Post has attachment
Here is the link to my Story Table and Final Media Project: Mike's Journey.  This is posted on my e-Portfolio at:
 http://mfelix53.blogspot.com/ .

Post has attachment
I became interested in this when my wife dvr'd several episodes for our 2-year old grand daughter. It's interesting to me that story is captured in expressions and motion, without the use of words (of course I realize I may be dating myself, since this is essentially was what Gumby was all about, too!). Nevertheless, this Italian-made animation series has both a narrative arc that runs through all the episodes, as well as an episodic narrative arc.

How would you describe the different purposes of each of the artifacts you will produce in the planning stages of story development (story map, script, story table)?
 
The story map ensures that the essential elements are in place to have a compelling story, and further, that all the elements of the story are making a direct contribution to the point of the story, the emotional appeal. This is one clear way to see that there are no extraneous “rabbit trails”.  It’s also a way to convey the story elements to a colleague, a producer, or a writer, so that the story in the mind of the storyteller can be told in some medium.
 
The script is the voice-over, or the dialog, that takes place in the story. It’s the narrative that leads the listener, or the reader, through the emotional connections of the story arc. Emotions can be triggered by words, music, or pictures, but the narrative becomes the ”rails” on which they ride.
 
Lastly, the story table (as a replacement for a story board) connects the story and the narrative to the nuances of production. The story table informs the producer (who could incidentally, be the same person as the story creator) on the media elements, the timing, the transitions, and the flow, in order to achieve the emotion and impact intended by the story core.
 
How does the story core represent the essential foundation of story and the story experience?
 
The story map is the “flesh” on the “bones” of the story core. I prefer to think about a compelling story core first; that is, what challenge, obstacle, or dilemma calls for an interesting or intriguing change or transformation? If the transformation involves a character who transformed from wearing jeans and a tee-shirt to work, to wearing suits and ties, I’m probably not compelled to read or listen to the story. On the other hand, if the transformation is about someone who was battling addictions and then went on to become one of the most revered blues guitarists of all time, I’ll hang on every page. It’s the difference between getting an “A-Ticket” ride at Disneyland and an “E-Ticket” ride (I realize I’m dating myself here). The very ticket promises some measure of thrill and excitement, without even taking the ride, yet.  

Post has attachment
Marcel the shell with shoes on: we are who we are, and that is a wonderful thing.

Post has attachment
1. How would you describe the different purposes of each of the artifacts you will produce in the planning stages of story development (story map, script, story table)?

The steps of story planning and development are: 1) get idea, 2) create story core, 3) create story map, 4) write the narrative, story, and/or script, 5) and create storyboard, if warranted.

STORY MAP

A story map evolves naturally from the story core by providing new information about the plot and more in-depth consideration of the story core elements: problem, transformation, and resolution.  It is a diagram displaying the basic emotional flow and overarching action of the story.  The purpose of a story map is to ensure the sequence of events supports a story that is compelling and memorable.

SCRIPT

A script is a document that outlines aural, behavioral, and lingual element required to tell a story.  “If it ain't on the page, then it ain't on the stage.”  

STORY TABLE

A story table is simply a Word table consisting of two columns.  In the left hand column appears your script.  In the right hand column appears your thoughts about the kinds of images and other media you might want the audience to see or hear as they are listening to your voice-over narration.  This is an opportunity to think through how you want to match your words and your images.

2. How does the story core represent the essential foundation of story and the story experience?

The story core represent the essential foundation of story as it upholds the struggle between resisting change and pushing to change.  With this resisting-pushing dynamic, there is forward momentum and internal rhythm.  In responding to the challenge, the main character pushes itself past the tipping point in order to transform, resolve the story, and reestablish the balance that existed before the challenge.

The story experience is the transformation of the central character to become a different person (i.e., stronger, smarter, wiser, more mature) at the end of the journey.  Stories with internal transformation occurs when we see our own transformation in the changes of the character.  The character reminds of us where we have been or what we need to do in order to resolve something in our own lives - making us think of our own story.  
Photo

1.     How would you describe the different purposes of each of the artifacts you will produce in the planning stages of story development (story map, script, story table)?

A story map is reflects the plot points in the story core elements in a deeper, more sophisticated way. It includes the plotting of the emotional elements and maps out the plot in a way that makes sense; specifically, the problem, transformation, and resolution. A story map is using a visual tool that helps the creator see the story arch and any potentially missing elements.

A story map is turned into a script, or the written narrative of the story. The script creates the dialogue for the narrator or the conversation between characters that unveil the story core. When the script takes the story core and turns it into a compelling narrative, the audience will to want to hear the message until the end. The script is the the foundation for the story table.  

The story table consists of a table with two columns. On one side of the table is the script, and on the other side is a description of the images or media that should be taking visually place during that spot in the script. Using a story map and story table can help the writer or producer save money when planning for a production.


2. How does the story core work?

The story core is the basic story of transformation that happens due to the challenges and opportunities in the characters of the story. It is a challenging problem that compels a person to grow, digress, or transform as a result of that challenge. The purpose of the story core is that it provides a way to structure and identify the story in media. This applies to all forms of business, advertisements, documentaries and more. The story core is the narrative that causes the audience to want to hear the message until the end. It puts audience members in state of anticipation and engagement as they watch the story’s characters transform.

1. How would you describe the different purposes of each of the artifacts you will produce in the planning stages of story development (story map, script, story table)?

Story maps are a visual aid to compose and organize the components of a story’s core. The core is nucleus of everything as Matt mentioned; a springboard for the map, script and table. Rather than looking at the map as a ‘this happens then that happens’ like an episodic outline, it more so develops pace and rhythm not for just the writer, but also for the benefit of readers and the entire production team to stay on track. I see maps as a far-reaching, character driven chart, guiding the reader into the natural direction of the story’s core, complete with conflict/resolution, ups/downs, ordinary world/call to adventure, and transformation.

Scripts are the formatted story that brings everything together; the characters and emotion linked to the setting and journey. As opposed to a shooting script (more detailed on camera action and scene numbers), screenplays or spec scripts are what I have the most experience with in reading and writing.  Action and dialogue fuel the script. Right off the bat within the first few pages, the reader should be hooked and emotionally invested into the story. For that reason, I think scripts are extremely important because if a reader does not get a sense of the story core’s elements (suspension, conflict, hero, etc.), then it is very unlikely that it’ll see the greenlight of day to be produced. 

Story tables are essential in linking the dialogue and action from the script to the actual visual element viewers are going to see. I think the table is very very necessary because it forces the writer to make sure that every line in the script is absolutely necessary. If it’s not adding anything emotionally or visually, then it doesn’t need to be there. 

2. How does the story core represent the essential foundation of story and the story experience?

The combination of map/script/table is a clean and concise way to watch your core story grow. Getting the core story narrowed into a clean “what is this project about?” answer is beyond necessary from both a branding and narrative perspective. Personally, I find that I get to the core story after I complete a bunch of exercises like story maps, a matrix, and brainstorming tips from Julia Cameron’s awesome resource “The Artist’s Way.” I find it easy to get side tracked and want to fit every character I come up with in one script. But more often than not, they’re unnecessary because they relevant to the hero or the core. The core is the journey, full of transformation through action. And the story experience as a whole has to be consistent with this core.  

1.     How would you describe the different purposes of each of the artifacts you will produce in the planning stages of story development (story map, script, story table)?

The varied artifacts that are used in the planning stages serve useful purposes. The story map directs you through the tone and feel of the story. A story map can help you organize the way you want the story to feel. In fact, the story map can bring the visceral aspects of the story to light prior to the details the script provides. The script is the detailed application of the message determined in the map. The story map informs the script. I would use the academic research paper as an analogy. The story map is the outline; the script is the actual paper. The story table organizes the output of the story. When I say output, I mean the script and any visuals (pictures, slides, electronic images) that are used to convey the feeling of the story.

2. How does the story core represent the essential foundation of story and the story experience?
 
Every lead character in a story must be changed from the beginning of the story to the end. This is the story core, the problem that is being conquered or the difference that is being made in the lives of the major characters. Because of this, the reader can be affected by the story. The intended message can then resonate to the reader. These elements symbolize the fundamental efforts of storytelling.

1. How would you describe the different purposes of each of the artifacts you will produce in the planning stages of story development (story map, script, story table)?

I believe you have to start with Story Core.  This is the first artifact in story development.  The Story Core is the essence of what you want a story to be, when you tell it.  It is simply the question you want your audience to ask when you introduce the story, the struggle or opportunity to for change [transportation], and finally the resolution.  I kind of think of the Story Core like standing at an intersection, and having street signs that tell you where you came from, where you are (decision point) and where you can go.  Now you have to build the story, and decide if you turn back, go forward, or find an alternate path.  
Next we have a story map, which I think is apropos, considering my example of an intersection.  The story map, is just that, a map, which will help you further define the path you want a story to take.  It allows you an opportunity to do additional plot development and highlight major plot points.  This doesn’t have to be detailed, but it is like setting direction on your cars GPS and adding a few way-points along the way.  This helps to flesh out the ups and downs of character development.  Keeping in mind, a story map aims to highlight the emotionally engaging milestones, which reinforce ‘suspension of disbelief’ and help transport the viewer.  And a map is usually an actual drawing of the story arc or VPS.  
We all know that a script is the dialogue of a story.  It’s the written form of what we plan to portray through moving images, assuming our story is video based.  Scripts I suppose are formal / formatted story exposition, intertwined with stage direction and what I would call “off camera” action.  Scripting is a chance to flesh out the connective tissue that leads the character on its journey between the emotional points from your story map.  It begs the audience to ask, “what happens next?” and it is the storyteller’s opportunity to build suspense, introduce other characters, introduce conflict, and ultimately provide resolution, while maximizing the flow [transportation].
Finally we have Story Tables.  Story Tables, work like storyboards, but almost in reverse fashion.  They ply words with descriptions of visuals and pair it with dialogue from the script.  This is contrary to a storyboard that focuses on visual drawings to frame a scene.  The difference is important.  As Dr. Ohler points out, story tables provide media alignment and make sure the visuals match the dialogue, and it is a superior planning tool.  In most cases, as individuals creating media stories, we don’t have luxury of a script supervisor, or producer, director, continuity manager, etc.  We are all of those.  Story Tables help us in this sense, so we can focus on story and media production, and then staying organized in the end.

2. How does the story core represent the essential foundation of story and the story experience?

I sort of already touched on this, but to reiterate, I believe story core is fundamentally 3 elements that define the overall story in a succinct manner. Brevity is paramount for story core because we are only focused, to use a corporatized term, 30,000 foot view.  Story Core, is then, is a definition of the stories central challenge.  Second, defining character transformation – what takes the hero from version 1.0 to version 2.0.  This is most often in the middle of the story – so you have rising action and story development, the transformation, followed by, our third element, response and resolution.  The third part of the story core is where we return our hero to balance, and provide closure to the situation.  

How would you describe the different purposes of each of the artifacts you will produce in the planning stages of story development (story map, script, story table)?
The story map conveys conceptually how the information can hook the audience into paying attention; from a steady state or all is well situation, to a disruption by an event or a challenge (that presents a learning opportunity), to the various strategies that the protagonists tries, to being transformed, to ultimately succeeding in returning order to their world.

The script is the voiceover, I imagine it as the text that accompanies the visuals in a picture book. Its purpose is to lay the foundation for planning and organizing the visual aspects of the media for your production.

The story table creates a detailed blueprint for the see/say aspects of the production. The story table creates a document for the stakeholders (student & teacher or writer & director) to discuss the production before committing and investing resources into it.

How does the story core represent the essential foundation of story and the story experience?
The elements of a stories core are a central character who has a problem and undergoes a transformation in order to solve it (Ohler).

This represents the essential foundation of the story experience,  rather than conveying data via a list, story conveys information in a way that stimulates the minds ability to remember and find relevance in the information. Somehow our evolutionary brain selected for story as the most efficient way to supplement instinct with additional cultural information and improve the survival of our species. 
Wait while more posts are being loaded