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Young, single New Yorkers favored to win affordable housing lotteries: City records show the bulk of lotteried apartments go to singles aged 25–34 If you’re young and you’re single, your chances of winning one of the hyper-competitive affordable housing lotteries run by the Department of Housing Preservation and Development go up—way up, reports DNAInfo. They combed through two years of public data to break down the bleak stats, finding that “the lion’s share” of these middle- to low-income apartments go to single folks between the ages of 25 and 34. In large part, that has to do with the available housing stock, DNAInfo explains. Between January 2013 and the end of 2015, HPD ran 48 housing lotteries for a total of 1,470 units throughout the city. But according to the data, more than half of those available units were either studios or one bedrooms. Here’s DNAInfo’s exact breakdown of open apartments in that time: * 293 studios * 605 1 bedrooms * 516 2 bedrooms * 56 3+ bedrooms Forty-one percent of those apartments went to residents between the ages of 25 and 34, while 50 percent of lottery winners were single. The stats for the older and the younger are less promising: only 4 percent of units went to people 62 or older, and 11 percent went to New Yorkers under 25. (This doesn’t take into account the lotteries run by the City’s Housing Development Corporation.) Sarah Desmond, the executive director of Housing Conservation Coordinators, which advocates for affordable housing on Manhattan’s west side, says the stock of particular types of units reflects the market. “We see a disproportionate number of studios and one bedrooms because that is the market for the luxury buildings in Hell's Kitchen," she told DNAInfo. Another potential factor: the accessibility of the lottery process itself. Potential renters often file their applications online through Housing Connect (though people can send in snail mail applications), leaving older people who might not be as internet-savvy at a disadvantage. If the applicant pool is disproportionately younger, Desmond said, it “speaks to a need for greater outreach.” While the city wouldn’t release the total number of lottery applicants, it is safe to say the number is high—DNAInfo recalls that time in 2015 when 200,000 people applied for an affordable housing lottery in Bushwick. The number of available units? 14. * City's Affordable Housing Lotteries Favor Young Single People, Stats Show [DNAInfo] #luxuryhomes #luxuryrealestate #realestate #pearlmalakou #aimiamos

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Affordable housing in New York: how to apply for affordable apartments: Everything you need to know about NYC’s affordable housing lottery Believe it or not, it was only five years ago that the city’s affordable housing application process went digital. The website, NYC Housing Connect, launched in 2012, and since then has made it easier—in theory—for New Yorkers to apply for affordable apartments in buildings across the five boroughs. Of course, while applying for an affordable apartment itself may be simple, actually getting an apartment isn’t exactly easy. As New York’s rental prices skyrocket and the demand for cheap housing grows ever-higher, more and more people are applying for the few affordable apartments available in qualifying new buildings. The first rental within the Domino Sugar redevelopment, for example, received 87,000 applications for just 104 apartments. That may have you feeling some despair about your chances of actually snagging one of these coveted apartments—and hey, we’re not going to pretend like one will magically fall into your lap. But still, it’s a pretty easy process: here’s everything you need to know about applying, what to expect, and more. Who handles New York City’s affordable housing? Developers are given incentives by the city and state, such as tax breaks, to create affordable apartments through programs like “Affordable New York” (the replacement for the former 421-a incentive program). Mayor de Blasio’s Mandatory Inclusionary Housing initiative, meanwhile, requires developers to create permanent affordable housing in new developments where a rezoning would be required to build bigger. Once the developer is getting ready to rent a building, they work with the Department of Housing Preservation and Development or the Housing Development Corporation to allocate the affordable units—often through affordable housing lotteries. What counts as “affordable,” anyway? This is where things get a little tricky. The monthly rent for an “affordable” apartment in New York City hinges on something called “area median income” (AMI), which the HPD explains as such: AMI is defined each year by U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) for all cities across the country. The 2017 AMI for the New York City region is $85,900 for three-person family (100% AMI). When developers are adding affordable housing in their new buildings, they set aside a number of apartments that are priced for those making a certain percentage of the AMI. Low-income housing, for example, may be allocated for households making up to 60 percent of the AMI, while middle-income may be priced for those making up to 100 percent of the AMI, and so on. To complicate matters further, apartments are allotted to households making a certain percentage of the AMI, rather than individuals, and the eligibility requirements change based on the number of people per household. HPD and HDC determine the minimum and maximum amounts that a household can make to be eligible for certain apartments, and those figures are typically outlined on each application. Oh, and this is all based on your pre-tax income, so things like tips and freelance work count. Like we said, it’s complicated—and the HPD’s income guide does a pretty good job of breaking it down. Okay, so how do I apply? This is the easiest part! Start by creating a profile on NYC Housing Connect: All you have to do is enter a few key details—your name, household income, employment status, and so forth. Your income is one of the most important parts of the application, since it determines your eligibility for apartments; the HPD has a handy guide to figuring out exactly how to calculate it. Once that’s completed, your information will be saved in the system, ready to be used any time you want to apply for housing. Listings appear on NYC Housing Connect pretty regularly, so the best way to ensure that you don’t miss one is to check the website on the regular. (Or check out our map of all the open affordable housing lotteries in the city.) Applications are typically kept open for a couple of months. HDC also maintains a list of city-subsidized rentals that are either open for applications, or that have waiting lists for apartments. While there’s some overlap with the Housing Connect listings, HDC breaks down the available units by the type of program each one falls under—ELLA, for example, is “Extremely-Low and Low-Income Affordability Program,” while LAMP is “Low-income Affordable Marketplace Program.” Yes, this is confusing, too—HDC breaks it down here. Is there any way to improve my chances? Members of local community boards often get preferential status for affordable apartments, so looking for housing in your neighborhood could help. Applicants with hearing, mobility, or vision impairments are also given preference, as are those who work for the city. In some cases, developers may set aside a number of units for other reasons—for example, Essex Crossing’s first affordable housing lottery allocated a number of apartments for former residents of the Seward Park Extension Urban Renewal Area. What happens after I apply? It’s basically a waiting game. According to HPD, it can take anywhere from two to ten months for applications to be processed and potential renters to be selected. If you’re one of the lucky few, you’ll be asked to come in for an interview—and you’ll to bring need a buttload of documentation, including a copy of your current lease, proof that you’ve paid your rent, birth certificates for everyone in your household, and your Social Security card. If you/your household passes muster, the next step is … more waiting. Here’s how HPD puts it: If your file is in order, you may be invited to sign a lease. You might also be placed on a waiting list. The developer will tell you if you if you’re on the waiting list. You are responsible for notifying the developer every six months if you wish to remain on the list So basically, even if you’re eligible, an apartment isn’t guaranteed—but if you do luck into one, you’ll find out once the developer and the city have given the thumbs-up. Once you’ve signed a lease, you’re good to go! What do the critics think? Lots of things! Critics say that this method of determining what’s “affordable” doesn’t necessarily create housing that’s truly affordable. What’s within reach for someone in an affluent neighborhood like the Upper West Side, for example, may not be in reach for someone in Crown Heights—but the AMI is the same across the city. Additionally, studies have shown that the current affordable housing lottery overwhelmingly favors young, single tenants—because developers aren’t creating enough apartments that are fit for families, or those with children—as well as white tenants. Oh, and then there’s the whole “poor door” controversy, which is the larger issue of developers separating the subsidized tenants from ones paying market-rate—some developers have built their affordable housing in separate buildings, or ask them to enter through separate entrances. So long story short, the way affordable housing is allocated currently is definitely not without its problems, and it’s a bit of a slog that may or may not pay off. But if you’re armed with information (and all of the paperwork you need) going into the process of applying, it’s worth a shot. * NYC Housing Connect [Official] * Where to find affordable housing in NYC [Curbed] #luxuryhomes #luxuryrealestate #realestate #pearlmalakou #aimiamos

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The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation announced that the project, the East Baltimore Historic II, is the winner of the prestigious 2017 HUD Secretary Award for historic preservation http://bit.ly/2vJiSHV . To know more about affordable housing, lihtc compliance visit our website at www.ahcspecialists.com or you can call us at 1-800-682-9394.
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Mayor's Office Announces Changes To City's Affordable Housing Lottery

 - Fort Greene Focus
fortgreenefocus.com
The de Blasio administration said today that it is working to ensure that “affordable housing” built by private developers “reaches the New Yorkers who need it most.”
Mayor de Blasio and Department of Housing Preservation and Development (HPD) Commissioner Vicki Been

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Affordable East Harlem apartments will get created under accelerated program: Just one percent of the city’s newly created affordable apartments over the last three years were in the neighborhood The De Blasio administration has made a fair bit of progress in its initiative to create more affordable housing throughout the city. Since 2014, there have been 20,854 affordable units that have been constructed or financed, part of De Blasio’s goal of creating a total of 200,000 new affordable homes by 2024. Despite all of this, the city’s Department of Housing and Preservation Development released a report showing that just 249 affordable apartments, or one percent, were created in East Harlem, even though more than half of neighborhood residents identify as being rent-burdened, reports DNAinfo. To address that gap, the city plans to expedite the creation of 2,400 new affordable housing units on public land over the next few years. To make this possible, HPD will “continue to seek out partnerships with non-profit and for-profit developers interested in developing affordable housing on privately owned land, but only where they commit to exceeding the minimum MIH requirements,” per the report. In addition, the 23-page plan details new workshops hosted by HPD that will educate tenants on their rights, along with more investment into the Tenant Harassment Prevention Task Force to assist those in rent-stabilized homes. It also calls for the city to explore opportunities to create more affordable artist housing, Mandatory Inclusionary Housing to be required by all new residential developments, provide training for local community members to assist others with the affordable housing application process, improving housing quality, and revamping the lottery site for an easier process. “The East Harlem Housing Plan charts a path forward for the future of housing and economic opportunity in East Harlem, guided by extensive community engagement, said HPD Commissioner Maria-Torres-Springer in a statement. * City to Fast-Track Creation of 2,400 Affordable Housing Units in E. Harlem [DNAinfo] #luxuryhomes #luxuryrealestate #realestate #pearlmalakou #aimiamos

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The NYC Department of Housing Preservation & Development (HPD) announced yesterday that it had secured $1.65 million in grants to help expand the city’s only community land trust (CLT) and support two new ones. Under a community land trust, a nonprofit typically takes ownership of government-held land, which gives them the power to ensure buildings on that land remain #affordablehousing to local residents for generations.

+amNewYork reports:

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The New York City Economic Development Corp. (NYCEDC) and the Department of Housing Preservation and Development are planning to transform the former Spofford Juvenile Detention Center in the Hunts Point section of the Bronx into a five-acre, mixed-use campus featuring affordable housing, commercial space and recreational space.

#realestate  | #news  | #multifamily  | #affordable  | #NewYorkCity  

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NYC Department of Housing Preservation and Development (HPD), Queens Borough President Melinda Katz, the Office of Attorney General Eric T. read more

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De Blasio revives Greenpoint Hospital's conversion into affordable housing: An RFEI to redevelop the site could be released any day now A long neglected Greenpoint site may finally get a new lease on life in the form of affordable housing. Mayor Bill de Blasio is following through on his promise to redevelop the Greenpoint Hospital complex into affordable housing, the New York Daily News reports. Any day now, the city’s Department of Housing Preservation and Development (HPD) will issue a request for expressions of interest (RFEI) to solicit ideas to redevelop the campus. The city is hoping for at least 300 apartments on the site, but according to the Daily News, it could be as many as 600 depending on how the massive site is redeveloped. The project to redevelop this hospital campus has been in the works for three decades. It was most recently revived by de Blasio in 2015. The city hosted a series of visioning sessions, and was set to issue a RFEI in 2016. It wasn’t until the end of 2016 that a representative for the HPD finally announced that an RFEI would come about in January 2017, but that date too came and went. This is in large part due to the fact that the hospital site is still partially occupied. One of three buildings that make up the campus is used as a homeless shelter, another is used as a laundry service center for other shelters, and a third is essentially derelict. A proposal to redevelop the site pushed forth by Mayor Michael Bloomberg fell apart after the developer was arrested on bribery charges. This time around, there might finally be some hope. The preliminary work of getting neighbors’ opinions and reaching out to local elected officials has been completed, and locals have long wanted this site to be converted into affordable housing. City Council member Antonio Reynoso told the Daily News that he was looking forward to a project, where for once, there would be no negotiation between affordable and market-rate housing. The city will consider proposals that preserve the buildings on the campus, which date back to 1912, but also those that seek to demolish the existing structures on the site, and build anew. They will however give preference to developers who take historic preservation into account, and have past experience working on such projects. In addition, the selected developer will also be required to create a new home for existing homeless shelter and clinic that are part of the overall 3.4-acre site. Now, we just have to wait to see when this RFEI will come out. * Mayor de Blasio revives push to convert former Greenpoint Hospital into affordable housing [NYDN] * Former Hospital Sits Vacant as Community Calls for Housing [Curbed] * Long-stalled Greenpoint Hospital building taken over by squatters, say neighbors [Curbed] #luxuryhomes #luxuryrealestate #realestate #pearlmalakou #aimiamos
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