Post is pinned.
OSSUGSA followers can post own news in this forum

Just a reminder that this is a public and open forum where any follower can post news, updates, etc relating to FOSS in this forum. When posting just select the relevant thread / category that you want it to appear in.

Post has shared content
This Open Source WP 34S calculator is based on a HP-42S RPN Scientific Calculator

It uses the mechanics and hardware of an HP-20b Business Consultant or an HP-30b Business Professional, respectively, so you benefit from the excellent processor speed of these pocket calculators (this software, using these two base calculators, turns either of these calculators into a powerful keystroke programmable scientific device - or you can just run the emulator software). And with an HP-30b you also get the famous rotate-and-click keys, giving you the tactile feedback that has been appreciated in vintage Hewlett-Packard calculators for decades.

The function set of this WP 34S is based on the famous HP-42S RPN Scientific of 1988, the most powerful programmable RPN calculator industrially built so far. They have expanded the set, incorporating the functions of the renowned computer scientist’s HP-16C, the fraction mode of the HP-32SII, and probability distributions similar to those of the HP-21S. They have also included numerous additional useful functions for mathematics, statistics, physics, engineering, programming, I/O, etc., such as:

+ Euler’s Beta and Riemann’s Zeta functions, Bernoulli and Fibonacci numbers,
Lambert’s W, the error function, and the Chebyshev, Hermite, Laguerre, and
Legendre orthogonal polynomials (no more need to carry heavy printed tables),
+ many statistical distributions and their inverses: Poisson, Binomial, Geometric,
Cauchy-Lorentz, Exponential, Logistic, Weibull, Lognormal, and Gaussian,
+ programmable sums and products, first and second derivatives, solving quadratic equations for real and complex roots,
+ testing for primality,
+ integer computing in fifteen bases from binary to hexadecimal,
+ extended date and time operations and a stopwatch3 based on a real-time clock,
+ financial operations such as mean rate of return and margin calculations,
+ 88 conversions, mainly from old Imperial to universal SI units and vice versa,
+ 50 fundamental physical constants as accurate as used today by national standards
institutes such as NIST or PTB, plus a selection of important constants from
mathematics, astronomy, and surveying,
+ bidirectional serial communication with your computer, as well as printing on an HP
82240A/B 4,
+ battery-fail-safe on-board backup memory,
+ Greek and extended Latin letters covering the languages of almost half of the world’s population (upper and lower case in two font sizes), plus mathematical symbols.

The WP 34S is the first RPN calculator overcoming the limits of a four-level stack. The WP 34S features a choice of two stack sizes expanded by a complex LASTx register: traditional four stack levels for HP compatibility, eight levels for convenient calculations in complex domain, for advanced real calculus, vector algebra in 4D, or whatever application you have in mind. You will find a full
set of commands for stack handling and navigation in either stack size.

Furthermore, the WP 34S features up to 107 global general purpose registers, 112 global user flags, up to 928 program steps in RAM, up to 6014 program steps in flash memory, a 30 byte alpha register for message generation, 16 local flags as well as up to 144 local registers allowing for recursive programming, and 4 user-programmable hotkeys for your personal favorite functions.

The WP 34S is named in honour of the HP-34C from 1979, one of the most powerful compact LED pocket calculators.

They also include a detailed 211 owners manual. You can grab a download or have a look at the source code at https://sourceforge.net/projects/wp34s/. The emulator software for Linux, Mac and Windows can be found at https://sourceforge.net/projects/wp34s/files/emulator/ or you can buy ready made ones from https://commerce.hpcalc.org/34s.php.

#WP34S #HP42S #HP30b #HP20b #HPcalculator
This Open Source WP 34S calculator is based on a HP-42S RPN Scientific Calculator

It uses the mechanics and hardware of an HP-20b Business Consultant or an HP-30b Business Professional, respectively, so you benefit from the excellent processor speed of these pocket calculators (this software, using these two base calculators, turns either of these calculators into a powerful keystroke programmable scientific device - or you can just run the emulator software). And with an HP-30b you also get the famous rotate-and-click keys, giving you the tactile feedback that has been appreciated in vintage Hewlett-Packard calculators for decades.

The function set of this WP 34S is based on the famous HP-42S RPN Scientific of 1988, the most powerful programmable RPN calculator industrially built so far. They have expanded the set, incorporating the functions of the renowned computer scientist’s HP-16C, the fraction mode of the HP-32SII, and probability distributions similar to those of the HP-21S. They have also included numerous additional useful functions for mathematics, statistics, physics, engineering, programming, I/O, etc., such as:

+ Euler’s Beta and Riemann’s Zeta functions, Bernoulli and Fibonacci numbers,
Lambert’s W, the error function, and the Chebyshev, Hermite, Laguerre, and
Legendre orthogonal polynomials (no more need to carry heavy printed tables),
+ many statistical distributions and their inverses: Poisson, Binomial, Geometric,
Cauchy-Lorentz, Exponential, Logistic, Weibull, Lognormal, and Gaussian,
+ programmable sums and products, first and second derivatives, solving quadratic equations for real and complex roots,
+ testing for primality,
+ integer computing in fifteen bases from binary to hexadecimal,
+ extended date and time operations and a stopwatch3 based on a real-time clock,
+ financial operations such as mean rate of return and margin calculations,
+ 88 conversions, mainly from old Imperial to universal SI units and vice versa,
+ 50 fundamental physical constants as accurate as used today by national standards
institutes such as NIST or PTB, plus a selection of important constants from
mathematics, astronomy, and surveying,
+ bidirectional serial communication with your computer, as well as printing on an HP
82240A/B 4,
+ battery-fail-safe on-board backup memory,
+ Greek and extended Latin letters covering the languages of almost half of the world’s population (upper and lower case in two font sizes), plus mathematical symbols.

The WP 34S is the first RPN calculator overcoming the limits of a four-level stack. The WP 34S features a choice of two stack sizes expanded by a complex LASTx register: traditional four stack levels for HP compatibility, eight levels for convenient calculations in complex domain, for advanced real calculus, vector algebra in 4D, or whatever application you have in mind. You will find a full
set of commands for stack handling and navigation in either stack size.

Furthermore, the WP 34S features up to 107 global general purpose registers, 112 global user flags, up to 928 program steps in RAM, up to 6014 program steps in flash memory, a 30 byte alpha register for message generation, 16 local flags as well as up to 144 local registers allowing for recursive programming, and 4 user-programmable hotkeys for your personal favorite functions.

The WP 34S is named in honour of the HP-34C from 1979, one of the most powerful compact LED pocket calculators.

They also include a detailed 211 owners manual. You can grab a download or have a look at the source code at https://sourceforge.net/projects/wp34s/. The emulator software for Linux, Mac and Windows can be found at https://sourceforge.net/projects/wp34s/files/emulator/ or you can buy ready made ones from https://commerce.hpcalc.org/34s.php.

#WP34S #HP42S #HP30b #HP20b #HPcalculator
Photo

Post has shared content
LibreOffice 'Getting Started Guide 6.0' released in PDF, ODT and EPUB formats

Covering spreadsheets, presentations, texts, drawings, databases and the equations editor, as well as other important concepts in LibreOffice, the guide updates the previous book for LibreOffice 5.2 with the features implemented up to the 6.0 release. As it’s an introductory text, some advanced topics were left out, and are to be addressed in the other specialized modules guides, such as the Writer Guide 6.0. This turns the Getting Started Guide into a light reading on all of LibreOffice’s most important features and concepts.

The ODF and ePub versions are editable so could be tailored for a specific organisation or group.

See https://blog.documentfoundation.org/blog/2018/09/17/documentation-getting-started-guide-6-0-released/

#libreoffice
LibreOffice 'Getting Started Guide 6.0' released in PDF, ODT and EPUB formats

Covering spreadsheets, presentations, texts, drawings, databases and the equations editor, as well as other important concepts in LibreOffice, the guide updates the previous book for LibreOffice 5.2 with the features implemented up to the 6.0 release. As it’s an introductory text, some advanced topics were left out, and are to be addressed in the other specialized modules guides, such as the Writer Guide 6.0. This turns the Getting Started Guide into a light reading on all of LibreOffice’s most important features and concepts.

The ODF and ePub versions are editable so could be tailored for a specific organisation or group.

See https://blog.documentfoundation.org/blog/2018/09/17/documentation-getting-started-guide-6-0-released/

#libreoffice

Post has attachment
Open source plays vital role in scientific advances in medicine and science

While the open source movement initially came into being as a way to "democratise" software development, it is now playing an increasingly important role in the development of cutting-edge technologies in a wide range of non-IT fields, including medicine and science.

For example, researchers from Chile, who have just been awarded the 2018 PLOS Open Source Toolkit Channel Prize, relied heavily on open source software and hardware for the development of a low-cost fluorescent imaging system.

This system can be used in a wide range of fields including laboratory medicine, pharmacology, environmental biology and molecular biology to image assays. It could also be used in an educational environment for the teaching of biology.

In their article, the researchers make the point that following the impact of free and open source software in software development, open hardware will accelerate hardware development in a similar manner, enabling laboratories around the world to design and make their own equipment.

They believe these designs could replace commercial scientific instrumentation with self-manufacturing, lowering costs by over 90%. This is precisely what happened when they used open source tools to develop their imaging system.

See https://www.itweb.co.za/content/DZQ58MVJOYmMzXy2

Post has attachment
How To Install And Remove Software In Ubuntu [Complete Guide]

This detailed guide shows you various ways to install applications in Ubuntu Linux and it also demonstrates how to remove installed software in Ubuntu.

Generally, new users should try stick to the easy to use Ubuntu Software Center to start with, as after you start adding PPAs (to get beta and latest releases) you can find a few packages breaking sometimes.

Good to see at the end of the article there is a brief mention of AppImages and Ubuntu's Snaps which contain everything an app needs in a Snap or AppImage (which means if some apps are relying on older or newer library files it does not disturb anything else).

See https://itsfoss.com/remove-install-software-ubuntu/

#ubuntu

Post has attachment

Post has attachment
25 things that are better because of Linux (and open source)

The original date of this post (5 Feb 2018) marked 25 years since Linus Torvalds shared the first iteration of a free, hobby operating system that he had developed via a short Usenet post. Of course, what became known as Linux is now far, far more than a hobbyist’s OS and spawned a wave of innovation that significantly changed the IT landscape. Bigger than just Linux (which is pretty big by itself), however, this movement birthed the open source movement, where like-minded communities of individuals could freely develop and share what would become the IT foundation of the future.

As we celebrate the 20th anniversary of the term open source, the underpinnings of open source, from transparency and collaboration to freedom and broad dissemination, have spilled out well beyond the confines of enterprise technology to greatly impact both the world of consumer technology as well as the global business climate at large.

Open source has impacted so much that it’s hard to pick out a handful of the most critical innovations, but we’ve tried. Here are 25 things that are better thanks to Linux and open source; some of these may not exist without an open source backbone, while others may have evolved out of necessity, but would likely be unrecognizable to today’s counterparts.

I wonder what goes through Linus' mind as he reads lists like this... talk about a lasting legacy...

See https://www.redhat.com/en/blog/25-things-are-better-because-of-linux-and-open-source-0

Post has attachment
BerryBoot v2.0 - boot into different Linux distros from a single SD card/drive for ARM computers like the Raspberry Pi

For people short on SD cards: Berryboot is a simple boot selection screen for ARM computers like the Raspberry Pi, that allows you to put multiple Linux distributions on a single SD card. In addition, it allows you to put the operating system files on an external USB hard drive instead of on the SD card itself.

See how to do this at https://www.berryterminal.com/doku.php/berryboot

#berryboot

Post has attachment
OBS Studio - open source broadcaster video editing in real-time for Linux, Windows and Mac

It may be a relatively niche market, but not all video editing is done in post-production. There are use cases for live, on-the-fly video editing and basic compositing. You've seen it done yourself, whether you realize it or not—news broadcasts, live webcasts, and live TV events usually use multiple-camera setups controlled by one central software suite.

OBS Studio (formerly Open Broadcaster Software) is an open source central control room for live, real-time video editing. It features instant encoding using x264 (an open source h.264 encoder) and AAC and streams to services like YouTube, DailyMotion, Twitch, your own streaming server, or just to a file.

If your studio set up has two cameras, then create two sources within the scene. Sources can be nearly any kind of media you can imagine: still images on your hard drive, webcam feeds, JACK inputs, video files, and more. For example, to add a video camera as a source, click the plus button under the Sources window and select Video Capture Device (V4L2).

See https://opensource.com/life/15/12/real-time-linux-video-editing-with-obs-studio or their website at https://obsproject.com/

#obs

Post has attachment
Flatpak 1.0 Released with ‘Significant Improvements’ - it is a cross-distribution app packaging and distribution format for Linux distros

Flatpak, the Linux app distribution format, has finally hit version 1.0, more than three years after its first public release. As is befitting such a major milestone Flatpak 1.0 boasts ‘significant improvement in performance and reliability’, a swathe of bug fixes, and a number of new features.

Flatpak is a free, open-source and cross-distribution app packaging and distribution format. It allows software developers to package their apps for install on pretty much any Linux distribution out there.

The tech has proven a big hit with Linux desktop users, distro makers, and app developers alike.

Major distros like Linux Mint, Arch Linux and Fedora include Flatpak integration out-of-the-box, well-known software like GIMP, Spotify, Skype, LibreOffice and Firefox are readily available as Flatpak apps; and the number of apps available on Flathub, the quasi-official Flatpak app store, continues to grow.

Notable improvements to Flatpak are:
- It will now ask you to approve app permissions when you install an app
- Faster installation and updates
- Apps can be marked as end-of-life
- A new portal lets apps create sandboxes & restart themselves after updates
- Apps can export D-Bus services for all D-Bus names they own
- Support for OCI bundles has been updated to the latest specification
- Host TLS certificates are exposed to applications
- Apps can request access the host SSH agent to access remote servers, Git etc
- A new permission to grant X11 access if the user is running in a X11 session
- Peer-to-peer installation (via USB sticks or local network) support

See https://www.omgubuntu.co.uk/2018/08/flatpak-1-0-released-with-significant-improvements

#flatpak
Wait while more posts are being loaded