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#immigration #uk #visa #spouse  
Minimum Income Requirement (MIR)
In 2012, the government introduced some new measures with regards to the immigration rules. One of which is the Minimum Income Requirement (MIR), which specifies the minimum amount of yearly income a person should earn to qualify as a sponsor for their non-European UK spouse visa application. Read More: http://movingtotheuk.co.uk/minimum-income-requirement-mir

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Extending your UK Spouse Visa
As mentioned in my last post, this post is about extending your UK spouse visa. In the case of one of my friends who brought in to the UK his wife a couple of years ago, she got Indefinite Leave to Remain ( ILR ) after her initial two and a half years visa. Recently though the rules have changed as per this URL: https://www.gov.uk/settle-in-the-uk/y/you-re-the-family-member-of-a-british-citizen/yes/some-other-way/on-a-work-visa/tier-1 Read More: http://movingtotheuk.co.uk/extending-your-uk-spouse-visa

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#immigration #visa #uk  
Indefinite Leave to remain in the UK (ILR)
Now that Natasha is in the UK, it is time to start planning for the time when her two and a half years visa will expire. About 28 days before the visa expires, we will have to make another application from within the UK for an extension. There are many different application types and choosing the right one is important. One type of visa that some of my friends have applied for whilst in the UK on a spouse visa, is the “Indefinite Leave to Remain (ILR)” also knows as “settlement visa”. Obtaining a visa like that means that you are allowed to settle in the UK and are no longer subject to immigration control. Read More: http://movingtotheuk.co.uk/indefinite-leave-to-remain-in-the-uk-ilr

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#UK #immigration #Visa  
Getting the National Insurance Number
Well after we settled down in Poole for a few days, we started thinking about the National Insurance Number Card. You need it to work in the UK. So after a bit of googling around, I found that there were a few ways to do it, but below is the way we did it. Read More: http://movingtotheuk.co.uk/getting-the-national-insurance-number

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Entering UK with Spouse Visa
Ok, So Natasha got her passport with the Spouse Visa in it. Now we needed to get her into the UK from Ukraine. We agreed a Saturday where I would not have to take time off from work, for me to fly to Kiev where she would be waiting for me. I took with me an empty suitcase which in Kiev was to be filled up with Natasha’s clothes... Read More: http://movingtotheuk.co.uk/entering-uk-with-spouse-visa

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Case Study (Legalising your stay)
This is a new twist to this blog. I have come across a success story recently and thought to put it here for others to read and comment. As I come across this success stories, I shall put them here as case studies.
I have a friend who is like me, from Moldova (non-EU country). He came to the UK in 2005 (almost 9 years ago from today). He came on a work visa, but overstayed his visa. He got his National Insurance Number when his work visa was OK, and has been working on that National Insurance Number since then. The visa expired and he continued to work with no problems. In the course of time, he met a Romanian girl and had a child with her.
Recently he decided to try and legalise his status. I suggested a solicitor and he went about doing what the solicitor told him to do.
1 – Make sure his name is on the birth certificate for the child. Read More: http://movingtotheuk.co.uk/case-study-legalising-your-stay

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UK Visa Interview
Well, Natasha did not have an interview, but boy did we prepare for one. We did not know if she would have an interview or not, so we decided to prepare. The only way to prepare is to look on the internet and find other people’s experience. Usually the experience is somewhat similar. So after quite a bit of searching around, I understood the following:
1)    The interview does not last very long. Usually within half an hour you are done.
2)    Usually there is just one person interviewing you.
3)    You can have an interpreter if you wish, although if you can do it without one then, I think it might be better. But make sure you can understand the questions properly, otherwise it may prove counter-productive.
4)    The first questions are things like: What is your name?
Read More:

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Paperwork for the application

Ok, so we are going to be looking at the actual paperwork required for the application. This is the paperwork that Natasha took to the appointment with her. That is the appointment that we organised when we submitted the electronic Visa Application (read last post). We are going to list all the different parts as memory serves:
1 – First of all you will need to worry about convincing the visa officer about the veracity of your relationship. They want to see different kinds of consistent communication and time spent together. What we provided was too much really but we wanted to make sure. So here we go:
•    Skype conversations. We extracted all the Skype conversations and split them by month.
•    Google chats and hangouts. We chat a bit on Google too so we included that as well.
•    Love letters. We had quite a few of those so they went in as well.
•    Phone bills. We got original mobile phone bills and highlighted on them all the calls and text messages to each other.
•    Photographs. Write on the back or somewhere visible the date when it was taken and place. Make sure there are other people in the photographs like family as well, not just you two.... Read More at: http://movingtotheuk.co.uk/paperwork-for-the-application

The aim of this Communityis to walk you through the steps that we have been through (UK Spouse Visa, the paperwork, documents required, first steps of life in the UK, etc) in the hope that it may help other people. We hope that you will enjoy the read. For more details see www.movingtotheuk.co.uk
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