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“Letting go means to come to the realization that some people are a part of your history, but not a part of your destiny.” ~ Steve Maraboli
michelle margaret originally shared:
 
I’ve been let go. You’ve been let go.
We’ve all been let go.
Here are some ideas on how to "get over it" and move on with life.
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Please read and share this interview with the wonderful La Sarmiento, Buddhism's first (to my knowledge) openly gender non-conforming teacher. 
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michelle margaret

>>Environment & Economics  - 
 
 
Support sustainable farming and community education projects, rather than the corrupt military and police force in Guatemala.
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michelle margaret originally shared:
 
I mean, why does life have to be sad for some people and not for others?
Why is it that some of the poorest people live happy and rich people don’t even know what happiness is?
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Those who awaken never rest in one place.
Like swans, they rise and leave the lake.
On the air they rise and fly an invisible course.
Their food is knowledge.
They live on emptiness.
They have seen how to break free.
Who can follow them?
- Buddha in the Dhammapada - courtesy of dailyzen.com

One of the toughest situations for my clients is the experience of knowing what to do to change but just not doing it. It is one of the more insidious conclusions for anyone who is unhappy and wanting to change. It is a self imposed judgement of incompetence complicated by the mystery of why. " I don't know why I don't do what I need to do". They are stuck because they believe there are factors outside of their control that prevent them from changing. My job is to help them see how they are like swans; that they already have the capacity to rise and fly. By slowing things down and devoting time to being still they can experience a natural hunger for knowledge. To never rest in one place is to live each moment with an open mind and an open heart. Conclusions dissolve into possibilities and the awareness of our Buddha nature becomes a guide for the invisible course of our life.
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Wonderful article, thank you.
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This interview features Anam Thubten offering radically honest answers about attachment to views (particularly views about the Buddhist teachings) and how it leads humanity away from peace and reco...
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Mike Garcia

>>Discussion  - 
 
Empty your mind, be formless, shapeless like water
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There is more to emptying of the mind in Buddhism than just buying a homeless person a meal. 😁 
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Buddha in Suburbia
Buddha in Suburbia documentary, directed and written by Robert Wilkins, tracks the extraordinary journey of 40 year old Lelung Rinpoche, one of Tibetan Buddhism's three principal reincarnations, as he
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About this community

This is a grassroots community to explore and expand Socially Engaged Buddhism and to share experiences that we can all learn from. It was started by Joan Halifax and Upaya Zen Center and is an open forum. Please review Community Guidelines before posting and check out Resources & Google+ Tips for help with Google+.
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Lisa Dale Miller presents on the theory and practical application of Buddhist psychology. Hope to see many of you there.
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Anshu Henri

>>Discussion  - 
 
 
Ce Dimanche Jiun Eric Rommeluère et Joshu Jocelyn Mayaud nous parlaient de notre regard sur les personnes en situation de handicap à l'émission Sagesses bouddhistes.
 ·  Translate
Quel autre regard porter sur les personnes handicapées ? Quelle place le bouddhisme peut-il offrir ?...
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Whatever people do, whether they remain in the world as artisans, merchants, or officers of the government, let them put their whole heart into the task; let them be diligent and energetic.
And if, like the lotus flower, which grows out of muddy water but remains untouched by the mud, they engage in life without cherishing envy or hatred; if they live in the world not a life of self but a life of truth, then surely joy, peace, and bliss will dwell in their minds.
- Buddhacarita courtesy of dailyzen.com

Commitment to treatment is an important factor for successful experiences in psychotherapy. Resistance in treatment can be viewed as a problem brought into the session by the client and can sabotage the therapists ability to facilitate change. Over the years I have come to realize this is a very narrow view of a dynamic and intersubjective experience. As Roshi Joan Halifax has said; enlightenment happens in the context of a loving relationship. In therapy there are two people joined in a common cause. Commitment and resistance are the competing forces that facilitate change. The therapist and the client engage in dialog that can shift from being diligent and energetic to being avoidant and confrontational.
We are all lotus flowers and although we are untouched by the mud we cannot exist without it. We will never be able to put our whole hearts into every task all the time. Just as our mind will wander in meditation; our tendencies to cherish envy and hatred will find their way into our minds and hearts. It is the recognition of this that allows us to return to the in breath; renew our commitment to our compassion;and cultivate loving kindness. When I can pause with my client to process a difficult session we are resuming our endeavor to live life whole heartedly.
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Joan Halifax
owner

>>Discussion  - 
 
Buddhist Chaplaincy an important path to social change. 
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Very good news about Thay's health....
 
A lovely update on #thichnhathanh 's health. He's making progress and even leading a bit of meditation.
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So glad to hear this
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Meditators down through the ages have known that repeated practice of attending to an object improves capacity to aim and maintain focused attention on an object. Seeing the third-person evidence is useful, but hardly enlightening...
A new brain-scanning technique could change the way scientists think about human focus.
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A wonderful article on Tulku Urgyen Rinpoche
http://www.tricycle.com/dharma-talk/clouds-vanish
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Thank you so much for this posting!
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Especially for school teachers... But these ideas apply to all who practice mindfulness and heartfulness.
michelle margaret originally shared:
 
As any teacher knows, the emphasis on standardized testing and conventional curriculum is only keeping us running in the race to nowhere. Instead of waiting for laws to change and the nature of assessment to evolve, we can begin the process of teaching mindfulness today. By modeling, practicing, discussing and persisting at mindfulness, we become more calm, clear, inspired and insightful thinkers and learners.

At the beginning of my first year of teaching, I hung a sign on the wall of my bilingual third-grade classroom that said, “En este salón, todos son maestros y todos son estudiantes.” In this room, ...
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A wonderful book for Buddhists, yes, but also one that can reach across religions... Great for people of all faiths, or none.
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michelle margaret originally shared:
 
“Do not let a day go by without taking some time for yourself — some time you spend in pure pleasure, as you see it.” ~ Napoleon Hill, Grow Rich—with Peace of Mind

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