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I always believed that it's hypocritical to sit at the table of the world, asking for equality, but unable or willing to give a seat to another. It's true we are all unique people, like any minority group; with different educational backgrounds, interest, religious and political views. As Trans people, we all transition differently and for different reasons. As this new year begins, we realize the work has just begun. Yet, in 2016, we witnessed more visibility of Trans people than ever before and in every aspect of life. There is more visibility of Trans masculinity than ever, but not all Trans men. Trans men of color remain the most unheard part of our community, and not by a lack of trying. There's few stories about Trans men of color, and when there is, their stories are often scrolled pass, un-shared, or simply ignored. I feel the visibility of all Trans people is vital to our inclusion in society. Our diversity is key to showing the world we exist, and are everywhere.
It's time we put Trans men of color (African American, Latino, and Asian), front and center this year, in order to continue the show of diversity in Trans society. That's why every month this year, Transmuseplanet, will feature a Trans man of color that is active and inspiring in our community as our monthly role models. Our brothers of color have a seat here; will you give them one too?

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One thing that has fascinated me about Bernie Sanders is his openness to court what he, and a few in media are now calling the trans vote, and in that, is power in the future for trans society. While it is true our community is as diverse as any, and therefore there are fragments of supporters for other candidates naturally as well, but I have never witness such a large group within our community, unite, be represented and acknowledged by a Presidential Candidate like we have seen thus far with Sanders.
For that reason, among all others, I endorse, and encourage the continued, uniting support from our community for Presidential Candidate Senator Bernie Sanders.

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Sadly the news only gets worse, not only for our sisters and brothers in South Dakota, but for all transgender people. If S.D., lawmakers didn't think HB 1008 wasn't enough, they have leashed a second attack on transgender kids. Today the state's House State Affairs Committee voted 8 to 4 to advance yet another attack on vulnerable trans youth in the form of HB 1209, which is different from the HB 1008,  1209 focuses in on birth certificates in a veiled attempt to block transgender kids from participating in sports programs, and other activities in a manner that's consistent with their gender identity. The bill would have a broad array of unintended consequences for all South Dakotan's, and transgender people everywhere, because it would require any public body to accept as valid all information on a person's birth certificate, even if that information is outdated and incorrect. This bill, if it would become law would also set a precedent for several other states that have similar bills in legislation to be passed.


Representatives of that state have also passed HB 1107, a bill that would explicitly authorize recipients of taxpayer funds or other state recognition to discriminate against same-sex couples, transgender people, and single mothers. It is a disguised as an attempt to protect religious beliefs, a move growing among Republican controlled states.
We urge all our friends, trans allies, brothers and sisters to join us, and make this call. Genocide starts with discrimination, and segregation before murder. Let's not take that chance...act now!
#transgender   #trans   #wejustneedtopee  

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For those who are not familiar with anyone outside of their race, I'd like to share a few of my fellow sister's and brother's of color that are making a difference for the entire trans community, even in the face of trans-on-trans racial discrimination. Here are a few of those that have, and continue to inspire me everyday to do what ever I can for my trans community. We should celebrate all trans people, and for more than just one month out of the year.

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This year's list, we have formulated a list of nominees from the countless post, tweets, and comments by our readers here and on the various social media pages. As well, as on TMPlanet.net, our new online social network for our friends of TMP. Now it's your time to cast the vote and help us this year make the final top 20 list.Cast up five votes for those you feel best represented these qualities, or has inspired you.
Cast your vote for five of the most Influential Trans People of 2015

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This past week my heart was broken. I watched as an elderly trans advocate of the Charleston South Carolina area, who had been evicted from her apartment, be forced to leave a hotel and to find another place to lay her head. Her first name is Olivia and without her, there would more than likely not be any support system with in the trans community in this area. Back in 2000, she formed the local trans support group. There they have guided many to find appropriate therapist and doctors to carry out one's transition. The group now has a local support system of nearly 50 transgender individuals, that attend various meetings, and connection to even more who have been in the past. Due to health, the group's directors have changed over the years, but all members, have always and continue to acknowledge it's founder, Olivia.

One of the reasons she no longer headed the organization was due to a diagnosis of Parkinson's disease. Last year she underwent deep brain stimulation surgery, to counteract tremors that are associated with Parkinson disease. She has no children and few family support, a place in life that many of us will face if we live to call ourselves elderly. Along with medical expenses, she has found herself near the edge of homelessness. Still transgender, but now elderly, frail, unable to make a living even if she wanted to, and no family.

When I ran into her at the hotel, I was surprised to see her and ask what was she there for. She told me her story, my heart broke. Not in just a sympathetic way, but out of fear. I am one of those trans women, who have never had children, approaching the dreaded 40, and may live to see my parents and older siblings pass away. My fear came from the idea that this one day could be me. What if I found myself, old, frail, and alone in the world. My first thoughts came to you my TMP readers and trans family. I had to ask myself, honestly, would my community be there for me? It breaks my heart but the truth is I don't know, and I seriously doubt it.



I look at representation of my community in social media, on television and in news, and all I see is the struggle for young people to be who they are. Once we are living our authentic selves, the only other representation is of the beauty and vigor of today's trans society. Does anyone in our community care about what it even means to be trans and elderly? I fear for all in my community as we grow older. I hope we can move beyond the "look at how beautiful" or "how passable" images we want to throw at mainstream society. I hope we can see that there are many of us, disabled, mentally ill, elderly, that are also transgender and need our support.

What can we do for those like Olivia. I admit, I'm not rich and struggle to pay my way now in life but I hope that this letter to my community urges many to help. Between this blog and it's social network pages, there is at least traffic of 150,000 people. I have started up a go fund me page for Olivia and I'm asking that my community show, that yes, we will still be there for our brothers and sisters when they are no longer young and beautiful.
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