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HMS Leith was ordered on 1 November 1932 under the 1931 Programme. She was laid down at Devonport Dockyard on 6 February 1933, launched on 9 September 1933 and commissioned on 10 July 1934. She was initially assigned to the New Zealand Division of the Royal Navy, manned by the Chatham Port Division. Leith arrived at Auckland on 13 November 1934, and was deployed in the Pacific and locally in New Zealand waters.[1] She was recommissioned in December 1936 in order to continue to serve with the New Zealand Division and was again in July 1939. She had an active career in the Pacific, making numerous visits to Colonial possessions, and on one occasion taking Salote Tupou III, Queen of Tonga on a visit to outlying islands.
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Leith was ordered on 1 November 1932 under the 1931 Programme. She was laid down at Devonport Dockyard on 6 February 1933, launched on 9 September 1933 and commissioned on 10 July 1934. She was initially assigned to the New Zealand Division of the Royal Navy, manned by the Chatham Port Division. Leith arrived at Auckland on 13 November 1934, and was deployed in the Pacific and locally in New Zealand waters.[1] She was recommissioned in December 1936 in order to continue to serve with the New Zealand Division and was again in July 1939. She had an active career in the Pacific, making numerous visits to Colonial possessions, and on one occasion taking Salote Tupou III, Queen of Tonga on a visit to outlying islands.
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Leith was ordered on 1 November 1932 under the 1931 Programme. She was laid down at Devonport Dockyard on 6 February 1933, launched on 9 September 1933 and commissioned on 10 July 1934. She was initially assigned to the New Zealand Division of the Royal Navy, manned by the Chatham Port Division. Leith arrived at Auckland on 13 November 1934, and was deployed in the Pacific and locally in New Zealand waters.[1] She was recommissioned in December 1936 in order to continue to serve with the New Zealand Division and was again in July 1939. She had an active career in the Pacific, making numerous visits to Colonial possessions, and on one occasion taking Salote Tupou III, Queen of Tonga on a visit to outlying islands.
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HMNZS Lachlan - HMAS Lachlan shortly after the end of World War II
HMAS Lachlan (K364/F364) (later HMNZS Lachlan (F364)) was a River-class frigate that served the Royal Australian Navy (RAN) from 1945 to 1949.
Lachlan was laid down by Morts Dock and Engineering Company at Balmain, New South Wales on 22 March 1943 and launched on 25 March 1944 by Sarah McNamara Scullin, wife of former Australian Prime Minister James Scullin. The ship was named for the Lachlan River in New South Wales, and commissioned into the RAN on 14 February 1945.
During 1945, Lachlan was used during the opening of the Captain Cook Graving Dock; her bow was used to cut the ribbon across the drydock's mouth.[1]
Lachlan paid off on 5 October 1949. She was transferred to the Royal New Zealand Navy, renamed HMNZS Lachlan, and served as a survey and Antarctic supply vessel until February 1975. She was used as a "Refit Barge" with many workshops onboard until the late 1980s when she was sold to Chile to continue work as floating workshops for ships being refitted
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HMAS_Lachlan_(K364)
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Devonport in 1929. The New Zealand Squadron, as shown, was HMS Dunedin and HMS Diomede, with the two Imperial sloops Veronica and Laburnum astern. Philomel and Wakakura are at the training jetty, with the battle-practice target and the cable ship Recorder in the background
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HMS Veronica and HMS Laburnum
HMS Laburnum
The NZ Division, of the Royal Navy. - H.M.S. Laburnum
HMS Laburnum was a Royal Navy Acacia-class sloop built by Charles Connell and Company, Scotstoun. She was scuttled during the fall of Singapore in 1942.
Easter Rising[edit]
In April 1916, during the Easter Rising in Ireland, Laburnam shelled the outskirts of Galway.
Far East service[edit]
She was in the New Zealand Division of the Royal Navy from 11 March 1922 to 11 February 1935, where she exercised with cruisers, toured New Zealand ports, took part in ceremonial occasions, and went on annual Pacific Island cruises. This was in conjunction with her sister ship Veronica which was similar, but with small differences as they came from different commercial shipyards.
She left Auckland on 1 February 1935 for Singapore, where she was paid off to become a drill and training ship for the Straits Settlement Naval Volunteer Reserve.
Drill ship at Singapore[edit]
As drill ship, Laburnum was equipped with independent wireless equipment, and housed a number of naval offices including Captain, Auxiliary Vessels and Captain, Extended Defences Office. Laburnum had her engines removed shortly after her arrival in Singapore in order to augment her accommodation. Hence she could not be fully utilised when war broke out in the Far East. With the evacuation of Penang, Laburnum also played host to the RNVR Penang Division, headed by Commander C C Alexander.
Fate[edit]
She was lost by scuttling on 15 February 1942 during the fall of Singapore. The wreck was raised about 1946, and sunk off East Lagoon, Singapore as part of an existing breakwater of old hulks, and finally removed and scrapped about 1967.
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The NZ Division, of the Royal Navy. – H.M.S. Laburnum http://ift.tt/1XnGxWO
Visit to Great Barrier Island of HMS Laburnum 1922
LABURNUM IN PORT.

ARRIVAL FROM ENGLAND. A FINE WEATHER PASSAGE. The war-sloop Laburnum, which has come out to New Zealand from England for service in these waters, arrived yesterday afternoon from Port Fitzroy, on the Great Barrier Island, where she made a stay of about five days for general cleaning-tip purposes before steaming into Auckland. She is a sister ship to H.M.S. Veronica, and is now at the Sheerlegs wharf, near the Calliope Dock. The Laburnum left Devonport, England, on November 24 last and had a fine weather passage all the way to New Zealand, taking the Mediterranean route, through the Suez Canal and the Red Sea, across the Indian Ocean and through Torres Strait, to the North of the Australian Continent. A stop was made at a number of ports en route, including Gibraltar, Malta, Port Said, Aden, Colombo, Singapore, Batavia, Thursday Island, Noumea and Port Fitzroy, Christmas being spent at Aden. On arrival yesterday Commander G. Shetston reported the arrival of the s Laburnum to Commodore A. G. Hotham, of HMS Chatham, and later met Commander F. H. L. Lewin, of H.M.S. Veronica. This morning he visited H.M.S. 1 Philomel. The following are the ship’s officers:—Commander G. Sherston, Lieutenant J. S. Raynes. Lieutenant R. B. Gibb, Lieutenant J. L. Isacke, Surgeon-Lieutenant- Commander J. A. Watson, Gunner W. H. Lake and Commissioned Engineer E. I Brown. The officers and men all come from Great Britain with the exception of Surgeon Lieutenant-Commander Watson, who is a native of Wellington. Two of the crew were met by relatives on arrival. Auckland Star, Volume LIII, Issue 65, 18 March 1922, Page 6
H.M. sloop Laburnum, which has been fitted out for duty in New Zealand waters, arrived at the Great Barrier Island on Saturday and is undergoing a general cleaning after her voyage from England. She will leave Port Fitzroy towards the end of the week for Auckland, and is expected to arrive here on Friday. Her displacement is 1250 tons and her length 255 feet, and she has engines capable of developing a speed of 17 knots. Her officers include:—Lieut. John S. Raynes, Lieutenant Roger B. Gibb, Acting-Lieutenant John L. isacke; surgeon, Lieutenant-Commander I. A. Watson-, gunner, William H. Lake; warrant engineer, Elias Brown.
Auckland Star, Volume LIII, Issue 61, 14 March 1922, Page 4
http://rnznships.tumblr.com/page/42
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