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Why on Earth are we here?
Because, if we were in Space, we wouldn't survive.

Welcome to "Moon the Satellite", a growing astronomy community. I'm Avery Joddy and I founded this community July, 2016. I've been studying astronomy for some time now, and what fascinates me the most is the Moon. I hope you find it as interesting as I do.

I'm about to go over a few rules for posting. Anything un-astronomy related isn't tolerated. Please remember to credit any artists, photographers, articles, websites, astronomers, scientists, etc. You don't need a $20,000 telescope to post pictures. This is a community for all ages, so make sure what you post doesn't have any curse words, and if so, put up a warning.
Advertising your community is totally okay. Infact, I encourage you to. The one rule on that is it must be astronomy related, just like the posts.
Keep in mind Moderators have the right to take down anything if it doesn't follow the rules above, after they have given you a warning. Warnings are to be followed in the next day after posting, or it will be taken down.
I will be watching over the community for any possible moderators. If you are interested, you can apply in this section here. Applying does not mean you are to become a moderator. I will watch over your posts and come back to you in the next few days.

Thank you for your consideration, and I hope you enjoy this community.

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Buenas noches y hasta mañana amigos, que descanseis...
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September 27 2016

Before sunrise, on September 28, 2016, in the east. You might catch it shortly before the sun’s first rays pierce the morning sky. Mercury, the sun’s innermost planet, swings to its greatest elongation on September 28 – its greatest apparent distance from the  sun on our sky’s dome – when it will be 18o west of the sun. For reference, your fist at arm’s length spans about 10o of sky. As luck would have it, on this same date – September 28, before dawn – Mercury will appear beneath the Waning Crescent Moon, as darkness gives way to dawn.

It’ll be extremely difficult to spot Mercury from the temperate regions of the Southern Hemisphere. But try it, especially if you have binoculars that’ll let you sweep along the eastern, predawn horizon.

Assuming that you live at mid-northern latitudes, look for Mercury over the sunrise point on the horizon some 75 minutes (or sooner) before sunrise.

The moon will rise before Mercury does on September 28, so use the bow of the lunar crescent, which points to Mercury lurking close to the horizon. Remember that binoculars help our immensely with any Mercury search, especially if your sky is less than crystal-clear.

Mercury will remain visible in the morning sky for another week or two. If you’re really lucky, you might even spot the conjunction of Mercury with the king planet Jupiter, with the unaided eye or binoculars, before sunrise October 11, 2016.


(earthsky.org)

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September 30, 2016 – you probably won’t see the moon because it’s a New Moon. At its new phase, the moon’s dark side faces Earth, and moreover, the moon hides in the sun’s glare all day long as the new moon pretty much rises and then sets with the sun.

Depending on where you live worldwide, the upcoming new moon ushers in the second of two new moons in September 2016, or the first of two new moons in October 2016. The second of two new moons in one calendar month is sometimes called a Black Moon.

The moon turns new on October 1, at 0:11 Universal Time (12:11 a.m.). Although the new moon happens at the same instant all over the world, the clock time varies by time zone. At our US time zones, the new moon comes on September 30, at 8:11 p.m. EDT, 7:11 p.m CDT, 6:11 p.m MDT and 5:11 p.m PDT. So, for our part of the world, the upcoming new moon on September 30 counts as the second of two September 2016 new moons.

For the world’s Eastern Hemisphere, where the moon turns new on October 1, the upcoming new moon is the first of two October 2016 new moons.

In another day or two, the moon will appear as an extremely slender Waxing Crescent in the western sky after sunset, to mark the birth of the Jewish New Year 5777 A.M. and the Muslim New Year 1438 A.H.




(earthsky.org)
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Monday September 26 2016

Waning Crescent 19% illuminated

Waning Crescent is the lunar phase today. Seen from Earth, illuminated fraction of the Moon surface is 19% and getting smaller. The 25 days old Moon is in Leo.


Moonrise and moonset

Moon rises after midnight to early morning and sets in the afternoon. It is visible in the early morning low to the east.


Upcoming main Moon phases

New Moon in Libra after 4 days on October 1 2016 at 00:12

Full Moon in Aries after 19 days on October 16 2016 at 04:23


Neap tide

There is low ocean tide today. Sun and Moon gravitational forces are not aligned, but meet at big angle, so their combined tidal force is weak.


Lunation 206 / 1159

The Moon is 25 days old. Earth's natural satellite is moving from the second to the final part of current synodic month. This is lunation 206 of Meeus index or 1159 from Brown series.

Length of current synodic month is 2 hours and 24 minutes longer than the mean length of synodic month, but it is still 4 hours and 39 minutes shorter, compared to 21st century longest.

The lunar orbit is getting wider, while the Moon is moving outward the Earth. It will keep this direction for the next 7 days, until it get to the point of next apogee on October 4 2016 at 11:02 in Scorpio.


Distance to Moon

Moon is 237 778 miles away from Earth on this date. Moon moves farther next 7 days until apogee, when Earth-Moon distance will reach 252 339 miles.


Moon after northern standstill

2 days after previous North standstill on September 23 2016 at 16:44 in Gemini, when Moon has reached northern declination of ∠18.475°. Next 11 days the lunar orbit moves southward to face South declination of ∠-18.546° in the next southern standstill on October 8 2016 at 06:03 in Capricorn.




(lunaf.com)

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Harvest Moon Glasgow Scotland



(facebook.com)
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Friday September 16 2016

Full Moon 100% illuminated

Full Moon is the lunar phase today. Seen from Earth, illuminated fraction of the Moon surface is 100%. The 14 days old Moon is in Pisces.


Moonrise and moonset

Moon rises at sunset and sets at sunrise. It is visible all night and it is high in the sky around midnight.

It is Harvest Moon

The Full Moon this days is the Harvest of September 2016.


Spring tide

There is high Full Moon ocean tide today. Combined Sun and Moon gravitational tidal force working on Earth is strong, because of the Sun-Earth-Moon syzygy alignment.

Lunation 206 / 1159

The Moon is 14 days old. Earth's natural satellite is moving through the middle part of current synodic month. This is lunation 206 of Meeus index or 1159 from Brown series.

The lunar orbit is getting closer, while the Moon is moving inward the Earth. It will keep this direction for the next 2 days, until it get to the point of next perigee on September 18 2016 at 17:00 in Aries.

Distance to Moon

Moon is 230 445 miles away from Earth on this date. Moon moves closer next 2 days until perigee, when Earth-Moon distance will reach  224 871 miles.

Sun-Earth-Moon syzygy

The Moon is in Full Moon geocentric opposition with the Sun today and this alignment forms Sun-Earth-Moon syzygy.





(lunaf.com)
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It is not a full moon, but it was still beautiful to watch in the sky this evening. #moon  
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People love information. I LOVE INFORMATION. I may not understand it all, but that is what's great about communities online with members who share the same interests! In looking for who or what 'Meeus index' is, in relation to the Moon, I found out.

Jean Meeus , born in December 1928, studied mathematics at the University of Louvain ( Leuven ) in Belgium , where he received the Degree of Licentiate in 1953. From then until his retirement in 1993, he was a meteorologist at Brussels Airport . His special interest is spherical and mathematical astronomy. He is a member of several astronomical associations and the author of many scientific papers. He is co-author of Canon of Solar Eclipses (1966), the Canon of Lunar Eclipses (1979) and the Canon of Solar Eclipses (1983). His Astronomical Formulae for Calculators (1979, 1982,1985 and 1988) has been widely acclaimed by both amateur and professional astronomers. Further works, published by Willmann-Bell, Inc., are Elements of Solar Eclipses 1951-2200 (1989),Transits (1989), Astronomical Algorithms (1991 and 1998), Astronomical Tables of the Sun , Moon and Planets (1983 and 1995), Mathematical Astronomy Morsels (1997), More Mathematical Astronomy Morsels (2002), and Mathematical Astronomy III (2004) . For his numerous contributions to astronomy the Inter­ national Astronomical Union announced in 1981 the naming of asteroid 2213 Meeus in his honor.

About Mathematical Astronomy Morsels V 

In 1997 Jean Meeus wrote Mathematical Astronomical Morsels a collection of about 60 chapters on various aspects of mathematical astronomy that were independent of one another and that could be read in any order. Each were updated versions of articles written at different times and for several different European and Canadian journals, principally Heelal, the monthly journal of the Belgian Dutch-language astronomical society ‘Vereniging voor Sterrenkunde’ (VVS).

Five years later (2002) More Mathematical Astronomical Morsels appeared with 75 chapters divided into six categories: The Moon, Eclipses and Occultations, Planetary Motions, Planetary Phenomena, On the Celestial Sphere and Varia.

Two years later (2004) Mathematical Astronomy Morsels  III  was published with 57 chapters divided into six categories:  The Moon, Eclipses, Planetary Motions, Planetary Phenomena, On the Celestial Sphere and Varia.

Three years later (2007) Mathematical Astronomy Morsels IV appeared and Jean Meeus wrote “To our surprise, there are still more interesting subjects in the field of mathematical astronomy, whence this fourth collection of Morsels.” Morsels IV contains 68 chapters divided into six categories: The Moon, Eclipses, Occultations, Planetary Motions, Planetary Phenomena and Varia.

And now, just two years later (2009) Mathematical Astronomy Morsels V! Here Jean Meeus writes “Since the publication of our 4th Morsels book, we have accumulated a lot of new and interesting subjects in the field of mathematical astronomy, and there were enough of them to fill this fifth collection of Morsels. Apparently, an infinite number of possible topics do remain”. 

Morsels V contains 69 chapters divided into six categories: The Moon, Eclipses and Occultations, Planetary Phenomena and Varia. Additionally there is a cumulative Index for all five volumes along with corrections to Morsels I and IV.

In the first book of this series Roger Sinnott probably has written the best description of the Jean Meeus’ work:

“Many celestial cycles are fleeting, destined to fade away after a few iterations as others overlap them or start up afresh. It is a fallacy to think that you can recreate planetary motions for many years by spinning back or fast-forwarding a planetarium projector. Only someone with a profound grasp of astronomical motions and relationships could have produced an authoritative book like this.

“Some readers will see here an antidote to the claims of astrology. Others will gain a deep insight into the misuse of statistics, especially in such areas as the sunspot cycle and its relation to weather on Earth. But all of us can acquire plenty of ammunition to settle bets at star parties, test computer programs, and amaze our friends (or an astronomy professor) with some little-known surprises about the sky and calendar.

“So why exactly does Christmas fall more often on a Tuesday than on a Monday? How many centuries will elapse before 10 successive Easters occur in April? What is the reason that total solar eclipses are more common for observers in the Northern Hemisphere than in the Southern? Turn thes pages in the first Mossels, and you’ll find out!” So you will find equally interesting in Morsels V.

The asteroid 2213 Meeus was named after him by the International Astronomical Union in 1981 for his contributions to the field.

Jean Meeus is now retired and his main interest is mathematical astronomy (eclipses, occultations, planetary positions and phenomena, asteroids).
He likes classical music and has no interest for sport.



(http://willbell.com)

(http://britastro.org)



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