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mike lafferty

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over on the Super Villain Handbook discussion, one of the recent archetypes has been the Supremacist - pasting below.

SUPREMACIST

"I am not your enemy, X-Men. Nor do I consider you mine. True, my goal has ever been conquest of the Earth, but solely to create a world in which our race, Homo Superior, can live in peace. Look at yourselves, risking your lives for a humanity that would rather see you behind bars, or dead. Why do you persist?" ~ Magneto

The Supremacist is a villain with a racist agenda. 

EXAMPLES: Gorilla Grodd (DC); Magneto, Ultron (Marvel)

RELATED ARCHETYPES: Nazi, Ultimate Villain, Conqueror

POWERS AND ABILITIES: A Supremacist has to have powers that place him above ordinary men or else his beliefs become even harder to justify than they already are, and he becomes absurd. He is often more intelligent, stronger, and longer-lived than human beings, all of which he cites as evidence that his cause is logically correct. The idea that people should be treated equally regardless of their intelligence, strength, or lifespan is, of course, counter-intuitive to him. 

The Supremacist will share powers and other traits with his chosen people. So, for example, if he is a robot attempting to usher in the Machine Age, he will have Immunities that allow him to go without food, water, and sleep (but not electricity), and he will share these powers with his followers.

In fact, the Supremacist often has powers and abilities far beyond those of other villains, further evidence of his superior nature. See the Ultimate Villain archetype for advice on making and playing solo villains intended to challenge entire super-teams. 

OTHER QUALITIES: The Supremacist believes that his particular form of life – be it animals, robots, mutants, or something else – is innately superior to mankind. He is angry at humanity over the thoughtless and cruel way his people have been treated over the years, and he comes from an oppressed culture.

If he can afford them, the Supremacist is probably served by Faceless Minions, but some prefer to work in the shadows in order to escape the attention of authority. Others lead a small, select group of Servitors.

Although his avowed philosophy is one of equality among his own people, in fact the Supremacist considers himself the leader of his kind. All mutants may be created equal, but some are more equal than others. The Supremacist might talk a good game, but there's really one person who gets to be truly free in his new society, and that's him.

STORIES: Whatever form of life the Supremacist champions, it becomes a metaphor for race and ethnicity. The story of the Supremacist, therefore, is one about equal and fair treatment of our fellow man. It is a cautionary tale that reminds us of America's long struggle with racial inequality -- sometimes explicitly invoking the Civil Rights Movement, Martin Luther King, Jr., and Malcolm X, who are portrayed in caricature as a naive pacifist and a violent pragmatist, respectively. Supremacist stories also draw on the language and images of the Holocaust, the archetypal example of racial genocide in our history. Racist villains are instantly despicable, so writers and creators often make an antagonist into a Supremacist as a way of quickly and easily making it clear that, yes, this is the Bad Guy. The Supremacist is shorthand for "evil". Many are Nazis in all but name.

There are ways to make such a character more complicated and sympathetic, however. If the Supremacist comes from a group which has a history of being violently oppressed, his quest can feel more like an extreme overreaction than true evil. There is often irony here, as the Supremacist, in his revenge upon humanity, falls back on the same genocidal and repressive tactics that were employed against him. When confronted by this fact, a sympathetic Supremacist either recognizes his error and surrenders, or "doubles down" and commits himself to a future in which the ends justify the means. 

Heroes are far more likely to treat the Supremacist as a sympathetic adversary if they, themselves, are part of the group he champions. In other words, the Flash's conflict with Gorilla Grodd would be a lot different if the Flash himself were an ape. The evil the villain performs in his quest for racial dominance now taints the hero by extension, making the hero's job harder and forcing him to defend a humanity that considers him little better than the Supremacist he battles. You don't have to force your players to take a common origin for a story like this to work; simply being superhuman is a perfectly fair form of life for the Supremacist to represent. Many villains over the years have promised to create utopian societies ruled by super-people, and they have extended sincere offers to heroes who might join in this effort. "Super-people" can be a little fuzzy as a category, but it's often enough.

Along this line, sometimes the Supremacist develops a way to transform human beings -- either influential examples or en masse -- into his protected group. At its best, this story exposes the hypocrisy of discrimination and reminds us that people have much in common regardless of their skin color. The victims are transformed back wiser than they were before, and enemies become friends. At its worst, the victims are used as soldiers in the war against humanity, or simply die before they can be returned to normal, adding to the villain's death toll.

Usually the Supremacist's cause requires that man be exterminated to make room for the villain and his chosen people, but if humanity is lucky, they might be allowed to survive as menial labor or second-class citizens in a Supremacist state. These goals establish two very different plots; in the first, the Supremacist is a Conqueror who intends to create a utopian -- though tyrannical -- state out of our admittedly flawed human society. Global blackmail via a technological threat (earthquake machine, weather control satellite, etc.) is a common tactic in this type of story. In the second, more genocidal, version, the Supremacist is still a Conqueror, but world conquest is a means, not an end. He really desires nothing less than the mass extinction of all humanity. Ruling the world just means the trains in this second Holocaust will all run on time.

Finally, the Supremacist can be presented as laughable and absurd, rather than evil or even as a sympathetic victim. These Supremacists wage war based on a "logic" so ridiculous that it highlights the absurd nature of racist arguments. See, for example, Frank Gorshin's memorable turn in the Star Trek episode "Let That Be Your Last Battlefield." For a Supremacist of this type, potent super human abilities, minions, and so on are not required. He exists not to threaten the heroes with violence, but to expose the foolishness of discrimination. This is satire, and so can even be funny in a dark and bitter sort of way. 
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Tom Tyson's profile photoWalt Robillard's profile photo
 
This will almost be a blueprint for supervillains... you could be facilitating a world takeover through this very book!
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Set up a page on my blog where I'm posting my ICONS creations, just because.
So...ICONS character creation is pretty fun. I like playing around with it quite a bit, and though I lost all of the old ICONS characters I created, I started playing around with the new Assembled Edition and Great Power. I'm...
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To celebrate the new edition of ICONS - Fainting Goat Games is having a ICONS IS BACK sale. Almost all of our ICONS products are now 25% off. Check it out...
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Rob Barrett

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Any chance down the road of getting a bookmarked PDF? No rush, just thought I'd ask. Overall, the revision looks great.
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Walt Robillard's profile photomike lafferty's profile photo
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I would love to see some digital bookmarks as well.  They just make navigation on the laptop and tablets so much easier than going back to the table of contents and then launching forward to the page.  Plus I hate writing down the important page numbers on Sticky notes and putting them on my tablet.  Kinda retrotechaphobic.
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mike lafferty

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Rob Barrett's profile photo
 
D'oh! Beat me to it!
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We're having an open discussion about supervillain archetypes over on facebook. Please join in. We've looking for all the constructive feedback and input we can get. 
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Steven Trustrum

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Steven Trustrum's profile photoWayne Peacock's profile photo
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Actually, great success.

Social media conversions are up, as are sales rooted in the pop up.
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One wonders sometimes how "mentally ill guy who thinks he's an old southern poker player" can really pose a meaningful threat to "dude who has a power ring that lets him do anything he wants".

http://therpgpundit.blogspot.com/2014/06/golden-age-campaign-update.html
So in this weekend's ICONS game, set in August '44, we had the Nazi super-speedster Zyklon break out of prison and wreak havoc all over the eastern seaboard to try to slow the supply lines for the allied invasion of Europe. A...
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About this community

This is a community for anyone wanting to play, discuss, write for, illustrate, or otherwise be involved in ICONS RPG style play.

Asako Soh

Discussion  - 
 
Asako Soh originally shared:
 
[SPEAKING TO THE KAMI] ICONS The Assembled Edition - Character Creation

  As a young roleplayer in the 80′s, super hero RPGs featured heavily in my gaming.  The main games back then were the wonderful Golden Heroes and TSR’s Marvel Superhero Roleplaying Game (‘FASERIP’). Since I returned to the hobby 7 or so years ago, I…
  As a young roleplayer in the 80's, super hero RPGs featured heavily in my gaming.  The main games back then were the wonderful Golden Heroes and TSR's Marvel Superhero Roleplaying Game ('FAS...
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Max Traver

Discussion  - 
 
Does anyone have any advice about how to make a "stink spray" attack in ICONS?  
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Max Traver's profile photoTore Nielsen's profile photo
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Thanks!
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the currently archetype we're discussing over the Supervillain Handbook Facebook group is the Twisted Genius. 
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David Semmes

Discussion  - 
 
Diving into ICONS Assembled and I was wondering- does test difficulty use a sliding scale, determined by each hero's own ability, or is it acceptable to use static difficulties or target numbers?
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David Semmes's profile photoSteve Kenson's profile photo
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Thanks!
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Just got through reading the ICONS Assembled Edition PDF.

I already emailed Steve, Dan (and graphic designer Daniel Solis), but I wanted to repeat it here:

They did an AWESOME job on this book.   It's a brilliant new edition of the game, and they should all be very, very proud.

Well done, guys!
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It makes me want to start rolling up characters again.

And also play a Universe-style game (loved those rules in Team-Up).
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Icons Assembled has a release date of "Summer" as far as I can tell. I assume that means "by Gencon..."

+Steve Kenson ?

I ask for totally selfish reasons. I am hoping to run Icons in July, and would love to have the new ruleset.
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Wayne Peacock's profile photomike lafferty's profile photo
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Wow. Thanks! 
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Wayne Peacock

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mike lafferty

Discussion  - 
 
interesting post speculating on a home-rule for initiative
http://forum.rpg.net/showthread.php?729191-ICONS-Initiative-roll
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mike lafferty

Discussion  - 
 
ICONS Assembled preview link from Green Ronin
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Jon Tate's profile photo
 
Can't wait!
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mike lafferty

Discussion  - 
 
user named SpookyVoodooLove over on RPG.net was looking for some feedpack on an ICONS character. Give it a look
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