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Your assignment this week is to create a lesson to share with the TechXMooc Community that focuses specifically on reasoning and argument and that supports the Common Core Standards you have just reviewed.   Be sure to read and comment on posts by your fellow students for great ideas and inspiration.
Title: Biography project 
Summary: Students will research a person important to culture/society and report on that person - focusing on their importance to history
Subjects: Social Studies, LA, technology
Technology hardware & software: Internet access, MS word for timeline.
Standards: 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.W.1 Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.W.2 Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.W.4 Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.W.5 Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.W.6 Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing and to interact and collaborate with others.


Objective: 
Lesson: Using the internet, students are given time to research a specific topic.  This specific lesson is to use a Google timeline template to put important events in order based on a biography.
(I do) I demonstrate how to use the notes or book I’ve read to find information to fill in the timeline template. The timeline of the person's life (must include at least 8 events on the timeline and 4 pictures) 
(they do) Using the their research and a Google template, students will fill in their timeline as part of a bigger project on their biography
Student can: 1. Attend to internet research on a specific topic
2. Type information into a Google template
3. Copy & paste images into a Google template


Extension:  This is a part of a large project.  The complete project would look something like this:
Select a biography book from the library.
Finish reading the book within a week.
Fill in a graphic organizer about the person:  Early life, Young Adult, Adult, Accomplishments/Awards, Mottos/quotes they are known for
Make a timeline of the person's life (Must include at least 8 events on the timeline and 4 pictures)
Write a biography report rough draft in writer's workshop journal
Edit/Revise with a partner
Type Final biography report on the computer.
Find a picture of your person (internet) and draw a self portrait of your person to make the cover
back cover of the report- find some pictures from the internet and type up some quotes that your person is known for. 
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2013-12-09
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Your assignment this week is to create a lesson to share with the TechXMooc Community that focuses specifically on having students present information and that supports the Common Core Standards you have just reviewed.   Be sure to read and comment on posts by your fellow students for great ideas and inspiration.
Title: Symbaloo to present a topic
Summary: Students will use Symbaloo to create a web page of pins on a topic.
Subjects: Variety
Technology hardware & software: Internet access - Symbaloo has an app and can be used with tablets as well
Standards: 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.SL.4 Present information, findings, and supporting evidence such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the organization, development, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.SL.5 Make strategic use of digital media and visual displays of data to express information and enhance understanding of presentations.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.SL.6 Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and communicative tasks, demonstrating command of formal English when indicated or appropriate.
Objective: Students will be able to  search the internet for relevant information to share an a specific topic. Students will create a Symbaloo to hold their information. Students will share their Symbaloo with other students and across grade level as other students use their Symbaloo for research.
Lesson: Using the internet, students are given time to research a specific topic.  As they research, they use Symbaloo to “pin” their websites and research to share later with other students and to teach their topic to other classes or grade levels. Requirements: 2 videos, 3 websites, 4 images.  Games, apps, blogs  etc. extra.
(I do) I demonstrate how I’ve gone out to the internet and collected sites about states and capitals.  I have 2 videos, 3 websites for practice, and 4 images- in this case maps.  I’ve also included sites for fun games to play.  So students how to search Google (internet) for sites on your topic - model internal talk about what would be good to share with other and what won’t work, then model how to add to a Symbaloo.
(we do) Create a Symbaloo together - remember to ask about steps & expectations along the way - ie, what do I push to save this in my Symbaloo?  How many videos did I need?
(they do) Using the internet - research a topic and pin sites that fit the requirements to Symbaloo.
With continued use this lesson becomes more and more independent & productive.  I’d have upper grade students create Symbaloos for lower grades to use in the computer lab to do research on a topic.
Student can: 1. Attend to internet research on a specific topic
2. Save websites & videos using Symbaloo
3. Share Symbaloo with the class: learning and choices


Extension:  Students can share across grade levels, locations, etc.  I would consider videotaping students explanation and saving that to their Symbaloo as well.  Students choose Symbaloos to share with other groups of students.  This could be broken up in to groups or independent (that would be a lot of Symbaloos). I love the idea of sharing with The California Student Media Festival.

Your assignment this week is to create a lesson to share with the TechXMooc Community that focuses specifically on attending to precision and listening and that supports the Common Core Standards you have just reviewed.   Be sure to read and comment on posts by your fellow students for great ideas and inspiration.
Title: Listen & Attend to presentation/video
Summary: Students will use Edmodo assignment to respond to video clips & share with the class their thinking
Subjects: Variety
Technology hardware & software: availability to watch video whole group, or students can be assigned the video and work through Edmodo assignments.  Edmodo (Google sites/apps can work similarly)
Standards: 
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.L.6 Acquire and use accurately a range of general academic and domain-specific words and phrases sufficient for reading, writing, speaking, and listening at the college and career readiness level; demonstrate independence in gathering vocabulary knowledge when encountering an unknown term important to comprehension or expression.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.SL.6 Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and communicative tasks, demonstrating command of formal English when indicated or appropriate.
Objective: Students watch a video from YouTube or SchoolTube (Possibilities are endless.  We’ve done commercials, cartoons, music videos and of course content.), then can either respond to the presentation orally through “turn and talk” or with practice, using Edmodo assignments.
Lesson: Using a video selected by the teacher, introduce the video and prepare students by informing them that they will be watching a video that they will need to pay close attention because they will be sharing their thinking about the video and they may even need to answer questions about what they’ve learned.
(I do) watch beginning of the video share thinking as a model - allow students to ask questions with the expectation of your correct response.
(we do) watch more - have students share thinking in questions with partners
(they do) respond using Edmodo or written/oral response to thinking and questions
With continued use this lesson becomes more and more independent & productive.  For younger students we draw pictures instead of sentences.
Student can: 1. Attend to a video
2. Comprehend and share thinking in community chat with other students

Extension:  This simplistic technology lesson can become more independent and used with many other literacy projects.  I often start this type of lesson with oral practice before using Edmodo assignments.  We do a lot of “turn & talk” in the classroom with guided questioning. 

Title: Evaluating Arguments 
Standards:
W9-10.1 Write arguments to supports claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
W.9-10.9 Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.
W.9-10.6 Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish and update individual or shared writing products, taking advantage of technology’s capacity to link information and to display information flexibly and dynamically.
SL.9-10.5 Make strategic use of digital media (e.g. textual, graphical, audio, visual, and interactive elements) in presentations to enhance understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence to add interest.
CCRA.R.7 Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse media and formats, including visually and quantitatively, as well as in words.

CCRA.R.9 Analyze how two or more texts address similar themes or topics in order to build knowledge or to compare the approaches the authors take.

Materials:
Ipads or computers with Diggo

Teacher notes:
Direct students to navigate to two articles on two different sides of an issue. 
Have students use Diggo to evaluate the arguments and specific claims in the articles.  They should put sticky notes next to each different argument paragraph and then highlight the claims in pink highlighter, and the evidence in yellow highlighter.
Have a class discussion about each article with students summarizing the key ideas and giving details from their highlighted articles in relation to the evidence that was used in each of  the arguments.
Have students choose one side of the argument that they agree with and write a paragraph with their claim and 2 supporting pieces of evidence. Have them write a second paragraph with the counterclaim and their refutation. 

Title: Attending to the text and following patterns throughout a literature piece 
Standards:
• CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.L.3 Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts, to make effective choices for meaning or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading or listening.
• CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.L.5 Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.
• CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.SL.1 Prepare for and participate effectively in a range of conversations and collaborations with diverse partners, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
• CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.SL.3 Evaluate a speaker’s point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric.
• CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.SL.5 Make strategic use of digital media and visual displays of data to express information and enhance understanding of presentations.

Materials:
Class literature book
Books on CD, tape, ipads, mp3 players, etc.
Computers
Evernote
ThingLink

Teacher notes:
Present the role of folders(notes) within Evernote to students. Each type of textual evidence goes in a different folder (or note). Explain to students that they are using these folders to gather textual evidence, draw conclusions and trace patterns or themes in the text. (The folders (notes) can and should be for different types of figurative language also. Ex. Metaphors used throughout a text).

Students listen to a chapter using headphones and follow along in their book. As they are reading they use post-it notes to mark sections of the book that have important textual evidence related to one of the themes of the book or figurative language devices. On the post-it they write the theme/pattern at the top, the textual evidence, and then their conclusion as to why it is important.

After they are done reading, they take the information on the post it notes and organize it into the proper Evernote folders to organize their thinking.

At a late stage in the book or at the end, have students annotate a class ThingLink page for each theme by placing links to their different Evernote folders related to each theme on ThingLink. (I have not tried this so I am unsure if you can link to a folder in Evernote but you can link to notes. So maybe it should be a folder with the book's name and then individual notes for each theme).

Write a detailed account of a historical event
Standards:
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.W.3 Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details and well-structured event sequences.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.W.4 Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.W.5 Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.W.8 Gather relevant information from multiple print and digital sources, assess the credibility and accuracy of each source, and integrate the information while avoiding plagiarism.

Materials:
Computers
Pinterest accounts
Copy of MLK, JR speech / video of MLK speech
First person account of the event

Teacher notes:
Read about a historical event as a class (such as MLKs speech at the Mall). Go over the vocabulary and key points. Discuss the article.
Read a first person account from someone who was there. Highlight or underline the details in the first person account that help the reader develop a mental picture of the event. Watch video of the speech.
Have students use Pinterest to research and pin historical photos of the event. 
Have students write an “action snapshot” of the event using vivid details and enough detail that someone could draw a picture of the event. The details need to be descriptions based on their pinned boards. It needs to include information about when the event took place, where the event took place, who was there, what happened at the event, and why it was important.
Have students read their written piece to the class and use their pinned boards to explain their details and what pictures they felt were the most important to help develop a detailed account of the event.

Title: Presenting a Narrative Writing Story 
Standards:
• CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.L.3 Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts, to make effective choices for meaning or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading or listening.
• CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.SL.3 Evaluate a speaker’s point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric.
• CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.SL.5 Make strategic use of digital media and visual displays of data to express information and enhance understanding of presentations.

Materials:
Ipads with Toontastic
Mentor text Narrative Writing piece
Narrative writing graphic organizer

Teacher notes:
Distribute copies of the mentor text and read the piece with the class. Have students use highlighters to color-code the chunks of text:
Pink- speech
Green- action
Yellow –Narrator thoughts
Discuss how the piece would be different if any one of the three colors were left out.
Have students use the narrative writing graphic organizer to organize the different sections of their narrative writing piece about an event in their life where they learned something important.
Have students write a narrative piece about an event in their life where they learned something important. Have students color-code their piece in the same way as the mentor text. Is one color missing? Have students think about what they can add so that their colors are as balanced as the mentor text.
Have students use Toontastic to put together their story. Have each student present their Toontastic animated story to the class.

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Title: Effective evidence in argument writing
Standards:
W9-10.1 Write arguments to supports claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
W.9-10.9 Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.
W.9-10.6 Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish and update individual or shared writing products, taking advantage of technology’s capacity to link information and to display information flexibly and dynamically.
SL.9-10.5 Make strategic use of digital media (e.g. textual, graphical, audio, visual, and interactive elements) in presentations to enhance understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence to add interest.
CCRA.R.7 Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse media and formats, including visually and quantitatively, as well as in words.
CCRA.R.9 Analyze how two or more texts address similar themes or topics in order to build knowledge or to compare the approaches the authors take.

Materials:
Evidence Gathering Graphic Organizers
Computers
Packets of articles about anti-bullying programs in schools
Picktochart

Teacher notes:
As a class go over the Evidence Gathering Graphic Organizer and examples of the different types of evidence it is asking for.

Students will use the Internet to research the issue of anti-bullying programs in school and if they seem to be making a difference.

While doing their research they will use the Evidence Gathering Graphic Organizer to organize their evidence for the two sides of the issue (anti-bullying programs are needed in schools to stop bullying/ school anti-bullying programs are not effective at ending bullying). This graphic organizer asks them to write down 5 different types of evidence (personal experience, reasons, confirmed facts, statistics and research by experts.) The students will fill out one graphic organizer for each side of the issue.

Using their graphic organizer students will write a paragraph listing 3 claims and with 3 supporting pieces of evidence for each side of the issue. (2 paragraphs total)

Next students will use Picktochart to create a poster listing 3 claims, each with a piece of supporting evidence, for both sides of the issue (are anti-bullying programs needed in schools to stop bullying). So 6 claims and 6 pieces of evidence in total.

Finally students will do a peer review using a rubric for the argument paragraphs and for the posters. They will evaluate the content presented in both pieces to determine which parts of each enhance the arguments and also those that make the most convincing argument.
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The major emphasis in our high school ELA classes has been literary analysis and narrative writing. The CCS now emphasizes reading both literature and informational texts, as well, as narrative, informational, and argument writing. Our state did have communication standards but not in as much detail as the new CCS ones. It seems like the CCS is more explicit in its focus on detailed academic type conversations and responses from students. Also, our evaluation rubric for years has said, "uses technology to support student learning" but it's never been clear what that looks like or should look like. And considering the technology and amount of resources we have in our classes  to use with students this is still a struggle to meet. I'm a bit apprehensive about trying to fit in so many different types of instruction with struggling learners during the school year. It seems like a lot of material to cover.

Module 6 Assignment
Your assignment this week is to create a lesson to share with the TechXMooc Community that focuses specifically on reasoning and argument and that supports the Common Core Standards you have just reviewed.   
Objective:  Students will use reason and argument to convince other students about who really discovered America. Students will collect research using Memonic
Background: This lesson is a possible extension of my Module 5 assignment or could be used as a more complex alternative. As part of grade 5 social studies students are required to study explorers in the Age of Exploration. In the past we have used the Interact simulation “Who Really Discovered America?” which is part of their Great American Confrontations series. This lesson will be an introduction to that and replaces and updates the research. 
http://www.teachinteract.com/c/product.html?nocache@2+s@EkF_nDND6aEic+record@TF28982
This lesson plan is based on the ideas in the Interact project.
Students will start this work knowing about Columbus Day and various aspects of the Columbus exchange. Students will also have read Jane Yolen’s book Encounter and be aware of both positive and negative views of his impact. 

Some CCSS that I will be addressing are:
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.5.1 Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 5 topics and texts, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.5.1a Come to discussions prepared, having read or studied required material; explicitly draw on that preparation and other information known about the topic to explore ideas under discussion.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.5.1b Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions and carry out assigned roles.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.5.1c Pose and respond to specific questions by making comments that contribute to the discussion and elaborate on the remarks of others.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.5.1d Review the key ideas expressed and draw conclusions in light of information and knowledge gained from the discussions.
English Language Arts Standards » College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Writing » 5
Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach.
Integration of Knowledge and Ideas
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.R.7 Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse media and formats, including visually and quantitatively, as well as in words.1
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.R.8 Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, including the validity of the reasoning as well as the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence.
Key Ideas and Details
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.5.1 Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.
Integration of Knowledge and Ideas
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.5.7 Draw on information from multiple print or digital sources, demonstrating the ability to locate an answer to a question quickly or to solve a problem efficiently.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.5.8 Explain how an author uses reasons and evidence to support particular points in a text, identifying which reasons and evidence support which point(s).
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.5.9 Integrate information from several texts on the same topic in order to write or speak about the subject knowledgeably.



Grade level: I have based this around Grade 5 Standards though it could be easily adapted to 4-6 or beyond. 
Materials:  , I-pad, tablet or computer. Internet access, email accounts
Activities:
Introduction
1. Explain to students that it might be important to think about whether Columbus was really the first person to discover the Americas. He’s I a national icon who has a day of his own each October. Do they know that there are other explorers who also came here, and some historians think that maybe Columbus wasn’t the first. What are their opinions?
2. Remind them that whatever their opinions may be, they must have accurate data to support their ideas. Today will learn to use a tool that will help them with that.
3. Explain that the students task will be to find out more about some of these other claims, then take on the role of one of them and convince the class that they are, indeed, worthy of the title of True Discoverer of America. 
“You will be role playing one of these explorers to another class. Your job will be to convince them that you are the one who should be known as the Discoverer of America. You will need to be convincing and you will need to provide evidence, facts and a bibliography of your resources. You will probably need to answer questions from your audience and you can’t just make it up! You will need to write a script to show you are prepared and will have something to refer to.” 
They will need to provide a written or visual document (tba after discussion) to support their thinking with a bibliography.
4. Explain that students will be using a new tool to help them store and organize their research called Memonic.

Activities
5. Show students how to drag and drop mnemonics into tool bar at top of page from website
6. Show how to create their own account using their own school email address. Show  clip content,   read later, book mark, write a note, and gathering mode work within the tool.
7. Show how each has a question mark/help section to explore if students need help and can’t solve with help (trying to encourage their independent exploration) http://help.memonic.com/display/EN/Memonic+help+section+-+Get+started%21
(This may require future differentiated lessons using http://help.memonic.com/display/EN/Take+notes+and+capture+web+content )
8. Explain that for this lesson only we will try bookmarking and clipping content, so they become familiar with that part of the tool first. Students feeling confident, or more tech savvy can feel free to try out all other aspects in addition. 

Independent/group work
9. Students- working in pairs or alone will try the drag and drop and set up accounts as in # 4 and 5 above.
10. Students will book mark and use clip content after researching the following contenders for who really discovered America: Brendan the Bold, Hoe Shin, Christopher Columbus, Leif  Ericsson , Prince Madoc of Wales, Bjarni Herjulfsson, Native Americans, and any other possibilities they may find as part of this search. Share my dash board to demonstrate… http://www.memonic.com/dashboard
11. Show how their information may be organized into folders under each explorer.
Closing
12. Regroup and students discuss findings. What worked, was a challenge, how it may be useful etc.? Does Memonic help?
13. Reiterate importance of research and how they must have accurate data to support their ideas and opinions. “As you will be role playing one of these other explorers to another class
14. Set goals for next lesson- selection of specific explorer, pair or individual work, handout of project outline with expectations detailed.
Extensions and Other thoughts:
As with previous lessons, this is a fairly  simple introductory session for the students to explore Memonic. As they become more familiar they will discover and share more of its uses. My goal would be by the end of  a few research projects, it will be automatic to use it to store, save and organize. 
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