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This research can put your mouth movements and expressions on a video of some else's face in real time. Amazing! It is getting very difficult to know what is real and what is not.

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Research on using common metal catalysts for any ficial photosynthesis to produce hydrogen.

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It is possible to create solar cells that split hydrogen out of water for use in fuel cells. Currently these cells are inefficient and impractical. This article discusses a new type of anode that has the potential to make such solar cells practical.

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Alzheimer's is such a debilitating disease. This and other theories are being tested to help us find solutions.

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DNA nanobots will target cancer cells in the first human trial using a terminally ill patient

'... Professor Ido Bachelet of Israel’s Bar-Ilan University confirms that while tiny robots being injected into a human body to fight disease might sound like science fiction, it is in fact very real.

[...]

Nanobots are actually made from DNA, specifically a single strand of DNA folded into a desired shape. Bachelet’s nanobots are designed in a clamshell shape, and work as a carrier for existing cancer drugs. Think of them like a protective box. They’ve been programmed to be in two states—an “off” position, where they’re closed tightly so they can bypass healthy cells without causing any damage, and an “on” position, where the clamshell opens up to expose cancerous cells to the drug in question.

[...]

Nanobots can also have multiple “payloads” in them, and can be programmed so that they know which drug to expose to specific molecules. This means that nanobots work well in combination therapy—where multiple drugs are used at once—and can be timed so that the different drugs don’t interfere with one another. As of December 2014, the nanobots that Bechelet’s team have developed can recognize 12 different types of cancerous cells.

Currently, the team is also working on instilling their nanobots with “swarm behaviour” and have figured out how to get the bots to build physical bridges with each other. This would allow them to fix tissue from one end to the other, guiding the regrowth of cells across a larger area, which could be helpful in repairing spinal cords or long sections of muscle.
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http://www.theplaidzebra.com/dna-nanobots-will-target-cancer-cells-in-the-first-human-trial-using-a-terminally-ill-patient/

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VertiGo - A Wall-Climbing Robot Including Ground-Wall Transition - YouTube

'... VertiGo is a wall-climbing robot that is capable of transitioning from the ground to the wall, created in collaboration between Disney Research Zurich and ETH. The robot has two tiltable propellers that provide thrust onto the wall, and four wheels. One pair of wheels is steerable, and each propeller has two degrees of freedom for adjusting the direction of thrust. By transitioning from the ground to a wall and back again, VertiGo extends the ability of robots to travel through urban and indoor environments.

The robot is able to move on a wall quickly and with agility. The use of propellers to provide thrust onto the wall ensures that the robot is able to traverse over indentations such as masonry. The choice of two propellers rather than one enables a floor-to-wall transition - thrust is applied both towards the wall using the rear propeller, and in an upward direction using the front propeller, resulting in a flip onto the wall.
 
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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e9P9_QM8cN8

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Mind-Controlled Robot Suits Help the Paralyzed Move Again | WIRED

'Chances are, your body and brain operate seamlessly with each other. You decide to move your big toe, say, and a split second later, it moves. But even a simple toe-twitch isn’t easy for people who’ve been paralyzed. Which is why Miguel Nicolelis, a neuroengineer at Duke University, has been developing exoskeletons that translate electrical signals from the wearer’s brain into mechanical instructions. Basically, mind-controlled robot suits.'

http://www.wired.com/2015/12/mind-controlled-robot-suits-help-the-paralyzed-move-again/

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A promising battery technology for large scale storage (like a wind farm).
Synthetic batteries for the energy revolution: Chemists present an innovative redox-flow battery based on organic polymers and water -- ScienceDaily

'A team of researchers made a decisive step towards a redox-flow battery which is simple to handle, safe and economical at the same time: They developed a system on the basis of organic polymers and a harmless saline solution. The new redox-flow battery can withstand up to 10,000 charging cycles without losing a crucial amount of capacity.'

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/10/151021135628.htm

An aqueous, polymer-based redox-flow battery using non-corrosive, safe, and low-cost materials : Nature : Nature Publishing Group

'... For renewable energy sources such as solar, wind, and hydroelectric to be effectively used in the grid of the future, flexible and scalable energy-storage solutions are necessary to mitigate output fluctuations1. Redox-flow batteries (RFBs) were first built in the 1940s2 and are considered a promising large-scale energy-storage technology1, 3, 4. A limited number of redox-active materials4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10—mainly metal salts, corrosive halogens, and low-molar-mass organic compounds—have been investigated as active materials, and only a few membrane materials3, 5, 11, 12, 13, 14, such as Nafion, have been considered for RFBs. However, for systems that are intended for both domestic and large-scale use, safety and cost must be taken into account as well as energy density and capacity, particularly regarding long-term access to metal resources, which places limits on the lithium-ion-based and vanadium-based RFB development15, 16. Here we describe an affordable, safe, and scalable battery system, which uses organic polymers as the charge-storage material in combination with inexpensive dialysis membranes, which separate the anode and the cathode by the retention of the non-metallic, active (macro-molecular) species, and an aqueous sodium chloride solution as the electrolyte. This water- and polymer-based RFB has an energy density of 10 watt hours per litre, current densities of up to 100 milliamperes per square centimetre, and stable long-term cycling capability. The polymer-based RFB we present uses an environmentally benign sodium chloride solution and cheap, commercially available filter membranes instead of highly corrosive acid electrolytes and expensive membrane materials.
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http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/vaop/ncurrent/full/nature15746.html
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