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Natkritta Panprasert
moderator

archaeology news  - 
 
 
The tail of a 99-million-year-old dinosaur has been discovered in Myanmar, complete with feathers, bones, and soft tissue, according to a new report. The finding is the very first of its kind, much to the delight of scientists across the globe.
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carlos augusto da cruz novo

Y-DNA general Discussion  - 
 
My result y DNA is cohen J1 in 12 markers,
My closest relatives are the Spanish branch of a family of Perez and the Ashkenazi Jews of Eastern and Central Europe, 
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Jerry Throneberry

general Discussion  - 
 
I just got my DNA results back and I had 2% African DNA show up. Does this mean I have African ancestry?
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ava lawrence's profile photoShannon Dillman's profile photo
15 comments
 
We get our DNA 50%/50% from our biological parents. Back any further than that, and it's all statistics. You get on average 25% of your DNA from each of your four grandparents, but that's only an average. Your parents pass along half of their mix of their two parents, but your bundle might contain more of, say, your maternal grandfather's contribution to your father, where your sibling's bundle got more of your maternal grandmother's contribution to him. Same with your mother.

A helpful way to visualize this is to picture your parents as having a bag of 100 marbles each. Mom's bag has a 50/50 mix of light pink and light blue marbles. Dad's is a 50/50 mix of dark pink and dark blue marbles. Each of them reaches into their bags and pulls out a random assortment of 50 marbles to make you. (a sorceror then replaces the exact ones removed, to make room for sibling to come).

You get
20 lt pink, 30 lt blue; 24 dk pink, & 26 dk blue
When mom & dad decide to bring you a sibling, she gets
29 lt pink, 21 lt blue; 27 dk pink, & 23 dk blue

You each got 100 marbles, 50 from each of your parents, but you got different mixes.

Down the road, you're passing along more of your maternal grandfather. Your sister's descendants have more of your maternal grandmother to pass along. If your Native American ancestor is represented in those light blue marbles of your maternal grandfather, you got a lot more of it than your sister did, and your kids are more likely to have that signal persist than hers are.

Of course, the marbles are of an overly simplified model that doesn't take into account the lengths of the unbroken chunks of DNA. When they get very short, it becomes difficult to attribute them to any one person. A good example involves me and my full sister. She matches a LOT more people than I do, especially on our father's side. She didn't get more of our father's DNA - remember, parental DNA is the only guaranteed 50/50 contribution. But she got longer unbroken pieces of it. In general, my dna got chopped up a lot more on both sides.

By the time you get more than 3 generations out, you start to lose connection to a lot of cousins. Heck, my sister has 1.6x more in common with our 1C1R than I do. Imagine the difference even one more generation down, let alone 5, 6, or more.

Your 2% isn't a whole lot, but that combined with your alleged Native ancestor suggests to my amateur eyes that it may be real. A number of tribes, such as the Seminole, made common cause with many African Americans. In other cases, it was more socially acceptable to pass a darker skin tone off as an "Indian princess" ancestor than an African one, and that story gets passed down the line. Do you have other near relatives to test?

A terrific article on the significance of small amounts of DNA, and how limited ancestry of a single ethnic group can wash out in only a few generations' time is here: http://www.rootsandrecombinantdna.com/2015/03/native-american-dna-is-just-not-that.html
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Natkritta Panprasert
moderator

general Discussion  - 
 
 
A new gene manipulation technique that hopes to restore sight to the visually impaired will be tested on humans in the next three years.
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Natkritta Panprasert
moderator

general Discussion  - 
 
Neanderthals’ parting gifts to Homo sapiens were disease-causing genes
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Natkritta Panprasert
moderator

archaeology news  - 
 
 
Scientists in Poland have discovered the world’s oldest preserved fossilized blood vessels inside the bones of reptiles that became extinct millions of years ago.
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Leonardo Castro

Geno 2.0 - Genographic Project Discussion  - 
 
I'm curious about how different the results of full siblings could be. Do someone have real results for siblings that could be shown here?
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Deborah Walker's profile photoLeonardo Castro's profile photo
2 comments
 
Ethnicity. I wonder how different my sisters' results can be from mine (they don't plan to do such tests soon).
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Jorge Luis Blanco Santos

native American DNA / Ancestry  - 
 
dear cousin hears these to arrive in Cuba and I would like to know when you come comunicate with me or my sister Nadia, ok greetings to you and yours
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Leonardo Castro

Geno 2.0 - Genographic Project Discussion  - 
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Leonardo Castro's profile photoSteve Paul's profile photo
7 comments
 
+Leonardo Castro I'm also glad that you helped me learn that National Geographic is offering dna testing :-)
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About this community

Welcome to the Genetic Genealogy Community at Google+. Reconnect with lost close relatives. Learn about the migration paths your ancestors took. Make new friends worldwide by testing your own DNA, and those of your parents, and comparing the test results to those of others. Everybody is welcome to post constructive entries, for example: what have you learned so far? Want to discuss the history of a specific haplogroup? Have technical questions? Share a relevant news story? Please feel free to promote the group, invite your G+ & (still at) FB friends to join it.
Planet Earth

Carlysle Jude

general Discussion  - 
 
This is Deena Plaster Vance your cousin. I agree with most ALL you believe in. Astronomy Aliens etc on your blog.
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Colin Dickie

Y-DNA general Discussion  - 
 
From the data by Capelli, et all "A Y Chromosome Census of the British Isles" Current Biology Vol. 13 979-984 May 27, 2003
 
Y-Chromosome Ternary diagram. Most modern British populations fit neatly into a ternary space (shaded area) between Norway, Anglo-Saxon and Indigenous Britons. Why is Shetland so different?
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Colin Dickie's profile photoPietro Decaro's profile photo
15 comments
 
any connections to the Wrigley surname?
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Natkritta Panprasert
moderator

archaeology news  - 
 
 
'They have been executed, all in the same manner. But they have been buried with respect'
A discovery has been made in Greece that might chill you to the bone. At least 80 skeletons were unearthed at an ancient cemetery, their wrists bound by iron shackles, with the remains believed to be those of the victims of a mass execution.
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Kolberg Art & Science Club
moderator

ancient DNA Discussion  - 
 
Archaeologists uncover extraordinary remains of mother looking down at infant in her arms
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Julien Paulhan's profile photo
 
no dna testing? wondering what the haplogroups may be..
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Annette Kapple
moderator

general Discussion  - 
 
A recap of a Genetic Genealogy discussion last Sunday. http://annettekapple.blogspot.com/2016/04/recap-of-sundays-sl-discussion-working.html
We've been having DNA discussions in the virtual world of Second Life (just consult the "Genealogists In Second Life" page at Facebook for more details). Our next discussion will be on Sunday May 1, 2016. Here is a recap of o...
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Newest Inventions

general Discussion  - 
 
How Bacteria make Grappling Hook for Propulsion- Transportation through Blood Vessels in Tumor Cells
For more information watch the video on youtube https://youtu.be/SuX3dDtQODw and read description.
Scientists have devised a triple-stage "cluster bomb" system for delivering the chemotherapy drug cisplatin, via tiny nanoparticles designed to break up when they reach a tumor.
Subscribe: https://goo.gl/UU6Zpz
Details of the particles’ design and their potency against cancer in mice were published this week in PNAS. What makes these particles distinctive is that they start out relatively large -- 100 nanometers wide – to enable smooth transport into the tumor through leaky blood vessels. Inside tumor cells, a second chemical step activates the platinum-based cisplatin, which kills by crosslinking and damaging DNA.
#newest  #inventions  #microbiology  #science  #bacteria #nanoparticles  #cisplatin  #blood  #vessels  #acidic  #tumor #dna  #drugs
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Annette Kapple
moderator

general Discussion  - 
 
No, I don't think we do need to be scientists to work with our segment data. We don't have access to actual data to scientifically analyze our own results as far as coming up with IBD statistics anyway. We can look at populat...
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Annette Kapple
moderator

general Discussion  - 
We've been discussing endogamy in the ISOGG group. I took a poll at ISOGG a few weeks ago and learned that first cousin marriage was not uncommon in earlier times. This is true of certain groups. People living in isolated pla...
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