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Fabiana Bueno

Discussion  - 
 
 The study found that two genes, SCHIP1 and PDE8A, are associated with measures of human facial size.
 
GENE for human facial development 
- Why the Long Face? New Study Uncovers Genes Regulating Your Appearance - by http://www.genengnews.com
An international team of researchers led by a University of Colorado School of Medicine scientist has identified two significant genes associated with measures of human facial size and has identified 10 additional candidates for location of genes affecting human facial shape.
"Gene discovery for human facial development is an important first step for both diagnosing and treating craniofacial syndromes such as cleft palate, and for developing forensic modeling of the human face," said Richard A. Spritz, M.D., Professor and Director of the Human Medical Genetics and Genomics Program at the CU School of Medicine on the Anschutz Medical Campus.
ABOUT THE IMAGE (according the article): Gene discovery for human facial development is an important first step for both diagnosing and treating craniofacial syndromes such as cleft palate, and for developing forensic modeling of the human face.
- read more:
http://www.genengnews.com/gen-news-highlights/genes-linked-to-facial-morphology-identified/81253134/
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Judy Johnson's profile photo
 
Thought that was just hereditary !!! Thanks
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Science Lover

Discussion  - 
 
This video helps us realize where we stand in the vast cosmic arena...pls share if you enjoyed

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c.s. briar

Discussion  - 
 
Play along with this week's puzzler!
 
An ideal fluid is flowing with a speed of 12 cm/s through a pipe of diameter 5 cm. The pipe splits into three smaller pipes, each with a diameter of 2 cm. What is the speed of the fluid in the smaller pipes?
(Assume we are on earth at sea level)

Winners announced Wednesday!
Put your answer in the comments. Come up with your answer BEFORE reading comments!
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Kate Stone

Discussion  - 
 
Following the discovery of an exoplanet orbiting three suns, amateur astronomer Luigi Papagno compares and contrasts astronomy fact with fiction. http://www.gotscience.org/2016/08/multi-sun-system-discovery/ 
Earth orbits a single sun, but astronomers have discovered an exoplanet orbiting around not one, but three, suns. This type of solar system is very rare.
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Larry Panozzo's profile photo
 
No way I was just talking about Nightfall to my physics friends just 1 hour ago!!!
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Brian Si

Discussion  - 
 
Is Earthly life premature from a cosmic perspective?

http://flip.it/eNZB9
The universe is 13.8 billion years old, while our planet formed just 4.5 billion years ago. Some scientists think this time gap means that life on other planets could be billions of years older than ours. However, new theoretical work suggests that present-day life is actually premature from a cosmic perspective. "If you ask, 'When is life most likely to emerge?' you might naively say, 'Now,'" says lead author Avi Loeb of the Harvard-Smithsoni...
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Neha Bansal

Discussion  - 
 
 
comes in two sizes 13.3 and 12.5 inches. This is just the one spec. That is same with Apple MacBook Air is coming in 13.3-inch and interestingly
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A long-lived part of nuclear waste, it takes more than 210,000 years for half of any amount of technetium to decay away. It is also able to migrate, either moving through groundwater or becoming a gas when heated. Heat is an issue because technetium-containing waste and special chemicals are heated to yield solid glass logs for long-term storage. Scientists would prefer the technetium stay in the logs. Researchers devised a way to retain more technetium by adding cobalt. Mixed with an iron oxide, the cobalt helps stabilize technetium. The result? The modified glass marks a 50 to 60 percent increase in the amount of technetium held over baseline glass formulas. Learn more at http://goo.gl/nr0ayv.
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Microbes account for a third of all planetary biomass and play vital roles in both sustaining human life and global ecosystems. Despite the importance of microbes and the habitats they affect, scientists struggle to understand how the metabolisms of these collaborative organisms connect to form cooperative communities. Specifically, how do microbes work together to acquire energy and nutrients from the environment? New research proposes a novel way to model and predict the metabolic interactions across species in microbial communities. Read more at http://goo.gl/N12nEQ.
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Atmospheric scientists developed a novel three-dimensional particle representation for aerosol modeling, resolving particle size, the amount of the black carbon in the particle, and the particle's ability to attract moisture. The novel approach improves model predictions of how the particles handle sunlight energy and which will become cloud seeds. Read more at https://goo.gl/0mKkUg.
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Science, scientific theory and thoughts - technology - share your thoughts and discoveries with the Science community.

ULg Reflexions

Discussion  - 
 
#ASTHMA #MEDICINE - The #eosinophils that contribute to inflammation and exacerbation of the #asthmatic response had been known to scientists for some time. But another type of eosinophil has been discovered that, to the great surprise of Researchers at the University of Liege’s GIGA research centre, has been shown to play a protective and beneficial role. Their astonishing discovery is published in The Journal of Clinical Investigation.
http://reflexions.ulg.ac.be/en/eosinophils 
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The degradation of soil organic matter by microbes plays an important role in atmospheric carbon levels. A recent study at the +Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) at PNNL examined how soil minerals could affect the stability of microbial proteins, potentially influencing the rate of carbon dioxide release into the atmosphere. The findings shed new light on how protein-mineral interactions could affect degradation rates of soil organic matter. Read more at https://goo.gl/gZEYFB.
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Brian Si

Discussion  - 
 
Space-Time Is Not The Same For Everyone

http://flip.it/k0codq
**Before the Big Bang, space-time as we know it did not exist. So how was it born? The process of creating normal space-time from an earlier state dominated by quantum gravity has been studied for years. Recent analyses suggest a surprising conclusion: not all elementary particles are subject to the same space-time.** Several billion years ago, in the era soon after the Big Bang, the Universe was so dense and so hot that elementary particles f...
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Kranti Gunthoti

Discussion  - 
 
Samatha (7-year-old) talks about gravitational waves, sources of gravitational waves and explains how LIGO directly detected these very small ripples in the fabric of spacetime.
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Geothermal energy plants have the potential to generate electricity to meet much of America’s power needs without emitting greenhouse gases. PNNL researchers are developing an economic way to extract rare earth elements from geothermal fluids, creating an additional revenue stream for geothermal plants and lowering the cost of power production. This novel approach may help meet the high demand for rare earth elements used in many clean energy technologies. Learn more at http://goo.gl/i5Wtcv.
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Brian Si

Discussion  - 
 
US startup Moon Express approved to make 2017 lunar mission

http://flip.it/.npKI
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Sushank Acharya

Discussion  - 
 
Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago have made a new solar cell that converts atmospheric carbon dioxide into a high-energy hydrocarbon.
Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago have made a new solar cell that converts atmospheric carbon dioxide into a high-energy hydrocarbon.
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c.s. briar

Discussion  - 
 
Head over to the Science Minded community to play along with this week's puzzler.
https://plus.google.com/communities/117322498775169945398
(Only answers submitted on the original post will be entered as winners.)
 
SATURDAY SCIENCE PUZZLER
Hydrochloric acid is a corrosive, fuming, poisonous, highly acidic solution of hydrogen chloride (HCl). Sodium hydroxide is a caustic, strongly alkaline compound (NaOH) used in drain cleaners. If ingested, hydrochloric acid corrodes the mucous membranes, esophagus, and stomach causing dysphagia, nausea, circulatory failure and death. Sodium hydroxide, if ingested, will cause vomiting, prostration, and collapse. Why is it that if you mix these two substances in the right proportions before ingesting them you will not have any poisoning symptoms? Include the chemical formula.

If you think you have a great puzzler or riddle that you'd like featured as one our Saturday Science Puzzlers please comment below and I will message you on hangouts about it!

Solution and winner announced Monday evening!

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The secrets of blue-green algae’s rapid growth characteristics are coming to light. Synechococcus 7002 flourishes under intense light, tripling in size to accommodate a rapid expansion of the cellular machinery it uses to build proteins. Most cyanobacteria slow their growth in these conditions and redirect resources to repair damaged cells. But this blue-green algae does chemistry on the fly and grows more rapidly. This is why it is attractive to researchers who want to create better, less expensive biofuels and sustainable bioproducts. Read more at http://goo.gl/wzQVzF.
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Yvonne Thompson

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Terry Burleyson's profile photo
 
I lost my Dad to this horrible diease ........such good news
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