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My mind, once again, goes to the same old conundrum : I can find a Western book, with few connects to India and Indian Realities, in an Indian Book Store. And I am yet to find a good book on Indian Case Studies – I am aware of a minimum of 6 excellent books of case studies of which I myself have studied 5 {Anisha Motwani, Prachi Garg – 2, Anuradha Goel, and a book on Positioning}, with a fifth in my purchase list already. Not one of these has made it to bookstores in India.

Why is this shocking pusillanimous and thoroughly repugnant fascination we have for the West still present? To management faculty, institutes and colleges – my blunt & straightforward question – ALL of these are Corporate Professionals. Why have you abandoned your core duty of documentation and research? Where are you in this list?


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Book Review: Newly released Girl Last Seen by Nina Laurin is a gritty and faced paced! http://www.aurorabsbookblog.com/girl-last-seen-nina-laurin-book-review/
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Psion Mates is now FREE on:
Apple iBooks
Barnes & Noble
Google Play
Kobo
InstaFreebie
Smashwords
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“City of Saints and Madmen: The Book of Ambergris” by Jeff VanderMeer

It’s an outstanding, strange and weird book. The book brings on some associations with books by Edward Whittemore and Kurt Vonnegut Jr., Lord Dunsany and Howard Phillips Lovecraft, China Mieville and Jonathan Swift – but it’s an original own creation by Jeff VanderMeer, in fact not similar to creation of any other author.
“City of Saints and Madmen: The Book of Ambergris” is a cycle of novelettes and short stories, fragments from “historical chronicles” and “monographies”, essays and glossaries united by the same place of literary action: the city of Ambergris. Ambergris is an enigmatic and attractive, cruel and majestic, dirty and refined city situated in a “nowhere land”, a result of a violent imagination of Jeff VanderMeer. It’s a city of dreams and nightmares, carnal amusements and weird cults, dark secrets an politics, a city of painters and writers, dramaturgs and architects, merchants and bankers, priests and fishers, mushrooms and squids; a city that has been founded by pirates and whalers on a blood of an ancient mysterious race...
It’s a place where an everyday routine slowly turns into a deathly madness, where your dreams can turn into reality, and reality turns into a figment of a stranger’s imagination. You can find here a dark irony and sarcastic satire, and a crazy kaleidoscope of poetic and infernal images will swallow you up into the VanderMeer’s text as into the silty depth of the great river Moth, where the tentacles of freshwater King Squid are waiting for careless sailors.
All things are interacting here: short stories and novelettes, manuscripts fragments and essays, all the details of the book, and together all these fragments create a common psychedelic space of hypertext where the author is inseparable from his world and characters and the logic of the book in inseparable from its madness...
It’s an outstanding book. It’s fearful and ironic, whimsical and attractive. No one book is similar to it. Author’s literary style is figurative and unique, viscous and fascinating.
By the words, the book contains a preface by Michael Moorcock, and this preface is as psychedelic as VanderMeer’s text.
This book is complex and “slow” – you’ll can’t to read it up to the end during one day. It’s not a book for “easy reading” and “action” lovers. But for all other readers “City of Saints and Madmen: The Book of Ambergris” is highly recommended.
But warning: here there are squids. And not only squids are there...

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23.06.2017
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This Chick Read: Frostblood (Frostblood Saga #1) by Elly Blake #giveaway

Ruby and her mom have kept a secret from her village for years…they thought. When Frostblood soldiers show up in town, the villagers hand her over to save themselves. Ruby embraces her heritage to escape and ends up watching her mother die and her village burn down.

https://thereadingchick.com/2017/06/23/this-chick-read-frostblood-frostblood-saga-1-by-elly-blake/

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Rez, the typical Californian teenager: he likes surfing and spending time with his friends at the beach and who has a crush on an attractive girl. His life changes when he, born in the USA, suddenly is identified as an “immigrant” and eyed suspiciously. Might there be a terrorist underneath the surface of the seemingly average American boy? His friends withdraw one after the other and Rez has to question his identity. An uncommon coming-of-age novel in times of global terror and quick attributions. Laleh Khadivi – “A Good Country”.
#lalehkhadivi #agoodcountry #review


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