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After working through the example Desmos Activity Builder activity within the module, what are your thoughts on how DAB could be useful/implemented within the classroom? How might you use it?
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Having read through Dan Meyer's three blog posts on Three ACT Math lesson facilitation, take a moment to reflect on your takeaways. Specifically, what structures are key to Three ACT Math task facilitation that were initially less evident to you in earlier parts of the module? How do these structures support the mathematics learning?
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Are you planning to attend this year's National Council of Teachers of Mathematics Annual Meeting & Exposition in San Antonio, TX from April 5th-8th?

Let us know so that we can plan a meet-up! Based on the interest we receive we will plan a school visit or happy hour, etc. If you live in a nearby regions and are interesting in attending but cost is an issue, let us know that too. We may be able to help!

Please send questions to Jennifer.Rodriguez@teachforamerica.org if you are local to San Antonio, or to jordan.evangelista@teachforamerica.org if you live anywhere else.

One of my questions regarding rigor or rather developing rigorous content is being at an alternative [not in the traditional sense] school, various grade levels in one class, with individuals being at various levels of understanding and proficiency...how to develop content the meets everyone's need while preparing for a state exam?

Rigor, At a Glance

What will students produce...math task...?

As I think about one student in particular, she would have a paper with numbers written on it having found the total and determined the mean. She would then determine how far the desired mean is from the actual. I see her finding what the total must be based on desired mean and the total possible numbers. I see her rearranging numbers ti insure the set-up is correct to arrive at the correct median. What I see would be many steps involving manipulation to arrive at the desired result. [Left side]

This same student would use the calculator to plug in numbers to arrive at her mean...visually transforms numbers to find the median... and would do the same to find the mode and range. [Right side]

What type of student thinking is required....understanding?

The right side requires a linear thought process...not much thinking outside the box.

The left side would demonstrate a more creative or holistic approach.

What type of questions do you need to ask....student thinking you just considered?

Clarifying questions of terminology...Is it important to know the mean and median of the original set?...If so, why?...Clarifying questions on where they are headed with the question...What approaches mathematically seem plausible?...What are your "must knows"?

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In my school setting, the one thing that stands out as being most impactful on student learning is affirmation. Students want to know they are headed in the right direction. Affirmation does not have to be only acknowledging they have gotten an answer correct but affirming they are going in the right direction.

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Knowing What Your Students Know (Sept 2016 PD Module) Reflection

Take a moment to consider and jot down the different placements for formative assessments within a lesson and their accompanying purposes. How might formative assessments at these different placements look similar or different? How do the actions taken from the resultant data seem similar or different? Reply to this post with your reflections!
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Great PD Opportunity tomorrow night. The Global Math Department is hosting the "Mathematics of Game Shows". This should be really interesting for those of us who teach statistics either as part of a course or as a stand-alone.

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Last week's Global Math Department meeting was about relating different mathematical representations to each other. Incorporating this type of relational thinking is very important for us to do as math educators. If you'd like to view the recording, just follow the link.
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