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"Lake Baikal in eastern Siberia is the oldest freshwater lake on Earth, and one of the largest and deepest, containing around one-fifth of the world's freshwater. In winter, it freezes over, and these beautiful transparent, turquoise masses of broken ice appear momentarily in March, caused by the unequal structure, temperature and pressure in the main body of the packed ice."
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oO Galactic Pac Man! :D 
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It's the hardships that we face in life that mold us into the jewels that we become.
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Read about anticipated new features and public preview release date of Windows Blue - the upcoming next version of windows 8.

5 Advantages of Masturbation:

1) It prevents cancer. A 2003 Australian study found that men who ejaculated more than five times a week were a third less likely to develop prostate cancer..

2) It makes you harder. As you age, you naturally lose muscle tone, even down there. Masturbation works out your pelvic floor muscles to prevent erectile dysfunction and incontinence.

3) It helps you last longer. Taking yourself to palm prom may help you stretch your sack sessions. 

4) It ups your immunity. Ejaculation increases levels of the hormone cortisol, says Jennifer Landa, M.D., a specialist in hormone therapy. Cortisol, which usually gets a bad rap as a havoc-wrecking stress hormone, actually helps regulate and maintain your immunity in the small doses. “Masturbation can product the right environment for a strengthened immune system,” she says.

5) It boosts your mood. Masturbating releases a slew of feel-good neurochemicals like dopamine and oxytocin that lift your spirits, boost your satisfaction, and activate the reward circuits in your brain. “A brain scan of someone having an orgasm looks like a heroin addicts.”

http://news.menshealth.com/masturbate-every-day/2011/12/29/

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Lighting responsibly is not about turning off all of your lights and plunging into darkness and chaos. Instead, it is about using the lights you have in the most effective way possible. There are a few easy steps you can take to light responsibly; helping to protect the nighttime environment, our own health and well-being, as well as opening up the sky for the stars to shine through.

First, put the light where it gets used. Put covers or shields on the top of lights so that all of the light goes down on the ground where it is useful rather than shining it up into the sky. This will also cut glare and make it easier for your eyes to see in the dark (after all, our eyes are meant to function perfectly well with the light equivalent to a full moon).

Second, because you’re aiming all of the light down on the ground there’s that much more light where you need it. Since it is now brighter on the ground you can actually use a lower wattage light bulb and achieve the same brightness you had when the light was being wasted in other directions. This saves energy and helps the environment!

Third, use light that wildlife is not attracted to, such as red or orange light. If you’ve ever looked at a bright white light you’ll see many insects around the light because they’re drawn to it. Most insects and animals are drawn to red or orange light much less than bright white light. This light can disturb their sleep patterns, mating, eating, and even reveal them to predators more than normal.

Using these three easy steps you can provide a lit environment that isn’t wasting light or hurting the nighttime environment. Using timers, dimmers, and motion sensors can also be a great help to lighting only when you need it, where you need it. Help us bring about a darker, yet more ‘enlightened’ world by using light responsibly. You won’t regret the view.

Learn more about International Dark Sky Week at International Dark-Sky Association ♥ 
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If this video doesn't make your day... then i'd recommend checking whether u're still human or not...

Students of business and marketing from USJ have a project about “Gay marketing” and they want our help with filling the online survey. 
- For the English version:
http://www.surveycrest.com/survey/gaymktglebanon

- For the French version:
http://www.surveycrest.com/survey/gaymktgliban

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which wolf are you feeding?
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Clash of the Celestial Space Beasts!

When you are laying outstretched on your back, staring into the sunny blue sky on a cloudy day, are you one of those people that see faces, shapes, animals, or other objects in the clouds? I think most of us have see such things... it's one of the joys of childhood. However, did you know there is actually a word for this phenomenon? It's called "pareidolia."

The word itself is derived from the Greek words 'para,' (meaning something faulty) and eidōlon (meaning image, form, or shape) and is a form of Apophenia, which means "seeing meaningful patterns or connections in random or meaningless data." Except in this case, the patterns seen are fictitious.

This phenomena is responsible for the so-called "man in the moon," the cydonia face on mars, the (ridiculous, yet hilarious) "cheesus" found in a bag of cheetos, and (famously) the ten year old grilled cheese sandwich that supposedly contained the face of Jesus...which was eventually sold on ebay for a staggering $28,000 in 2004.

Carl Sagan once postulated in his book "The Demon-Haunted World – Science as a Candle in the Dark," that this (seeing human faces in unrelated patterns) was likely engrained in humans at birth through millions of years of evolution, when it became necessary to discern between friends and foes during an earlier period when it could have been life or death for us. Furthermore, he argued that being able to use contextual clues to put together human faces from a distance and in poor visibility is an evolutionary advantage for humans, but that is still highly debated.

With that said, I personally have a propensity for seeing crazy space monsters in deep space images. Most of the starforming regions are filled with so many colors and so much complexity, the faces sometimes jump straight out to me. Judging from the image attached to this article, I'm not the only one. Chris Keegan, a professional illustrator, took some images captured by the Hubble Space Telescope, and manipulated them just a bit to make the celestial beasts pop out.

This image is my favorite out of the bunch, the manipulated version of the Cone nebula, a celestial region located some 2,500 light-years from Earth in the constellation of Monoceros. It is a small part of the larger star forming region designated as NGC 2264. The column itself, which is composed primarily of cold gas, is quite large ( it extends a full 2.5 light-years in space, making it about 65 times larger than the diameter of our solar system!).

You can see the original, unedited image here: http://www.spacetelescope.org/images/heic0206c/

So next time an apparition of the virgin Mary pays you a visit on your morning slice of toast, just remember, it's just bread. Not a divine sign. We humans have a tendency to find patterns in just about anything and everything!
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