa, I realize the class has ended.  I wasn't able to complete my check-ins before the end of the quarter due to computer issues. Fortunately, I have resolved these issues, so here are the check-ins, 3 weeks late!  

Design Check-In 4:

For the HVAC systems in the building, I chose to go with 2 different system types: radiant flooring and a more traditional VAV with Hot Water Reheat Option.  

The radiant flooring provides heating and cooling in the exhibition and cafe spaces. To provide the adequate amount of outside ventilation, I have also chosen to supply and return air through ducts.  These ducts are connected to a DOAS that does not have any heating or cooling coils.  (In order to create the DOAS in Revit, I edited the Outdoor AHU Family Type by removing heating and cooling coils).  

For spaces that tend to fluctuate in terms of occupancy such as the seminar rooms, class rooms, offices, etc, I decided to provide heating, cooling, and ventilation through a VAV system.  This system supplies air through ducts.  However, in one part of the building, it lets air return back to the air handler naturally through the return air plenum.  On the other side of the building, I unfortunately had to duct that return air back to the air handler due to issues in the configuration of the air plenum.

On the second floor, I have chosen to hide these systems, mostly in order to provide acoustical comfort in the classrooms, seminar rooms, offices, etc.  Originally I was going to leave the roof exposed on the rest of the floor, but I didn't like how it looked aesthetically, so I decided to hide it under a plastic translucent dropped ceiling.  The idea behind this material for the ceiling is that it helps to allow light from the skylight to penetrate deeper into the building. Moreover, it semi-conceals the structure and MEP systems in a way that provides a nice aesthetic, reminding building occupants of the system types above them.  

On the first floor, I liked the aesthetic of the exposed ductwork and trusses so I decided to leave the actual ceiling exposed.

In addition to the designing the MEP systems, I have also run a lighting analysis.  My design was able to achieve daylighting levels necessary for a LEED credit in 2009, but failed for V4 (the lighting analysis shown if for V4).  I have also provided the heating and cooling loads for my building.  These values seem very high, especially because I worked hard to ensure that my building envelope had adequate insulation and thermal mass (I think something might be wrong since my Energy Analysis also failed to run).  
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Alejandro Gandini

Design Journal Entries  - 
 
Final Check-in:

Congratulations to all!
All of the designs were outstanding and reflect the great amount of effort we all put into this class. Have a nice break!

Final Model:
http://a360.co/1CGkrbe

Final Presentation:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QTQtfHs0_R0
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Alissa C

Design Journal Entries  - 
 
Final check in:
 
** Where it all began **
At the onset I wanted to integrate the building with the hillside. I intended to have glass features so visitors could see that they were underground. I wanted to integrate with the earth to reduce the heating and cooling loads of the building and to allow visitors to experience a space that is more in-sync with the environment. 

** Existing product **
Per my initial thoughts my building is integrated with the hillside. Visitors enter on the north side of the building and are led under ground via a glass elevator or curving staircases. The entry ceiling acts as a diffuser for exhausting the 2nd floor exhibition space and 3rd floor entrance. The layout of the building was organized to tuck away private spaces, allow for large exhibit spaces, and convenient classrooms and bathrooms. Offices are on the second floor off of the exhibit space and have their own bathrooms. The kid space is an exploration on how different glazings affect light and heat gain in a space. Each classroom has a special daylighting element or trombe wall so that the classroom itself is a part of the learning experience. Another trombe wall can be found along the south side of the 1st floor exhibition space. The building is constructed from CMU and brick with concrete subfloors to ensure a lot of thermal mass to help with heating and cooling. It has radiant floors and a ventilation / exhaust system. Plus a cool roof.

** Design feature highlights **
> Radiant floors with manifolded system & heat pump connections
> Grey water toilet flushing system 
> Trombe walls 
> Light shelves 
> Pop-up roof and slanted skylight wells with reflective coating along interior
> Glass stair wells and elevator wells to let daylight pass through space 
> Displacement ventilation 
> Linen plenum 

** Analysis that guided the way **
I wanted to use the hillside for thermal mass and protection from the winter winds. Attached are photos showing how wind interacts with my building. The hill does a good job to reduce wind on site. 

I made efforts to get daylight into the building. However, I was in the end thwarted by the depth of my submerged floor plate. While the 2nd floor is completely daylit and presumably the 3rd floor (Revit had trouble running the analysis), the 1st floor is partially daylit.

Initial energy analysis showed that a lot of loss occurred through the windows. As a result the windows on each building face have been given specific glazings. For the south I have windows that reduce heat and light. For the north and trombe walls clear glazings. For the east and west tinted glazing with shading.

** Design snags **
Radiant floor plumbing coordination with flooring -- the floors are laid to cover the pipes yet plumbing the pipes into mechanical equipment and then trying to change their offset upset Revit

A solar light tube model was created, however I did not have enough dead space in my walls to run the shaft. 

Going from conceptual mass layout to building and then rearranging my layout led to a very deep and long main building. In hindsight I would have divided my space among more floors or more joined buildings. Yet I find the conceptual mass process very useful when layout out space.  

My understanding of structural modeling grew over the course of the project. However, I would have spent less time on that model and more on HVAC in another iteration. I am proud of how my concrete and wood structures have turned out. Also I would ensure my floor to floor height is taller so that I can better coordinate MEP and structures. Currently the systems will clash. 

** Future work **
- Create functional heat recovery scheme 
- Implement solar chimney on kid zone for cooling
- Incorporate all of the HVAC systems - separate AHU for bathrooms and kitchen to handle significant kitchen loads and bathroom exhausting needs 
- Modify architectural plan to better place conference rooms and continue to adjust for optimal 1st floor daylighting 

** Lessons learned ** 
- Ensure plumbing is properly placed before connecting into mechanical equipment 
- Linking models depends on using the same linked file and not changing that file's name 
- Use grid at the start of architectural layout to make structural easier and to be aware of floor plate depths 
- Use large features where you want to highlight designs
- Successfully used room schedules to calculate occupancy loads, cfm, and needed egress dimensions
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Geffen Oren

Design Journal Entries  - 
 
Design Check In 4:

Congrats to everyone that has finished their projects! I'm a little behind as you can see, but hopefully I'll be finishing soon.  I have finally completed my structure. Now onto MEP!

Although I have a fairly rectangular building, it was actually quite difficult making the structure.  I surprising had a significant amount of coordination issues, which is strange given that I am the architect and structural engineer for this building.  Namely, I struggled to create a grid and had to move a number of beams and walls so that the structure aligned well with the architecture.

Making things more challenging, I did not want to columns in the interior of my spaces.  As a result, I decided to go with a steel truss system in the large open span spaces and smaller beam systems in the office areas and seminar rooms.  The trusses are 3 feet deep and span between 25 and 35 feet.  On the bottom floor, they connect right into the retaining (structural) walls to make efficient use of the concrete.  

I also used a truss system to support the large skylight in my building (see the second floor where there is a large opening in the structure).  The trusses supporting this skylight have a larger depth to account for their longer spans.  

Next steps:
I now need to link in my structural model into the architectural model as well as finish up MEP systems. I also have been having issues with my lighting analysis.  I would like to get that running as well as perform a more in depth energy analysis on the building. If I have time, I would also like to model a specific room in CFD.
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George Venetsanopoulos

Models to Share  - 
 
I uploaded a zip file that includes the model, the presentation file and various panoramic html views!
Thanks!
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Jordan Pratt

Design Journal Entries  - 
 
Design Journal Entry 5:

I've spent the last few weeks putting the finishing touches on the HVAC and plumbing systems. There are 3 different system types that make up the HVAC sytem between the two buildings.

1) A radiant floor heating a cooling system on the 1st floor of the south building

2) A water source heat pump system that delivers conditioned air for heating cooling and ventilation to both the 1st and 2nd floors of the South Building (back up heating/cooling and ventilation only on 1st floor as it is conditioned primarily by the radiant floor system)

3) A typical rooftop air handler and VAV system on the 1st and 2nd floors of the North building.

The plumbing system really only considers the hot water / cold water and sanitary system to the 6 bathrooms. (No grey water or fire protection system)
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Nanyu Zhao

Design Journal Entries  - 
 
All the posts I missed…

First, here are some videos I found useful/interesting during this class and 328
Ecotect Analysis/Green Building Studio - Finding the Optimum Building Orientation
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G_9uJt-DOGY
Revit Tips - Curved Curtain Wall
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hAs235c2uuM
Revit Tips - Railing in Frozen (Let it go)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hha_mUxQWpI&index=1&list=PLQMW6EuQeQZNPPeMaAJ_34BTO4Ssu-sIC
buildz: Repeat and Divide Prt I: curved panels
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=POND315utnY
Repeat and Divide Prt III: Slats and Continuous Slices
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zg-KStl3wuk&list=UUgQXpHMio757XvhJUizcXyA

The rest is about the problems I still can’t fix for my building (which could use as a writing copy of my virtual presentation)

1, roof panels
I couldn’t find an easy way to create roof panels (and be able to change panel layers easily)
Solution (?)
Create mass roof with multiple small faces (which will not work on rounded curve)
Use dynamo to add adaptive panels (those panels don’t work in flow analysis)

2, daylight analysis
Only works when I give glass a color of 255 (daylight will think it as full clear), could not make it to work on semi-clear panels
Solution (?)
Change glass layer thickness (?)

3, Duct sizing
Use VAV box and ceiling return to reduce the cfm in supply air ducts, still the sizing seems large
Solution (?)
Wrong ACR calculation (?)
Dropped ceiling (less preferred)
Separate air handler unit (uncommon for 15,000 sf building) 

4, Ceiling return
I don’t know if this part is modeled correctly

5, Courtyard pool
Could potentially serve as gray water tank

Models & PPT & Video are uploaded in Google Drive
https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B-_iWIgyi82ALUc5ZXpfWXhUN1k/view?usp=sharing
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Xiao Chen

Design Journal Entries  - 
 
6th check in 

please see the file on A360 shared repository. 

http://a360.co/1BjLhig
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