Stream

Join this community to post or comment

Sullivan tucker (sock)

» ­Discussion  - 
 
im not a mod but my community is freaking out cause someone is kicking moderates out  
2
John R. Ellis's profile photoPeter van Rens's profile photo
28 comments
 
+John R. Ellis it's as I thought
Add a comment...
 
I propose a "Plus1 Day" where every +1'd post is automatically shared to the users wall. As in everyone couldn't +1 a post without sharing it, publically, and/or to all of their circles. I know this would create a different beast of a google+ for 24 hours, and would allow an amazing viralism upsurge of new content for everyone.

Any thoughts?

#widgets #circleshare
2
Jason Wade Howard's profile photo
13 comments
 
On the same day you remove the ability to do it Caleb... do keep up.
Add a comment...

Akwardable Mink

» ­Discussion  - 
 
ive had a moderator for two weeks and I still cant promote him to owner its been two weeks since he was moderator
1
wavebraker™'s profile photoJohn R. Ellis's profile photo
2 comments
 
If it's been exactly two weeks, then it's probably just a time zone issue - give it another day.  I assume you are getting the error message that you have to wait 2 weeks.  Just keep trying.  
Add a comment...
 
Here is the main thing that motivates me (and I'm sure many others) to join a new Google Plus community (and Facebook Group).

The first thing I look for when deciding to join a new community is not member count, number of posts, or even spam. What I look for is a community where every post gets at least a few comments. That way I know it's an actual community, and that if I join I'll be able to actually interact with other people with like interests.

So, if you want people to join your community, try encouraging a little interaction between your existing members first!
1
Eli “Elictrix” Osadchenko's profile photonerfinstructabler's profile photo
4 comments
 
I guess it's kind of ironic that I never replied to any comments on this post, lol.
Add a comment...

Carina Gonzalez

» ­Discussion  - 
 
Has anyone been using the gplus.to/ free service to provide a shortened URL to their community?  The gplus.to/ company seems to have folded.  Anyone know the details?
1
Carina Gonzalez's profile photoJack McKinstry's profile photo
8 comments
Add a comment...

Jillian See

» ­Discussion  - 
 
I have a most wonderful community and I am a moderater there ,unfortunately due to hiccups with google , trying access my account and with no success , I have created a new account same name, photo, which is accepted but have lost my original google + community login  and history.I can see that I am still a moderater there this happened yesterday!!.  Can someone tell me  how I can get back my original account .Thanks Jilly
1
Jillian See's profile photoGeorge “Jolo” Lavall's profile photo
4 comments
 
You didn't say your passwords were lost. You can retrieve your account in several ways. Asking others they can send a reset to your mobile phone. 
Add a comment...

Dan Eastwood

» ­Discussion  - 
 
This might be something moderators should be aware of, because it can make it difficult to tag a community member:

This profile is named 
+ReadyourbibleTodayLearnHow
but displays as
+Learn how to read the bible

If you type "+Learn how to read the bible" you get nothing. I'm not sure how that works, but it's a little annoying.

PS: Please don't bother this person. They have done nothing wrong, it's just the only example I have 

https://plus.google.com/+ReadyourbibleTodayLearnHow/about*
1
John R. Ellis's profile photoEli “Elictrix” Osadchenko's profile photo
4 comments
 
Well a lot of people have nicknames, so you may know the nickname but it shows up as something close or something else
Add a comment...

Danielle Buckley

» ­Discussion  - 
 
Do you own a public ask-to-join community (one where you approve each new member request)?  If you do, I'd love to chat with you about your community to get feedback as we improve the way communities work in G+.  Respond in the comments and I'll PM you.  

Thanks everybody for the work you do to create engaging communities experiences on G+!
12
3
Parity Aviel's profile photoMiha Rus's profile photoHafiz Sahab's profile photoAlondra Puente's profile photo
18 comments
 
Thanks danielle...i like your comunity
Add a comment...

Dr. Ronald G. Shapiro

» ­Discussion  - 
 
Hi,

     I moderate a very large (one of the largest 100) communities on Google+.  One of my roles is to remove inappropriate postings and ban members who display inappropriate behavior in the community.

     A few days ago one of the members posted a most inappropriate comment below the description of some of the programs which I offer.  I removed the posting and banned him from the community.
 
     As what seems to be retaliation he "shared" a copy of my article on his page with inappropriate language in the description as well as in some comments below.  I requested that G+ remove this and they have not.  I asked this community for help a few days ago and a few members provided information for me.

     My question to you at this time is more of a discussion than a request for help with this specific issue.

     My thinking is that as moderators we are providing a real service to Google to help their business and we are not being compensated.  As such, would it be unreasonable for Google to at a minimum provide us with some sort of hotline or expedited service when this happens to get stuff like this removed immediately?

     I do think that people should be able to post on their own page a comment about my community, whether or not they like the way I moderate it, or even to start their own community to compete with mine.

     I think that doing something like what this person did is not acceptable, and at a minimum their posting should be removed immediately (and perhaps they should be banned from all of Google). 

     What are your thoughts?   
3
Dan Eastwood's profile photoJohn R. Ellis's profile photo
25 comments
 
+Dan Eastwood People can be passionate about their beliefs, and express it in more or less socially acceptable ways.  Atheists and Skeptics get a lot of both death and lawsuit threats, but the death threats are rarely carried out.  Some people hate reality.
Add a comment...
 
We asked some of the best social media experts on LinkedIn to share their tips for tackling the trolls. 

What tips would you give? (oh, and don't forget to add us to your circles!) 
In folklore, a troll is: “an ugly cave-dwelling creature depicted as either a giant or a dwarf”. When we think of a troll nowadays, the wicked, supernatural, fairytale-like creature of children’s tales isn’t usually the first thing that springs to mind. Since the rise of the internet, a new type of troll has emerged. The troll as we know it today is...
1
Dan Eastwood's profile photo
 
With regards to G+ community moderation, I recommend copy/pasting generic "boilerplate" messages that refer them to the community rules, or quote the riles directly.
This addresses the problem directly, yet leaves the troll with an unsatisfactory reaction. I have a text file with a set of responses saved on Dropbox where I can quickly get to it when I need it.
Add a comment...

Jonathan Seyghal

» ­Discussion  - 
 
Jonathan Seyghal originally shared:
 
Well these moderation options seem new.

1
1
John R. Ellis's profile photoJonathan Seyghal's profile photoWill Horn's profile photo
6 comments
 
Mobile. Still got the trusty ability to ban, remove post and report as spam via 'ban member'.
Add a comment...

Chris Robinson

» ­Discussion  - 
 
Thoughts? What's the best way to fix these communities? 
 
+Google+ - Please Fix the Ghost Communities
Do you find it odd that the largest community on G+ has 5.8 MILLION followers and the owner and mod are not even on Google+? Now it makes sense why the fb community and some of the other monster communities are filled with porn and spam - no one can remove posts or ban spammers! See also this relevant post, http://goo.gl/xv24wm.
14 comments on original post
3
Richard Luo's profile photoJohn R. Ellis's profile photo
7 comments
 
+Richard Luo That's a different issue, but I thought G+ had fixed it - several of the biggest communities in a variety of different areas were not being listed at all in Community Search, but now are - maybe they have refined it in some way to not list the biggest orphaned ones?  That also explains why the growth stopped cold on it at end of January - well is down to only 200 added members per day.
Add a comment...

Community OHMS

» ­Discussion  - 
 
For your consideration....

#community  
 
All About Google+ Communities

Google+ offers two very different kinds of experiences that mimic the way we interact with people in the real world. We, of course, have personal friends and other informal groups of acquaintances we interact with. Circles provide that kind of experience in Google+. Another type of real world experience is provided by clubs, organizations, and other groups that are at least somewhat formalized. The equivalent of those in Google+ are Google+ communities. 

Google+ communities provide a completely different experience than interacting with circles. As with most real-world organizations, you must join a community to participate in it. Some communities allow you to see inside them without joining (more on that below), but you cannot post to a community or add comments to community posts without becoming a member. Part of the beauty of communities, though, is that new members can see all of the history of the community, which makes communities a great way for new Google+ users to start engaging with other people immediately.

How communities work
Communities are generally organized around specific topics or themes. You can find communities you might be interested in by selecting Communities on the Google+ main menu. That will take you to a page with the list of communities you are already a member of, a list of communities you might be interested in, and an option to search for communities. Note that you can remove suggested communities that are of no interest to you by moving the cursor over the community icon and clicking the "X" that will appear in the corner of the icon.

Most communities are further divided into categories, which can help you locate posts that are specific interest to you if the overall topic or theme of the community covers more than you want to see. There is also a search bar underneath the community's logo which allows you to perform searches that are restricted to the community itself.

Types of Google+ communities
There are two types of Google+ communities: Public and Private.

Public communities can be viewed by by anyone on the web, even if they do not have a Google+ profile. Non-members can see both the posts and the list of community members for public communities. Google+ members can join some public communities by simply clicking a button at the top. Others have buttons to ask to join because the person who created the community indicated that moderator approval is required for all members. 

Private communities are completely closed to anyone but members. Non-members cannot see posts inside a private community nor can they see the membership lists. The person who set up a community has the option of making the existence of the community itself invisible to non-members. Moderator approval is required to join all private communities. Since everything that goes on within private communities is restricted to the community, it is not even possible to share posts created in private communities, nor is it possible to +mention people who are not members of the community. 

How communities are managed
In addition to regular members, communities have Moderators. Moderators are responsible for managing the communities and managing their content. When you find a good community, you found a community that has good moderators because community moderation takes a tremendous amount of time and effort.

Moderators can remove posts that are inappropriate for the community and ban members who violate the community's rules. As an aside, moderators can see posts and comments within the community that were created by people who blocked them. That is necessary, of course, or malicious people could simply hide what they were doing in communities by blocking the moderators. 

Community rules
Activity in communities is subject to two sets of rules: the Google+ User Content and Conduct Policy (www.google.com/+/policy/content.html‎) and the rules established by the community itself. 

All Google+ users should become familiar with the Google+ User Content and Conduct Policy because the rules there apply to everything we do on Google+, whether it is in a community or not. The most important thing to remember about the Policy rules with respect to communities is that communities cannot give license to violate Google's rules. For example, rule #9 says "Do not distribute content that contains nudity, graphic sex acts, or sexually explicit material. Do not drive traffic to commercial pornography sites." That means pornography is not allowed in any communities. It does not matter whether the communities are public or private.

It is extremely important to become familiar with the rules for a community, which can normally be found on the community's About this community card, before becoming active in a community. The rules can vary widely between communities. Failure to comply with a community's rules can result in your being banned from it, sometimes for just a single offense. That decision is totally at the discretion of the community's owner and moderators, and only they can remove a ban. Google does not get involved in any way and cannot help you get reinstated in a community from which you have been banned. 

As I said, community rules vary widely, but the following are behaviors that are frequently -- but not always -- prohibited:

* Creating off-topic posts:  Communities generally have specific themes. Creating posts that do not fall within those themes is a form of spamming. Not only can you get banned from communities for creating off-topic posts, but doing that frequently can result in Google treating you as a spammer. In serious cases, you could lose your Google+ account for spamming communities.

* Promoting other communities: Very few communities allow you to promote other communities. Many do, however, allow you to add a comment referring the person who created a post to another community that might be a better place to get an answer -- but only if the other community is not on the same topic. For example, it would generally be acceptable to refer a person in a community for authors to the Google+ Help community (Google's official English-language support channel for Google+) for help with Google+ issues but not acceptable to refer them to another community on writing unless the subject of the question was outside the scope of the original community.

* Self-promotion: Many communities do not allow you to create posts that simply "sell" your blog, your business, your Google+ Page, or the like -- but some do. In fact, some communities specifically allow that and a few encourage it. Providing a link to your blog or website is frequently considered a form of self-promotion.

* Link-dropping: Posts that have nothing more than a URL are relatively unpopular with readers anyway but are strictly forbidden in many communities. It is always a good idea to write original content in community posts giving information about what can be found at the other end of the link. The most effective posts generally give readers a significant amount of information of value in the posts themselves and include relevant links for those wanting more details. Note that only repeating the title of a blog post or website, or simply saying something like "Interesting information" is generally viewed as being equivalent to posting only a link.

* Creating posts in the wrong categories: As previously mentioned, most communities are subdivided into categories. It is extremely important to assign your posts to the right category. Moderators can override your selection, but you should never waste moderator's time by posting to the wrong category. In some cases, doing so (especially repeatedly) can get you banned from communities. Note also that creating the same post in multiple categories in a community is almost always treated as spamming.

Why you can't share a post with multiple communities or communities and circles
Communities are intended to be limited. Posts to private communities can only be seen by community members. Posts to public communities can be seen by anyone but only members of the community can comment on them. If you could cross-post to a community and people outside that community (which would happen implicitly if you could share a post with multiple communities), it would break the integrity of the community because people outside the community could see and comment on the posts. There have to be separate posts to maintain that integrity and, in the case of private communities, to protect the privacy of the community members.
8 comments on original post
3
2
John Skeats's profile photoGarth McKay's profile photoGeorge “Jolo” Lavall's profile photo
 
Thanks for resharing, +Community OHMS. 
Add a comment...
 
Help please my G+ hasn't been working properly when I open the app from the app it kicks me out and the only way I could get here was through chrome am I banned help 
1
John R. Ellis's profile photo
 
Try reloading your App.  You posted here, so apparently you are not yet banned.
Add a comment...

Clinical 77

» ­Discussion  - 
 
Question.  I joined a site and noticed shortly thereafter the "moderator" was very offensive.   Makes sexual references towards women and posts nudity. 

I know you can report inappropriate posts, but wondering if the reports are going to the moderator is there a point, or do reports go to a "google" team?
2
John Skeats's profile photoClinical 77's profile photo
4 comments
 
Thanks again +John R. Ellis  and thank you +John Skeats 
Add a comment...
 
Any communities you know of that could use a kick in the pants? I can think of a dozen I've had to quit in the last two years because of the amount of nonsense that is allowed to occur.
 
Have you given up on your community, or was this the plan all along?
A healthy online community is active and vibrant, with enthusiastic and helpful members. Unhealthy communities, on the other hand, are not moderated, and the only active members seem to be there only to promote their own causes or their own business interests. As a community manager, you can’t just start a community and hope for the best to happen. You have to remain vigilant, and take necessary steps to keep improving it.

http://andrij.co/blog/sloth

From the "Seven Sins of Community Management" Series
http://andrij.co/blog/community-management-sins/

#communitymanagement   #socialmedia  #communities
Have you given up on your community, or was this the plan all along?
4 comments on original post
8
Andrij “Andrew” Harasewych's profile photoMari-Lyn Harris's profile photo
3 comments
 
I would say I am more of a task master at this, yet because I am less people want to be a part of the group. However, the people who are in the group really do participate and feel supported.
Add a comment...

Sole Soleidae

» ­Discussion  - 
 
GUYS HELP!!!, i am the owner of the "random" and i accidentally deleted my account, and now i am not the owner, how can i be the owner again

NOTE: I cant recover my account

There are 3 moderators on the community can they help? i can contact all of them. if necessary....HELP ME!!!
1
Sole Soleidae's profile photoEli “Elictrix” Osadchenko's profile photo
19 comments
Add a comment...

Deborah Stambler

» ­Discussion  - 
 
Hi there- I'm moderator for a GPC that's private. I've successfully sent out 3 invites. Now, the invites I'm sending are being received. The people I'm inviting are in my Circles and in the Circles for the owner of the GPC. I can't find any good info on a fix. Anyone else had this problem? Any suggestions for a fix and for where to find really solid support? I'm worried because some of the people I need to invite are a bit techno-phobic.
1
John R. Ellis's profile photoDeborah Stambler's profile photo
3 comments
 
Thanks! i got it working.
Add a comment...

Susan Rastella

» ­Discussion  - 
 
HI, I'm fairly new as a moderator on a Google community.  I started posting as just a member.  Within a week or so I was "promoted" to moderator.  Then, a week later, I became the owner of the community.  Now, I don't mind since I am very interested in this community and it gives me a chance to get more people involved but how did this happen?   Any thoughts?
3
John R. Ellis's profile photoSusan Rastella's profile photo
4 comments
 
Thank you all for your input.  The group is relatively small (723) but I can claim somewhat of a contribution because it had only 434 when I started as a contributor.  It has one other owner but he never posts and ten moderators (one I added).  Hopefully it's my communication skills and not an accident.  The comment about contacting the owner was perfect.  I did and never did get a response.  I guess I'll just keep adding content and hope everyone else gets more involved or give me a direction they would like to see.
Add a comment...
 
Well so we had this community, there was an Owner and two other Mods. (one of them was me) and then what happened is that someone hacked the Owner's account and she had to delete it. It was all in a hurry and she had no time to promote one of the mods to an owner. Meanwhile what happened is that someone removed the other mod from the community. Most probably, it was that hacker. So when the other mod finally joined back, she was no longer a mod and we don't have an owner to promote her back either. I'm now the sole mod of that community......so can anyone give a solution for this problem, is there any chance by which we could get an owner or another mod may be????
1
PARTHABI KANUNGO's profile photoMarsha Sortino's profile photo
3 comments
 
Good answer +John R. Ellis thank you. :)
Add a comment...