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GaitTrack app makes cellphone a medical monitor for heart and lung patients.
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New Stanford blood test identifies heart-transplant rejection earlier than biopsy can.
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Strokefinder' helmet makes rapid stroke #diagnoses.
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Viviana Gelletti's profile photoAteronon's profile photoarseye pezeshky's profile photo
 
What a great invention! This device could help so many people out there.
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 #Bacteria implicated in  #stress-related  #heart attacks.
Stress hormones break up bacterial biofilms, potentially dispersing plaque deposits into the bloodstream.
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 #Wearable  #blood monitor could predict  #heart attacks.
Heart attacks could in future be predicted days in advance using a wearable blood monitor.
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Cardio God

Discussion  - 
 
 
Who knows, what is a Myocarditis? Any ideas are welcome.
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SERENA PICERNI's profile photoCardio God's profile photo
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+SERENA PICERNI Thank you! I can totally agree that sometimes it is not enough to give the reply in few words. Thanks God we are progressing! Best wishes from CardioGod
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Asthma or Something Else? That Is the Question
#consultantlive #respiratorydiseases 

A 44-year-old African American woman was evaluated for symptoms of worsening cough, shortness of breath, chest tightness, and fatigue of 6 months’ duration. Bronchial asthma had been diagnosed 2 years earlier, and she had been compliant with her inhalation therapy (budesonide and formoterol). Her exercise tolerance had become reduced over the past 6 months.

The woman denied smoking, alcohol intake, and illicit drug abuse. She did not have any fever, weight loss, night sweats, or joint pain. She denied any allergies. Six months earlier, she had noticed the appearance of a progressive purple rash around both eyes. The rash responded poorly to topical hydrocortisone.

http://www.consultantlive.com/respiratory-diseases/asthma-or-something-else-question?cid=G+
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Subtle ST-Segment Elevation in Inferior Leads: Is This an Infarction?
#consultantlive 

A 57-year-old woman with a history of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and angina presented to the emergency department with chest pain. She noted the onset of the pain approximately 2 hours before arrival at the ED; the pain was associated with dyspnea, emesis, and diaphoresis.

On examination, she was alert and oriented and in significant distress; significant diaphoresis was noted. Vital signs were: blood pressure, 105/64 mm Hg; pulse, approximately 70 beats/min; respiratory rate, 24 breaths/min; temperature of 37.4°C (99°F); and oxygen saturation, 92% on room air. The examination was otherwise normal.

Which ECG diagnostic tool or finding is most appropriate to confirm the diagnosis of STEMI in this patient?

A. Serial ECG analysis
B. Additional ECG leads
C. ST segment trend monitoring
D. Reciprocal change - See more at: 

http://www.consultantlive.com/cardiovascular-diseases/subtle-st-segment-elevation-inferior-leads-infarction?cid=G+
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6 Things Your Male Patients Need to Know Now
#consultantlive #menshealth #menshealthmonth 

The rate of undiagnosed diabetes mellitus is high among men in the US. One reason may be because many men aren't comfortable talking about health issues.

http://www.consultantlive.com/mens-health/6-things-your-male-patients-need-know-now?cid=G+
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About this community

The official community of the American Heart Association. Join us for discussions about heart and brain health, heart disease and stroke. Participation Guidelines: Thank you for becoming a member of your American Heart Association | American Stroke Association's Google+ community. We encourage you to post comments, photos and videos on this page and in our community. The American Heart Association | American Stroke Association Google+ community is intended to provide a forum for discussion, and the content provided by those other than the AHA/ASA does not represent the opinions or positions of the AHA/ASA. Likes, comments and shares by the AHA/ASA are not endorsements. To keep with our family-friendly culture, we will review community posts and remove any that are offensive or inappropriate. We will leave your posts as they relate to subjects on this page. The American Heart Association | American Stroke’s Google+ community is not intended to provide medical advice or treatment. Only your healthcare provider can provide that. The AHA/ASA recommends that you consult your healthcare provider regarding your personal health matters. If you think you are having a heart attack, stroke or another emergency, please call 911 immediately. American Heart Association | American Stroke Association Terms of Use All users must comply with the Website’s Terms of Use and the American Heart Association's Participation Guidelines. The AHA/ASA does not monitor every post by a community member on the AHA/ASA's Google+ page and community. However, content will be removed if it falls into the following categories: • Abusive, harassing, stalking, threatening or attacking others • Defamatory, offensive, obscene, vulgar or depicting violence • Hateful in language targeting race/ethnicity, religion, gender, nationality or political beliefs • Fraudulent, deceptive, misleading or unlawful • Trolling or deliberate disruption of discussion • Violations of any intellectual property rights • Spamming in nature • Uploading files that contain viruses or programs that could damage the operation of other people’s computers • Commercial solicitation or solicitation of donations • Link baiting (embedding a link in your post to draw traffic to your own site)

Cardio God

Discussion  - 
 
Who knows, what medications should be available in the medkit of a cardiovascular patient?
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SERENA PICERNI's profile photoCardio God's profile photo
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I prefer if you add new sites, corrections...in order to improve our preparation.  A comment is nice, but we are here to learn. I would like to know the pricise answer, an MD must be pricise. Thank you. 
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Mayo  #Research Shows  #Cardiac  #Rehab Patients Who Use Smartphone App Recover Better.
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Could   #light be used to treat   #atrial   #fibrillation painlessly?
 Dr. Brian says that the electric shock method is very painful. As an alternative, the researchers came up with a method that uses optogenetics.
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Viviana Gelletti's profile photoAteronon's profile photo
 
Fascinating research! It would be great not to have to rely on the more painful electric shock method in future.
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New  #MRI Analysis  #Predicts Which  #Stroke Patients Will Be Helped — or Seriously Harmed — by Clot-Busting Treatment.
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This is an amazing story wonderfully written. H/t +Yonatan Zunger
 
All Your Base Are Belong to Us*

Cutie with Long Q-T: A baby girl is born with an irregular heartbeat. Out of synchrony, her heart stops beating several times. By Day 2 doctors perform emergency surgery to implant a cardiac defibrillator. They cut off the sympathetic nerves to prevent further stimulation of this condition.  She is put on a slew of medications but it's too soon to know if they are the right ones for her condition. Her diagnosis? Long Q-T syndrome.

Choreographing a Ballet: Every heart beat is powered by a wave of electrical activity caused by carefully choreographed opening and closing of ion channels that move sodium, potassium and calcium ions into and out of cardiac cells on a millisecond time scale. This electrical activity is picked up in an ECG which parses out the events as a repeating waveform labeled P, Q, R, S, and T (image). Each waveform triggers the cardiac muscles to contract rhythmically, pushing blood out of the chambers of the heart. In long Q-T syndrome, the lengthening of the Q-T interval reflects a delay in resetting the lower heart chambers ("repolarizing") so that the arrival of a new heart beat occurs before the conclusion of the last one. This can set off a confusion of waveforms which appear to twist around a point, resembling the ballet movement torsades des pointes (see http://goo.gl/ctSg2d) to trigger fainting, seizures or sudden cardiac death. 

Choosing a Channelopathy: Long Q-T syndrome occurs in 1 of every 2,000 persons. About 2/3 of the cases are due to mutations in two potassium channel genes which cause them to fail to open. Another 10% of mutations are found in sodium channels which make them fail to close. Either way, the Q-T interval is prolonged. But potassium and sodium channels have very different responses to drugs. Before treatment, it's important to know where the defect lies. With our baby girl, her condition was too serious to play around with different drugs. So the scientists at Stanford University took the unprecedented step of sending her DNA for whole genome sequencing. It took 13 years for the first human genome to be fully sequenced. This baby girl's DNA was sequenced before she was 10 days old. A mutation was found in the KCNH2 gene encoding a potassium channel known to be defective in long Q-T. She was taken off sodium channel blockers, put on more appropriate medication, and sent home. As one of the scientist's remarked, "This is the future of genetic testing and we hope, the future of medicine."

What's normal anyway?: It is somewhat stunning to note that sequencing revealed 3,711,590 single nucleotide variants and 754,196 insertions and deletions that would cause more than 900 protein variants in our baby girl! Some of these could potentially cause other disorders, possibly in the future. We may all have our genomes fully sequenced in the not too distant future and we must ponder what we would do with this information?

REF: Molecular Diagnosis of Long-QT syndrome at 10 Days of Life by Rapid Whole Genome Sequencing (2014) Priest et al.  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24973560

News story: http://goo.gl/PZDPc6

*Know your meme: AYBABTU

#ScienceSunday  
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Cardio God

Discussion  - 
 
 
What is the classic radiographic examination of the chest used for? Any ideas?
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SERENA PICERNI's profile photoCardio God's profile photo
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I'm glad to be helpful. 
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Tobacco companies have made cigarettes deadlier than ever

http://workouttrends.com/third-hand-smoking

Tobacco companies have introduced flavorings to make the taste of cigarettes more appealing, while also introducing chemicals that reduce discomfort and irritation in the lungs. Higher levels of #nicotine, ammonia, and sugars have increased the addictiveness of cigarettes over time.

Not Only you are harming yourself, but your family & friends as well, as they suffer from third hand #smoking  #health   #cancerawareness    #workouttrends  
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Jane Bass's profile photoSharon Cloud's profile photoSamyuktha Venkateshan's profile photo
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GOD BLESS YOU, AND "HAPPY 4TH"


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Electrify your heart by adding these 17 power foods into your diet. ➨ http://bit.ly/1qyc5Jq
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Hispanic Youth Face Risk Of Increased Rate Of Weight Gain During Summer Vacation - http://bit.ly/1i0XG89
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