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Nice read about life in the wild world of operating services on maturing platforms.

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Docker is a popular tool for deploying software in containers. It's not dead yet, but this entertaining piece tells of repeated failures. Featuring:
Docker Issue: Breaking changes and regressions
The debacle of Overlay
Bonus: The worldwide docker outage ("a 7 hours interplanetary outage")
Docker Registry Issue: Abandon and Extinguish
Docker Issue: The release cycle
- Abandon whatever exists
- Make new stuff and release
- Ignore existing users and retro compatibility
A Personal Opinion
Docker is gaining momentum ... The docker hype is not only a technological liability any more, it has evolved into a sociological problem as well.

"""
Judging by the past history of Docker, we can approximate that anything made by Docker has a half-life of about 1 year. There will usually be a replacement available, that is not fully compatible with what it’s supposed to replace, and may or may not run on the same ecosystem (if at all).
"""

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"This regular expression has been replaced with a substring function"

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Via Hacker News, an interesting bug that prevented an emacs client program from connecting to its parent emacs server, due to environment sanitizing in the perl executable that launches emacs.

Take-away quote: "This computer stuff is amazingly complicated. I don't know how anyone gets anything done."

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1997: "Operators abandon the control room of a U.S. nuclear power reactor. A member of the training department took a picture of a fire detection panel ... The camera’s flash tricked the fire detector circuit into sensing a fire. Seconds later, the fire suppression system discharged Halon gas into the control room. Seconds later, the operators fled the control room... For 35 minutes, the operators monitored controls through a window in an adjacent room, darting back into the control room when necessary to response to alarms."

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A long piece on the failure of the Tacoma Narrows Bridge - often misattributed to resonance. Several videos within - including one of the Volgograd Bridge.
"""Henry Petroski, an engineer and scholar of failure, observes that major bridge failures occur roughly every thirty years, which may be the time that it takes for a new generation of engineers to forget the lessons of their predecessors. "The essential lesson of the Tacoma Narrows Bridge," he writes, "is not that it fell but that it fell in an atmosphere of confidence that it would not, in a manner that was not anticipated.""""
"""The situation that gave rise to the original bridge's risky design echoes patterns that existed prior to the explosion of the Space Shuttle Challenger and the GM ignition switch debacle. Cultures of groupthink discourage dissent, stepping up, speaking out, admitting fault, and making redesigns even when they are essential."""

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This is an outstanding review of an incident in Massachusetts that should never have happened. The "Normalization of Deviance" is related to the the "Drift Into Failure". 

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10,000 global variables? Oh boy...


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"On August 1 last year, a Boeing 737-838 (VH-VZR) operated by Qantas performed a "tailstrike" while taking off from Sydney airport. Today, the Australian Transport Safety Bureau (ATSB) has concluded that the strike was caused by the co-pilot fat-fingering the plane's takeoff weight: instead of typing the plane's actual weight of 76,400kg into the iPad, he accidentally typed 66,400kg. As a result, the plane didn't have quite enough thrust to clear the runway without clipping the ground with its tail."

http://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2015/11/qantas-737-tailstrike-was-caused-by-ipad-data-entry-fail/
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