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The human body was made for full body movement: twist, bend, lift and turn, tilt back and sideways ... Do it. Even when you're sitting. Oh, need an excuse? Throw the remote off a bridge and dance around the house with the vacuum cleaner for an hour every day. Be a trend-setter. Be healthy.

"That's the take-home message from a new study from Ezra Fishman, a doctoral candidate in demography at the University of Pennsylvania, and colleagues from Johns Hopkins University, the National Cancer Institute, the National Institute on Aging and others.

Even for people who already exercised, swapping out just a few minutes of sedentary time with some sort of movement was associated with reduced mortality, according to the research, published in the journal Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise.

Fishman, part of Penn's Population Studies Center, and the other researchers looked at data from approximately 3,000 people aged 50 to 79 who participated in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. For the study, subjects wore ultra-sensitive activity trackers, called accelerometers, for seven days, generating data compiled by the CDC. For these same people, the agency then tracked mortality for the next eight years.

The results were striking. The least active people were five times more likely to die during that period than the most active people and three times more likely than those in the middle range for activity.

"When we compare people who exercise the same amount, those who sit less and move around more tend to live longer," said Fishman, the lead author on the paper. "The folks who were walking around, washing the dishes, sweeping the floor tended to live longer than the people who were sitting at a desk." . . . "

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Antigen specific immunotherapy using MHC-peptide nanoparticles induce specific tolerance and control of autoimmunity by inducing TR1 regulatory T cells.
www.nature.com/nature/journal/v530/n7591/full/nature17300.html
Autoimmunity: Antigen-specific immunotherapy
www.nature.com/nature/journal/v530/n7591/full/nature16962.html
Expanding antigen specific regulatory networks to treat autoimmunity
Regulatory T cells hold promise as targets for therapeutic intervention in autoimmunity, but approaches capable of expanding antigen-specific regulatory T cells in vivo are currently not available. Here we show that systemic delivery of nanoparticles coated with autoimmune-disease-relevant peptides bound to major histocompatibility complex class II (pMHCII) molecules triggers the generation and expansion of antigen-specific regulatory CD4+ T cell type 1 (TR1)-like cells in different mouse models, including mice humanized with lymphocytes from patients, leading to resolution of established autoimmune phenomena. Ten pMHCII-based nanomedicines show similar biological effects, regardless of genetic background, prevalence of the cognate T-cell population or MHC restriction. These nanomedicines promote the differentiation of disease-primed autoreactive T cells into TR1-like cells, which in turn suppress autoantigen-loaded antigen-presenting cells and drive the differentiation of cognate B cells into disease-suppressing regulatory B cells, without compromising systemic immunity. pMHCII-based nanomedicines thus represent a new class of drugs, potentially useful for treating a broad spectrum of autoimmune conditions in a disease-specific manner.
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سبحان الله
NGC 2736: The Pencil Nebula
About 5 light-years long and a mere 800 light-years away, the oddly shaped Pencil Nebula (NGC 2736) is a small part of a huge remnant left over after a supernova explosion that took place about 11 000 years ago. The shock wave from the supernova explosion plows through space at over 500,000 kilometers per hour. Initially, the shock wave was moving at millions of kilometers per hour but has slowed considerably, sweeping up surrounding interstellar gas.

Image Credit: ESO
http://www.eso.org/public/images/eso1236a/
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Tycho's Supernova Remnant
When a star reaches the end of its life, it explodes in a supernova that can briefly outshine entire galaxies.* This photograph is of the Tycho supernova remnant and was taken by the Chandra X-ray Observatory. The Tycho supernova remnant is located in the Milky Way, about 13,000 light years from Earth. Astronomers studying the remnants of this stellar explosion (which was famously observed by Tycho Brahe in 1572) discovered a blisteringly fast shock wave that is rushing inward at 1,000 times the speed of sound, lighting up what remains of the powerful cosmic explosion.
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*Exploding stars are called type 1a supernovas, and they may shine as brightly as a billion suns for a short time. Astronomers use these supernovas as a standard for measurement. 
- http://wol.jw.org/en/wol/pc/r1/lp-e/1200275520/38/0

Image Credit: X-ray: NASA/CXC/Rutgers/K. Eriksen et al.; Optical: DSS
http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2011/tycho/
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