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Ten Benefits of the Moringa Oleifera Tree

The Moringa Oliefera is one of many trees that we here at tentree are planting in countries around the world. It also happens to be one of the most useful trees around. Here’s a list of the top ten benefits of the Moringa Oleifera Tree!

1. In most cultures, the Moringa Oleifera is referred to as the miracle tree or the tree of life and the majority of it is edible and can be consumed by all ages. We’re off to a good start.

2. Moringa contains more that 90 nutrients, 46 antioxidants, and 36 anti-inflammatory compounds. It also has 18 amino acids, including the 8 essentials that our bodies need to survive but cannot manufacture ourselves (and must be supplied through diet). All this is 100% naturally occurring in the Moringa, whereas most multivitamins and calcium supplements available on the market are made using synthetic ingredients that the human body absorbs very minimal nutrients from.
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3. The flowers can be cooked down and are said to taste of mushrooms. The flower juice is useful for treating urinary problems and as a natural laxative. Tea made from the flowers has also been used as a common cold remedy.

4. The seeds can be eaten like peas or roasted like nuts but are often ground into powder and used in treatment of scurvy skin diseases, insect bites, arthritis, rheumatism, gout, cramps, STDs, and boils due to their antibiotic and anti-inflammatory properties. They have been used as a relaxant for epilepsy. And after oil has been extracted, the seed cake can be used as fertilizer or a flocculent to purify water.
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5. The oil extracted from the seeds can resist rancidity and is used to treat bladder and prostate problems, as well as stomach disorders. It can relieve headaches when rubbed on the temples and is also used in perfumes, skin care, and hair oil. It is also being studied for its potential as a biofuel.

6. The leaves are commonly known as the most nutritious part of the Moringa and have no proven side effects to this date. Gram for gram, these leaves have 7 times the Vitamin C of an orange, 4 times the Vitamin A of carrots and calcium of milk, 3 times the potassium of bananas, the Vitamin E of spinach, and the iron of almonds, and 2 times the protein of yogurt. Regularly consuming Moringa leaves has been linked to a boosted immune system, lower blood pressure, improved digestion and mood, and weight loss due to its high fiber and low fat and calorie levels. They’re also regularly used to treat fevers, bronchitis, anemia, and eye and ear infections.

7. The roots and bark are used to relieve lower back or kidney pain, for cardiac and circulatory problems, and as a condiment (much like horseradish), tonic, or tea for inflammation and digestion. (the roots and bark have all of the properties above but are more concentrated and should have more care taken when used as a medicine because the alkaloid spirachin (a nerve-paralyzer) has been found in the roots).
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8. Moringa has been used as a sexual virility drug to treat erectile dysfunction in men and increase sex drive (as an aphrodisiac) in women. It has also been known to prevent pregnancy; But in the case of having a baby, it will increase and nourish breast milk production.

9. In Jamaica, the sap is used for a blue dye and in Haiti the trees are grown as windbreaks and to help reduce soil erosion because it is fast growing (flowering begins within the first 6 months of planting) and drought resistant. It is also in full-leaf at the end of the dry season when most other foods are typically scarce.

10. Moringa has been advocated as a natural nutrition for the tropics and is being used to combat malnutrition (due to its high protein and fibre content) by major NGOs such as Trees for Life International, Educational Concerns for Hunger Organization, and Volunteer Partnerships for West Africa.

But beware that with the awareness increasing of the benefits of Moringa products, demand is skyrocketing and there’s already low quality product control happening. Be sure to read your labels and make sure the product you want has only 100% moringa oleifera and no fillers or additives, your capsules are vegan or vegetarian, and the manufacturer is reliable in where they source their product from. (A good way to tell is that your powder is a bright green and not brown.) Best of health to everyone from tentree!
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Moringa is a plant that is native to the sub-Himalayan areas of India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, and Afghanistan. It is also grown in the tropics. The leaves, bark, flowers, fruit, seeds, and root are used to make medicine.

Moringa is used for “tired blood” (anemia); arthritis and other joint pain (rheumatism); asthma; cancer; constipation; diabetes; diarrhea; epilepsy; stomach pain; stomach and intestinal ulcers; intestinal spasms; headache; heart problems; high blood pressure; kidney stones; fluid retention; thyroid disorders; and bacterial, fungal, viral, and parasitic infections.

Moringa is also used to reduce swelling, increase sex drive (as an aphrodisiac), prevent pregnancy, boost the immune system, and increase breast milk production. Some people use it as a nutritional supplement or tonic.

Moringa is sometimes applied directly to the skin as a germ-killer or drying agent (astringent). It is also used topically for treating pockets of infection (abscesses), athlete’s foot, dandruff, gum disease (gingivitis), snakebites, warts, and wounds.

Oil from moringa seeds is used in foods, perfume, and hair care products, and as a machine lubricant.

Moringa is an important food source in some parts of the world. Because it can be grown cheaply and easily, and the leaves retain lots of vitamins and minerals when dried, moringa is used in India and Africa in feeding programs to fight malnutrition. The immature green pods (drumsticks) are prepared similarly to green beans, while the seeds are removed from more mature pods and cooked like peas or roasted like nuts. The leaves are cooked and used like spinach, and they are also dried and powdered for use as a condiment.

The seed cake remaining after oil extraction is used as a fertilizer and also to purify well water and to remove salt from seawater.

How does it work?
Moringa contains proteins, vitamins, and minerals. As an antioxidant, it seems to help protect cells from damage.

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1. Moringa Oleifera is Very Nutritious

Moringa oleifera is a fairly large tree that is native to North India.

It goes by a variety of names, such as drumstick tree, horse radish tree, or ben oil tree.

Almost all parts of the Moringa oleifera tree can be eaten or used as ingredients in traditional herbal medicines.

The leaves and pods are commonly eaten in parts of India and Africa (1).

This is a photo of Moringa oleifera leaves, powder and capsules:

Moringa Leaves, Powder and Capsules

The leaves are an excellent source of many vitamins and minerals. One cup of fresh, chopped leaves (21 grams) contains the following (2):

Protein: 2 grams.
Vitamin B6: 19% of the RDA.
Vitamin C: 12% of the RDA.
Iron: 11% of the RDA.
Riboflavin (B2): 11% of the RDA.
Vitamin A (from beta-carotene): 9% of the RDA.
Magnesium: 8% of the RDA.
In Western countries, dried leaves are sold as dietary supplements, in either powder or capsule form.

Compared to the leaves, the pods are generally lower in vitamins and minerals. However, they are exceptionally rich in vitamin C. One cup of fresh, sliced pods (100 grams) contains 157% of your daily requirement for vitamin C.

The diets of people in developing nations sometimes lack vitamins, minerals and protein. In these countries, Moringa oleifera can be an important source of many essential nutrients.

However, there is one downside. Moringa leaves may also contain high levels of antinutrients, which can reduce the absorption of minerals and protein (3, 4).

Another thing to keep in mind is that if you’re taking Moringa oleifera as a supplement, taking it in capsules won’t supply large amounts of nutrients.

The amounts are negligible compared to what you are already getting if you eat a balanced, real food-based diet.

Bottom Line: Moringa leaves are rich in many important nutrients, including protein, vitamin B6, vitamin C, riboflavin and iron.

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All Essential Benefits/Effects/Facts & Information
Moringa oleifera is a tree that is sometimes called the Tree of Life or a Miracle Tree, but rather than this being in reference to its potential medicinal usage this is actually refering to how it is a very valuable food crop (it is drought resistant, grows very fast, and is highly nutritive) and even beyond food it serves many benefits in third world countries such as having an ability to be used for some crafts (due to being a tree) and cleaning water.

For usage as a supplement, moringa oleifera is recommended mostly as being a highly nutritious antioxidant. While it is indeed nutritious, supplemental dosages are too low to aquire adequate nutrition from and this claim is not relevant; it is a relatively potent antioxidant, and while it seems to be less potent than other herbs when tested outside of a living system it does appear to be quite potent when tested in living models. The reason for the increased potency in living models is not known (although it is possible that it can induce genetic transcription similar to Sulforaphane since the bioactives are similar in structure), but the antioxidant properties seem to underlie the vast majority of benefits associated with this supplement.

There are also antiinflammatory effects that, while less studies, seem to be quite effective; one of the bioactives, RBITC, is effective in suppressing macrophage activation in the nanomolar range which is worth some future research into. Beyond that, there does appear to be a nice anti-diabetic effect that has gone some very preliminary human testing which suggests that this plant may benefit pancreatic function and reduce blood glucose secondary to that.

While both the antioxidant and antiinflammatory properties are somewhat interesting, until the exact mechanisms and relative potency to some other antioxidants or antiinflammatories are tested it is hard to recommend this supplement over other options.

Now, despite the plant being referred to as 'nontoxic' this does not appear to be the case overall. While supplemental dosages listed below appear to be safe from all tested toxicity a relatively small increase (3-4 times the recommended does) is known to cause genotoxic damage and may promote cancer formation whereas doses higher than that cause overt organ damage (mostly liver and kidneys); this effect is seen with the seeds while toxicity of the leaves seems to be a lesser concern. Beyond that, very reasonable supplemental dosages appear to be able to induce abortions in pregnant rats and thus supplementation is contraindicted (not advised) in pregnant women.
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The Moringa Oleifera tree isthe most amazing tree in the world.
There are so many uses of this tree it's been dubed the miricle tree.
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