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I Hear of Sherlock Everywhere
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Arthur Conan Doyle  - 
 
A time-traveling Arthur Conan Doyle? The Spiritualist in him wants to believe.
by Rachel Gosch May 20, 2016 “vague memories in our souls of those misty centuries when the world was in its childhood.” [STUD] In the rise of Victorian-set fiction, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle has lately found a second li...
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LG Boulin

Arthur Conan Doyle  - 
 
The real Sherlock Holmes's London, a report in engravings from Victorian time.

Le véritable Londres de Sherlock Holmes, un reportage en gravures de l'époque victorienne.

gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/bpt…
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Terry Westbrook-Lienert

Arthur Conan Doyle  - 
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Really interesting, thanks!!
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Burt Wolder
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Arthur Conan Doyle  - 
 
Sir Arthur reports he is satisfied with the outcome of his case.  The shirt collars, however, remain a mystery.  (The complete series of these news reports, now concluded, can be found at burtwolder.wordpress.com.)
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Burt Wolder
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Arthur Conan Doyle  - 
 
Sir Arthur appears to consider this monstrous interference from the narrow-minded...
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Love these.  Please keep 'em coming!
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Burt Wolder
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Arthur Conan Doyle  - 
 
Sir Arthur tweets that the end of his case is imminent. He has been quite patient with the glacially slow course of American justice.
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Bad Wilf

Arthur Conan Doyle  - 
 
Details on two new Sherlock books.
One titled "Sherlock:The essential Arthur Conan Doyle adventures" the other is a Sherlock themed colouring book called 'The Mind Palace'.
http://badwilf.com/sherlock-the-essential-arthur-conan-doyle-adventures/
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Burt Wolder
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Arthur Conan Doyle  - 
 
Sir Arthur seems to believe he has been heard, but being understood is something else again...
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Burt Wolder
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Arthur Conan Doyle  - 
 
Remarkable, if true:  Sir Arthur's voice heard once more.  
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Aslan kaplan

Arthur Conan Doyle  - 
 
Toplayabildigim kadar topladim 5 tanesi bitti geriye kalanlari saymadim bile kitap okumaktan nefret eden ben sherlock holmes asigi oldum 🙋
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LG Boulin

Arthur Conan Doyle  - 
 
Elementary my dear Watson.

Published in 1867 Monsieur Lecoq is the third “judicial” novel of the French novelist Émile Gaboriau.

A young French police agent is enquiring about three murders in a hovel, The Poivriere, near the old Barriere d'Italie, between the outer boulevards and the fortifications.

It’s winter night, the Poivriere is standing alone, in a tract of waste ground.

The back door of the hovel open into a small garden. In this sheltered enclosure the snow had not melted, and upon its white surface the dark stains of numerous footprints presented themselves.

This is the Lecoq’s modus operandi :

Quick in his motions, and understanding how to maneuvre the lantern in accordance with his wishes, the young police agent explored the surroundings in a very short space of time.

A bloodhound in pursuit of his prey would have been less alert, less discerning, less agile.

He came and went, now turning, now pausing, now retreating, now hurrying on again without any apparent reason ; he scrutinized, he questioned every surrounding object : the ground, the logs of wood, the blocks of stone, in a word, nothing escaped his glance. For a moment he would remain standing, then fall upon his knees, and at times lie flat upon his stomach with his face so near the ground that his breath must have melted the snow. He had drawn a tape-line from his pocket, and using it with a carpenter's dexterity, he measured, measured, and measured.

And all his movements were accompanied with the wild gestures of a madman, interspersed with oaths or short laughs, with exclamations of disappointment or delight.

After a quarter of an hour of this strange exercise, he placed the lantern on a stone, wiped his hands with his pocket-handkerchief, and said : Now I know everything !

«This expanse of earth covered with snow is a white page upon which the people we are in search of have written, not only their movements, their goings, and comings, but also their secret thoughts, their alternate hopes and anxieties. What do these footprints say to you ? To me they are alive like the persons who made them; they breathe, speak, accuse !

These are the facts as I have read them. When the murderer repaired to the Poivriere with the two women, his companion—I should say his accomplice— came here to wait. He was a tall man of middle age ; he wore a soft hat and a shaggy brown overcoat ; he was, moreover, probably married, or had been so, as he had a wedding-ring on the little finger of his right hand. »

Lecoq explains his deductions :

«I told you that the man was of middle age. It was not difficult to see that after one had examined his heavy, dragging step. I told you that he was tall--an easy matter. When I saw that he had been leaning upon that block of granite there to the left, I measured the block in question. It is almost five feet five inches in height, consequently a man who could rest his elbow upon it must be at least six feet high. The mark of his hand proves that I am not mistaken. On seeing that he had brushed away the snow which covered the plank, I asked myself what he had used; I thought that it might be his cap, and the mark left by the peak proves that I was right. Finally, if I have discovered the color and the material of his overcoat, it is only because when he wiped the wet board, some splinters of the wood tore off a few tiny flakes of brown wool, which I have found, and which will figure in the trial. »

Elementary my dear Watson.
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LG Boulin

Arthur Conan Doyle  - 
 
Quelque ressemblance... A striking resemblance...

Un dessin de Charles Altamont Doyle, dans les années 1880. A drawing of Charles Altamont Doyle, in the 1880s.
 
Une gravure parisienne de Charles Meyron, en 1865, la même inspiration fantastique...
A Parisian engraving of Charles Meyron, in 1865, the same fantastic inspiration…
 
 
Charles Altamont, le père de Conan Doyle, sombra dans l’alcoolisme et la folie et fut interné en asile psychiatrique jusqu’à sa mort.
 
Charles Meryon, officier de marine et  graveur français, fut lui aussi interné à l’asile de Charenton pour maladies mentales, où il fut soigné par le docteur Gachet (le même qui soigna Van Gogh). Il y décéda à 46 ans.
 
Deux dessins, deux hommes voulant s’échapper de leur réalité psychotique en donnant forme à leurs fantasmes et leur angoisse.
 
Quant à Conan Doyle, n’oublions pas que, fidèle lecteur d’Edgar Poe, il écrivit de nombreux récits fantastiques.
 
 
Charles Altamont, Conan Doyle’s father, get into alcohol and was interned for madness in an asylum.
 
Charles Meryon, son of an English physician, naval officer and French engraver, was also interned in the asylum of Charenton for mental illness, where he was cared by doctor Gachet (the same one who take care of Van Gogh). He died there 46 years old.
 
Two drawings, two men wanting to escape from their psychotic reality by giving visual form to their fantasies and their anguish.
 
As for the fantasy, remember that Conan Doyle, faithful reader of Edgar Poe, wrote numerous fantastic tales.

http://peccadille.net/2015/04/14/charles-meryon-et-paris-entre-realisme-et-fantastique/
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LG Boulin

Arthur Conan Doyle  - 
 
The missing link, old Tabaret, an ancestor of Sherlock Holmes


« Gaboriau had rather attracted me by the neat dovetailing of his plots, and Poe's masterful detective, M. Dupin, had from boyhood been one of my heroes. »

Conan Doyle so reveals us, in his autobiography, both Sherlock Holmes’s literary ancestors.

Edgar Poe is famous and all his readers read The Murders in the Rue Morgue, and The Purloined Letter, where intervenes splendidly the knight Dupin.

Less known is the French writer Émile Gaboriau with his inspector Lecoq of the Police of Paris, in The Lerouge case, published in 1866 and considered as the first detective novel.

Sherlock Holmes was ungrateful. He considered Dupin as «a very inferior fellow », and treated Lecoq « a miserable bungler ». Watson, in these comments, had judged Holmes very conceited.

Yet it misses a third ancestor whom Conan Doyle, as Sherlock Holmes, forget to mention : old Tabaret, nicknamed Tirauclair.

Who is old Tabaret ?

Old Tabaret is the mentor of inspector Lecoq, the one who taught to him to lead a thorough investigation by the deductive method.
He appears for the first time in the case of the murder of the widow Lerouge where he discovered the murderer.

It is quite amazing that neither Doyle, nor Holmes does mention old Tabaret, while both knew Lecoq.

More amazing …

By the features of old Tabaret, here is what we discover in Émile Gaboriau’s novels :

Old Tabaret is a consultant detective who collaborates with the police, represented by police chief Gévrol, rather obtuse character and specialist in false leads.

Does not it remind us Sherlock Homes and inspector Lestrade?...
What old Tabaret is looking for ?

“He wants to lift the most impervious veils, to see through every plot, to divine what is kept hidden, to know exactly the value of a man, the price of a conscience.”

Is not it the same motivation of Holmes, who should enjoy to remove the roofs of London to peep in the strange coincidences and the wonderfull chains of events ?...

Could we learn more about this curious investigator and his possible similarities with Sherlock ?

Old Tabaret read all the memories of the famous policemen of his time as well as the reports and the famous trials.

Just like Sherlock whose knowledge in sensational literature was immense.

He uses all the information available to him, in particular the general biographies of famous men of the century.
Sherlock's library was constituted by the same books.

He solved cases one does not knew, as that of the banker’s wife who had stolen herself. Exactly as Sherlock Holmes's untold stories.

He complains about the century misfortunes :

« The misfortune is, that the art is becoming lost. Great crimes are now so rare. The race of strong fearless criminals has given place to the mob of vulgar pick-pockets. The few rascals who are heard of occasionally are as cowardly as foolish. They sign their names to their misdeeds, and even leave their cards lying about. There is no merit in catching them. Their crime found out, you have only to go and arrest them. »

As well Sherlock who said to Watson :

« There are no crimes and no criminals in these days. There is no crime to detect, or, at most, some bungling villainy with a motive so transparent that even a Scotland Yard official can see through it. »

How works old Tabaret ?

He has a principle : « always distrust appearances ; believe precisely the contrary of what appears true, or even probable. »

Recall Sherlock Holmes : « When you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth. »

Old Tabaret pratice a method of analysis and induction, and claims : « with the help of one single fact, to be able to reconstruct all the details of an assassination, as a savant pictures an antediluvian animal from a single bone ».

Holmes give us the name of this savant :

« As Cuvier could correctly describe a whole animal by the contemplation of a single bone, so the observer who has thoroughly understood one link in a series of incidents should be able to accurately state all the other ones, both before and after. »

Finally, this consulting detetive has a unique way of presenting his deductions :

« I have solved the riddle. It is all clear now, and as plain as noon-day. He is a young man, a little above the middle height, elegantly dressed. He wore on that evening a high hat. He carried an umbrella, and smoked a trabucos cigar in a holder. »


In front of such clues the doubt is no longer allowed. Conan Doyle reading Émile Gaboriau's novels was inspired by old Tabaret. Sherlock Holmes, whose mother was French, so inherited some literary French genes.

Moreover Conan Doyle, whose mother’s family was of Norman origin, maybe hints at old Tabaret in his autobiography :

« What should I call the fellow ? One rebelled against the elementary art which gives some inkling of character in the name, and creates Mr. Sharps or Mr. Ferrets. First it was Sherringford Holmes ; then it was Sherlock Holmes. »

Yet old Tabaret has a nickname : Tirauclair.

« Tire au clair », « clear up » is a meaning French expression, which gives some inliking of character in the name.

Could this be a Conan Doyle’s statement ?

LG Boulin
(reverso - google traduction)


le chaînon manquant, le père Tabaret, un ancêtre de Sherlock Holmes

« Gaboriau m'attirait par la construction impeccable de ses intrigues, et Dupin, le maître détective d'Edgar Poe, était depuis mon enfance un de mes héros favoris. »

Conan Doyle nous révèle ainsi, dans son autobiographie, les deux ancêtres littéraires de Sherlock Holmes.

Edgar Poe est célèbre et tous ses lecteurs ont lu Double assassinat dans la rue Morgue, et La Lettre volée, où intervient brillamment le chevalier Dupin.

Moins connu est l’écrivain français Émile Gaboriau avec son inspecteur Lecoq de la Sûreté de Paris, dans L’affaire Lerouge, éditée en 1866 et considérée comme le premier roman policier.

Sherlock Holmes, lui, était peu reconnaissant. Il considérait Dupin comme un collègue « très inférieur « et traitait Lecoq de « misérable bousilleur ». Watson, à ces commentaires, avait jugé Holmes complètement imbu de lui-même.

Il manque pourtant un troisième ancêtre que Conan Doyle, comme Sherlock Holmes, oublient de mentionner : le père Tabaret, surnommé Tirauclair.

Qui est le père Tabaret ?

Le père Tabaret est le mentor de l’inspecteur Lecoq, celui qui lui a appris à mener une enquête rigoureuse par la méthode déductive.

Il apparaît pour la première fois dans l’affaire de l’assassinat de la veuve Lerouge où il découvrit le meurtrier.
Il est étonnant que ni Doyle, ni Holmes, ne mentionnent le père Tabaret alors que tous deux connaissaient Lecoq.

Plus étonnant, en faisant le portrait du père Tabaret, voici ce que nous découvrons dans les romans d’Émile Gaboriau :

Le père Tabaret est un détective consultant qui collabore avec la police, représentée par le commisaire Gévrol, personnage assez obtus, spécialiste des fausses pistes.

Cela ne nous rappelle-t-il pas un certain Sherlock Holmes et l’inspecteur Lestrade ?...

Que cherche le père Tabaret ?

Il cherche à « soulever les voiles les plus épais, à étudier l’envers de toutes les trames, à deviner ce qu’on ne lui avoue pas, savoir au juste la valeur des hommes, le prix des consciences. »

N’est-ce pas là la préoccupation majeure d’Holmes, sa motivation profonde, lui qui aurait aimer soulever les toits de Londres pour découvrir les étranges coïncidences, la merveilleuse chaîne des événements ?...

Pourrions-nous en apprendre plus sur ce curieux enquêteur et ses ressemblances éventuelles avec Sherlock ?

Le père Tabaret a lu tous les mémoires des policiers célèbres de son temps ainsi que les rapports et les procès fameux.

Tout comme Sherlock dont la connaissance en littérature policière était immense.

Le père Tabaret utilise toutes les informations à sa disposition, notamment les biographies générales des hommes célèbres du siècle. La bibliothèque de Sherlock était constituée des mêmes livres.

Il a résolu des affaires dont on ignore tout, comme celle de la femme du banquier qui s’était volée elle-même. Exactement comme les affaires inédites de Sherlock Holmes.

Il se plaint des malheurs du siècle :

« Le malheur est que l’art se perd et se rapetisse. Les beaux crimes deviennent rares. La race forte des scélérats sans peur a fait place à la tourbe de nos filous vulgaires. Les quelques coquins qui font parler d’eux de loin en loin sont aussi bêtes que lâches. Ils signent leur crime et ont soin de laisser traîner leur carte de visite. Il n’y a nul mérite à les pincer. Le coup constaté, on n’a qu’à aller les arrêter tout droit. »

Tout autant que Sherlock qui déclare à Watson :

« Il n’y a plus de crimes ni de criminels de nos jours. Aucun crime à résoudre, tout au plus quelque affaire crapuleuse, avec un mobile si évident que même un inspecteur de Scotland Yard ne pourrait ne pas le voir. »

Comment travaille le père Tabaret ?

Il a un principe : « se défier des apparences, croire précisément le contraire de ce qui paraîtra vrai ou seulement vraisemblable. »

Rappelons nous Sherlock Holmes : « Quand vous avez éliminé l’impossible, ce qu’il reste, tout aussi improbable soit-il, doit être la vérité. »

Le père Tabaret pratique une méthode d’analyse et d’induction, et « prétend avec un seul fait reconstruire toutes les scènes d’un assassinat, comme le savant qui sur un os rebâtissait les animaux perdus. »

Holmes nous donne le nom de ce savant :

« Comme Cuvier pouvait décrire l’animal entier par l’observation d’un seul de ses os, ainsi l’observateur, qui a découvert le lien marquant dans une série d’incidents, est à même de remonter toute la chaîne de l’événement, avant et après. »

Enfin, ce détective consultant a une manière unique de présenter ses déductions :

« Je tiens la chose. C’est tiré au clair maintenant et simple comme bonjour. L’assassin est arrivé ici avant neuf heures et demie, c’est-à-dire avant la pluie. C’est un homme encore jeune, d’une taille au peu au-dessus de la moyenne, élégamment vêtu. Il portait, ce soir-là un chapeau à haut de forme, il avait un parapluie et fumait un trabucos avec un porte-cigare. »


Devant de tels indices le doute n’est plus permis. Conan Doyle, en lisant les romans d’Émile Gaboriau, s’est inspiré du père Tabaret. Sherlock Holmes, dont la mère était française, a ainsi hérité de quelques gènes français littéraires.

D’ailleurs Conan Doyle, dont la famille maternelle était d’origine normande, fait peut-être une allusion au père Tabaret dans son autobiographie :

« Comment allais-je appeler mon personnage ? Je trouvais bien trop facile de le dépeindre par un nom imagé, comme M. Laffuté ou M. Furet. Ce fut d’abord Sherringford Holmes ; puis Sherlock Holmes. »

Or le père Tabaret a un surnom : Tirauclair. Un nom imagé pour dépeindre ce personnage.

Serait-ce là un aveu de Conan Doyle ?
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Al Clark

Arthur Conan Doyle  - 
 
An undersea adventure ...
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Burt Wolder
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Arthur Conan Doyle  - 
 
Sir Arthur believes his unprecedented appearance has silenced skeptics.  
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Burt Wolder
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Arthur Conan Doyle  - 
 
Sir Arthur sees the heavy hands of his adversaries in what he describes as "this latest blackhearted development."
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Burt Wolder
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Arthur Conan Doyle  - 
 
Sir Arthur has no fond words for witchcraft as he posts the attached story.
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Ha!  Yes, there is a decided resemblance to the beautiful and much-missed Natasha Richardson.  It must surely be a coincidence...
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Aslan kaplan

Arthur Conan Doyle  - 
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Burt Wolder
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Arthur Conan Doyle  - 
 
Sir Arthur observes "these Americans seem highly distractible" as the Labor Day holiday comes and goes in Tweenhauken.
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Burt Wolder
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Arthur Conan Doyle  - 
 
The beyond appears to present challenges to map-makers in this latest update from @A_Conan_Doyle.
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Google Maps can't even find the island of Uffa, never mind the Great Beyond. As Bugs Bunny would say, "I knew I shoulda taken that left turn at the Great Alkali Plain."
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