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WELCOME!

Welcome to "Outdoors with Open Hearts," a community for individuals coping with heart surgery while maintaining an active, outdoor lifestyle.

If you look to the lefthand side of the page, you will see more information about this community and who we are.

As a member of this community, it would be great if you could start off with a brief introduction to yourself. In order to do this, write a short bio and post it to this community.

In addition to a short introduction to who you are, also make sure to include:
What activities do you most enjoy?
What condition led to your need for a heart surgery?
What kind of surgery did you or will you receive?
How was your transition back into your active lifestyle?

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Rock Climbing in South Dakota 2 1/2 years after open heart. Still struggling with endurance but as long as I paced myself I did OK. Has anyone else experience this? Am I expecting to much?Anyway, feels so great to be outdoors and to be active. Before surgery I could hardly walk a flight of steps or walk across a parking lot.
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10/15/18
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Hey y'all,
One thing that I really struggled with after surgery was my recovery timeline.

What did your recovery and return to activities look like? How much time passed before you were as active as you were before surgery?

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After my heart surgeries, becoming strong again in sport climbing/ bouldering was super important to me. I got my strength back and climbed harder than I ever had in my life. Then something funny happened. I stopped climbing and took up other interests. I burnt myself out on it. It felt like I was trying to prove something. It wasn't fun anymore. Perhaps I'll get back into it, but for now I still cycle, hike, backpack, and weight-lift. Below is a shot of me climbing a V4 in joshua tree called yabba dabba dont
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Hi guys, about two years ago I had an aortic valve replacement with a ascending aorta, aortic arch and carotid artery grafting due to a congenital heart defect. Prior to my surgery I was doing weightlifting and yoga training. Following my surgery I knew that I had to give 110% to my recovery. I immediately began pacing the hospital hallways. I dressed myself daily and used a large shawl to hide the chest tubes and central lines. Most of the time the doctors and nurses couldn't locate me because I would sit in the visitors lounge to socialize instead of being in a hospital bed. I just figured if I didn't look or feel sick that I would come out just fine. I became one of the ICUs quickest patients to be discharged.
It was a tough first year as my cardiac rate control medication really slowed me down and I suffered from chronic anemia. I have now bounced back for this second year coming off my heavier cardiac meds and stable blood levels. I finally feel like I have all my endurance and strength back. I love the fact that I can now hike up hills and walk through sandy beaches without being short of breath. I have begun doing light weight lifting and basic yoga practices. I'm looking forward to doing some zip lining soon.
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10/19/17
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Introduction:
My name is Bob. I am originally from the Philadelphia area of PA, but currently live in Denver CO. I teach English to high school students and I am an avid rock climber. I have been climbing as much as possible since 2011.

When I was born, I had a bicuspid Aortic Valve and Aortic Stenosis. One June 1, 2016, I had an open heart surgery to repair this condition. In order to correct my condition, I received an On-X heart Valve with an attached Ascending Aortic Prothesis .

After surgery, I was given a timeline from my doctor that said my recovery time would be anywhere from 6 months to a year. He believed that I would not be able to climb for a full year, just due to the trauma of the thoracic surgery and the long term effects of the anesthesia. After our 5 week check up, he said that at that point, I could technically start climbing again, since I could no longer injure my sternum. I took that as an invitation and the next week, just 6 weeks pos-op, I was climbing a 1000' face in the Flatirons of Boulder Colorado.

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This guy is great inspiration to be active after heart surgery!

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Life on Coumadin:
"Regular physical activity is associated with higher warfarin dose requirements and lower risk of hemorrhage."

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