Stream

Join this community to post or comment
 
Are hospitals rushing to adopt new technologies before they’ve corrected the security vulnerabilities of existing ones?
1
Add a comment...

Fabiana Bueno

Discussion  - 
 
 DNA circuits have been widely used to develop biological computing devices because of their high programmability and versatility. Here, we propose an architecture for the systematic construction of DNA circuits for analog computation based on DNA strand displacement. The elementary gates in our architecture include addition, subtraction, and multiplication gates. The input and output of these gates are analog, which means that they are directly represented by the concentrations of the input and output DNA strands, respectively, without requiring a threshold for converting to Boolean signals. We provide detailed domain designs and kinetic simulations of the gates to demonstrate their expected performance. On the basis of these gates, we describe how DNA circuits to compute polynomial functions of inputs can be built. Using Taylor Series and Newton Iteration methods, functions beyond the scope of polynomials can also be computed by DNA circuits built upon our architecture. for more: http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/acssynbio.6b00144
 
Duke University NEWS
DNA computers could one day be programmed to diagnose and treat disease
+ https://today.duke.edu/2016/08/analog_DNA_circuit
Often described as the blueprint of life, DNA contains the instructions for making every living thing from a human to a house fly.
But in recent decades, some researchers have been putting the letters of the genetic code to a different use:  making tiny nanoscale computers.
In a new study, a Duke University team led by professor John Reif created strands of synthetic DNA that, when mixed together in a test tube in the right concentrations, form an analog circuit that can add, subtract and multiply as they form and break bonds.
Rather than voltage, DNA circuits use the concentrations of specific DNA strands as signals.
Other teams have designed DNA-based circuits that can solve problems ranging from calculating square roots to playing tic-tac-toe. But most DNA circuits are digital, where information is encoded as a sequence of zeroes and ones.
Instead, the new Duke device performs calculations in an analog fashion by measuring the varying concentrations of specific DNA molecules directly, without requiring special circuitry to convert them to zeroes and ones first.
The researchers describe their approach in the August issue of the journal ACS Synthetic Biology.
Unlike the silicon-based circuits used in most modern day electronics, commercial applications of DNA circuits are still a long way off, Reif said.
For one, the test tube calculations are slow. It can take hours to get an answer.
“We can do some limited computing, but we can’t even begin to think of competing with modern-day PCs or other conventional computing devices,” Reif said.
But DNA circuits can be far tinier than those made of silicon. And unlike electronic circuits, DNA circuits work in wet environments, which might make them useful for computing inside the bloodstream or the soupy, cramped quarters of the cell.
The technology takes advantage of DNA’s natural ability to zip and unzip to perform computations. Just like Velcro and magnets have complementary hooks or poles, the nucleotide bases of DNA pair up and bind in a predictable way.
The researchers first create short pieces of synthetic DNA, some single-stranded and some double-stranded with single-stranded ends, and mix them in a test tube.
When a single strand encounters a perfect match at the end of one of the partially double-stranded ones, it latches on and binds, displacing the previously bound strand and causing it to detach, like someone cutting in on a dancing couple.
The newly released strand can in turn pair up with other complementary DNA molecules downstream in the circuit, creating a domino effect.
The researchers solve math problems by measuring the concentrations of specific outgoing strands as the reaction reaches equilibrium.
To see how their circuit would perform over time as the reactions proceeded, Reif and Duke graduate student Tianqi Song used computer software to simulate the reactions over a range of input concentrations. They have also been testing the circuit experimentally in the lab.
Besides addition, subtraction and multiplication, the researchers are also designing more sophisticated analog DNA circuits that can do a wider range of calculations, such as logarithms and exponentials.
Conventional computers went digital decades ago. But for DNA computing, the analog approach has its advantages, the researchers say. For one, analog DNA circuits require fewer strands of DNA than digital ones, Song said.
Analog circuits are also better suited for sensing signals that don’t lend themselves to simple on-off, all-or-none values, such as vital signs and other physiological measurements involved in diagnosing and treating disease.
The hope is that, in the distant future, such devices could be programmed to sense whether particular blood chemicals lie inside or outside the range of values considered normal, and release a specific DNA or RNA - DNA’s chemical cousin -- that has a drug-like effect.
Reif’s lab is also beginning to work on DNA-based devices that could detect molecular signatures of particular types of cancer cells, and release substances that spur the immune system to fight back.
“Even very simple DNA computing could still have huge impacts in medicine or science,” Reif said.
- Article written by Robin A. Smith
DURHAM, N.C. -- Often described as the blueprint of life, DNA contains the instructions for making every living thing from a human to a house fly. But in recent decades, some researchers have been putting the letters of the genetic code to a different use: making tiny nanoscale computers.
1
Add a comment...

David Harlow
moderator

Discussion  - 
 
Let's deliver telehealth and precision medicine, please, not on-demand rides.
1
Add a comment...
 
Vous n'êtes pas sur Twitter ? Inscrivez-vous, branchez-vous sur les choses que vous aimez et soyez immédiatement au courant de ce qui se passe. S'inscrireSe connecter. Vous ne verrez plus ces genres de Tweets la prochaine fois que vous serez ici. Vous verrez davantage de ces genres de Tweets ...
2
Add a comment...

Belinda Summers

Discussion  - 
 
Marketing is now an indispensable aspect of any business, and healthcare providers are not excluded. They have become more competitive and aggressive throughout the years, and they have gradually shifted from general advertising to targeted marketing.

Discover Why CRM Solutions in the Healthcare Industry are Heaven-sent.
http://goo.gl/vXo8gc


#healthcare #marketing #business
2
Add a comment...

Bryan DeLuca

Discussion  - 
 
 
Lucky for you IEEE Spectrum has released an application that ranks the popularity of a plethora of programming languages.
2
Add a comment...

Rupali Vaitla

Discussion  - 
 
The Global Oxygen Ventilator Market Research Report is a professional and in-depth study on the current state of the Oxygen Ventilator market.
3
Add a comment...

Fabiana Bueno

Discussion  - 
 
  Diabetes is a condition with compromised energy balance and is associated with bone fractures. Some treatment options for diabetes sensitize the patient to insulin via targeting the transcription factor PPARγ. PPARγ is also key regulator of bone formation and bone resorption. Anti-diabetic drugs TZDs target PPARγ protein and this leads to bone loss and increase in fractures in postmenopausal women. Bone mass and energy metabolism share similar regulating pathways, and here we demonstrate a new class of insulin sensitizers that is a selective modulator of PPARγ activity; resulting in a pharmacologic agent that can be beneficial for both diabetes and metabolic bone disease. http://www.ebiomedicine.com/article/S2352-3964(16)30297-3/abstract
 
New Drug Candidate Could Treat Both Type 2 Diabetes and Bone Loss (written By Eric Sauter and Mika Ono)
Highlights
•PPARγ S273 regulates osteoclast differentiation and insulin sensitivity
•PPARγ S112 regulates osteoblast and adipocyte differentiation
•PPARγ and PPARα regulate osteocyte activities of bone formation and turnover
•SR10171, a PPARγ inverse agonist and PPARα weak agonist, is anabolic for bone
- In addition to its more obvious ills, type 2 diabetes is a condition closely associated with bone fractures, increasing the risk of fractures twofold. To make matters worse, certain anti-diabetic drugs further increase this risk, particularly in postmenopausal women, severely limiting their treatment options.
A new study, co-led by Patrick R. Griffin, a professor on the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI), and B. Lecka-Czernik, a professor at the University of Toledo, has shown that a new class of drug candidates developed at TSRI increases bone mass by expanding bone formation (deposition of new bone) and bone turnover (a normal process of replacement of old bone). A proper balance of these two processes is critical to healthy bone maintanence, and this balance is frequently negatively affected in diabetic patients.
The result is a new dual-targeting drug candidate—or, as Griffin describes, “one drug addressing multiple therapeutic indications”—that could treat both diabetes and bone disease. The compound has been referenced as “SR10171.”
The study was published recently online ahead of print by the journal EBioMedicine.
Diabetes affects more than 29 million people in the United States, according to a 2012 report from the American Diabetes Association. Between 2010 and 2012, the incidence rate was about 1.7 to 1.9 million per year, and in 2013, estimated direct medical costs of the disease were $176 billion.
Over the past decade, Griffin and his colleague, TSRI Associate Professor Theodore Kamenecka, have focused on the details of molecules that increase sensitivity to insulin (a hormone that regulates blood sugar). Using newly discovered information, the researchers made significant advances in developing a family of drug candidates that target a receptor known as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors gamma (PPARγ), a key regulator of stem cells controlling bone formation and bone resorption and a master regulator of fat.
Anti-diabetic drugs known as glitazones (TZDs) target the PPARγ protein, but that interaction leads to severe bone loss and increased fractures. Stem cells in the bone marrow can differentiate either into bone cells or fat cells, and the glitazones drive them to fat at the expense of bone.
But SR10171 is designed to avoid this troubling outcome. In animal models treated with the compound, fat formation in the bone marrow was successfully blocked independent of their metabolic state (healthy or diabetic).
- read more:
http://www.scripps.edu/newsandviews/e_20160801/griffin.html
- pdf paper:
http://www.ebiomedicine.com/article/S2352-3964(16)30297-3/pdf
2
Add a comment...

Neenad Sarang

Discussion  - 
 
Oldest secrets of Staying #Healthy by drinking Warm #water explained. Must #Read and #Share
Warm water benefits, unchallenged by experts to prevent Heart Attack, burning of fats, reducing wrinkles, dark circles, detox. Read for happy Life
4
William Bayer's profile photo
 
Although I prefer guzzling water at room temp, many diet books over they years suggested ingesting cold water which caused your body to use calories to get it to body temp...
Add a comment...

Created by

About this community

This is a community for those interested in health information technology
1
Add a comment...

Fabiana Bueno

Discussion  - 
 
  the new device is expected ultimately to look and function very much like existing otoscopes,  instead, uses shortwave infrared light, which can penetrate much deeper.
 
New Medical Device by MIT
A new device developed by researchers at MIT and a physician at Connecticut Children’s Medical Center could greatly improve doctors’ ability to accurately diagnose ear infections. That could drastically reduce the estimated 2 million cases per year in the United States where such infections are incorrectly diagnosed and unnecessary antibiotics are prescribed. Such overprescriptions are considered a major cause of antibiotic resistance.
The new device, whose design is still being refined by the team, is expected ultimately to look and function very much like existing otoscopes, the devices most doctors currently use to peer inside the ear to look for signs of infection. But unlike these conventional devices, which use visible light and can only see a few millimeters into the tissues of the ear, the new device instead uses shortwave infrared light, which can penetrate much deeper.
The findings are being reported this week in the journal PNAS, in a paper by Moungi Bawendi, the Lester Wolfe Professor of Chemistry at MIT; Jessica Carr, an MIT doctoral student; Oliver Bruns, an MIT research scientist; and Tulio Valdez, a pediatric otolaryngologist at Connecticut Children’s Medical Center  and associate professor of otolaryngology at the University of Connecticut.
The one clear diagnostic sign of an infection in the ear is a buildup of fluid behind the eardrum, Carr explains. But the view through a conventional otoscope can’t penetrate deeply enough into the tissues to reveal such buildups. More expensive specialized equipment can offer more information needed for a firm diagnosis, but these tools are usually only available in the offices of specialists, who are not consulted in the vast majority of cases.
“A lot of times, it’s a fifty-fifty guess as to whether there is fluid there,” Carr says. “If there’s no fluid, there’s no chance of an infection. One of the limitations of the existing technology is that you can’t see through the eardrum, so you can’t easily see the fluid. But the eardrum basically becomes transparent to our device.” Fluid within the ear, by contrast, “becomes very dark and very apparent.”
While there are more advanced systems under development that do provide data on these deeper parts of the ear, Carr says, those “haven’t been widely adopted. They’re not familiar to the physicians, who have to use a whole range of technologies in their work. These are something new and unfamiliar, and some of these devices require a trained audiologist to run them.” So the MIT team worked to make the new device as familiar as possible, closely resembling the otoscopes that doctors already use.
“We developed something easy to use, and that wouldn’t require much training,” she says.
Studies have shown that about 8 million children each year in the U.S. are diagnosed with otitis media, the medical term for middle-ear infections, Carr says. These are especially prevalent among young children: About 80 percent of them will have at least one such diagnosis by the age of 3. But the studies show that such diagnoses are correct only 51 percent of the time — “essentially a coin toss,” Carr says.
The roughly 4 million incorrect diagnoses are about evenly split between false positives and false negatives, indicating that about 2 million children every year are incorrectly thought to have such infections, and are prescribed unnecessary antibiotics. Once the presence of an infection is determined, doctors must then try to distinguish between viral and bacterial causes, something this device cannot determine, although it can provide some clues.
After initial successful tests on 10 adult subjects, the team is now in the process of carrying out tests on pediatric patients to confirm the accuracy of the diagnostic results. Assuming the tests go well, the team hopes to commercialize the device. The ultimate cost, Carr says, will depend on the cost of the infrared imaging system — which is finding a variety of applications, including in the self-driving cars being developed by Google and other companies, because of its ability to see through fog and during night time. The cost of those devices, originally developed for military uses, has already fallen drastically over the last couple of years, she says, and widespread production could drop those costs rapidly.
"The potential impact of this work is huge,” says Karina Cañadas, an assistant professor of pediatric otolaryngology at Baylor College of Medicine in Texas, who was not involved in this work. "Ear infections are one of the most common reasons for visits to the pediatrician, but sometimes the view of the middle ear in a wiggly irritated child is not easy, making a good exam not always possible.  With this  technology even a brief exam would be able to detect middle ear fluid more confidently.”
The research was supported by the Laser Biomedical Research Center at MIT funded by the National Institutes of Health, MIT’s Institute for Soldier Nanotechnologies, and the Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

- source and all credit, written by David L. Chandler - MIT News Office
http://news.mit.edu/2016/shortwave-infrared-instrument-ear-infection-0822
Shortwave infrared instrument from MIT could see deeper, help improve diagnosis of ear infections.
1
1
Add a comment...

Ipswitch

Discussion  - 
 
This eBook will help you gain a better understanding of what your executives and auditors expect from you.
This eBook will teach you and your IT team how to stay protected from outside threats and how to prepare for an audit.
1
Add a comment...

Care Directory

Discussion  - 
 
Spina Bifida ( #myelomeningocele ) #Hydrocephalus
Guide for #care homes and nursing homes for #Spina Bifida (myelomeningocele) in UK

https://www.caredirectory.co.uk/search-type/Spina-Bifida-Hydrocephalus
2
Add a comment...

Lorie Ng

Discussion  - 
 
Business is always tied with the word revenue but not all businesses only care about profits. They care for their customers too through their corporate social responsibility.
Here are some examples of great marketing campaigns of several organizations in creating awareness about health.
Here are some of marketing campaigns done by healthcare organizations that created awareness of a disease, educated the public about preventive measures...
2
Add a comment...

Celene Villon

Discussion  - 
 
Prevention is better than cure, even in cybersecurity
Earlier this year, the private healthcare information of over 91,000 Medicaid clients in the United States were compromised. An investigation traced a data breach involving two government employees who turned out to be siblings. According to reports, the two exchanged emails that contained the private healthcare data of the clients. The woman was a medical assistance specialist at the Health Care Authority (HCA) while her brother was an internet ...
4
Add a comment...

David Harlow
moderator

Discussion  - 
 
The latest federal report on health data privacy, security and access
4
Turanga Tohiariki's profile photo
 
NO MONEY IN SHARING?JUS ASKIN,WHY MORE,UZ DIDNT THNK BEFORE POSTIN OR(THEY DDNT)
Add a comment...

David Harlow
moderator

Discussion  - 
 
The latest federal report on health data privacy, security and access
1
Add a comment...