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Sophie Zhang

Animal Welfare  - 
 
Please sign. Thank you!

BRAND NEW PETITION.....FOR LAKSHMI THE TEMPLE ELEPHANT......PLEASE SIGN AND SHARE THIS PETITION THANK YOU.....

http://www.thepetitionsite.com/180/330/995/demand-immediate-release-of-lakshmi-the-temple-elephant-to-a-sanctuary/?taf_id=27570471&cid=fb_na#bbfb=838862255
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Sharon Wardle

Animal Welfare  - 
 

PLEASE SHARE & DONATE IF YOU CAN!

Help make it happen for #TykeThePlay

Sharing Tyke's story is important because wild animals are still mistreated all over the world, and in the UK, it's still legal to use wild animals in circuses.
A new play imagining the events leading up to an abused circus elephant’s tragic break for freedom | Crowdfunding is a democratic way to support the fundraising needs of your community. Make a contribution today!
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DM101 L

Animal Welfare  - 
 
 
Conservationists are calling on the US to raise the protection level for leopards, severely curbing hunters’ ability to import body parts as trophies.

Conservationists have demanded a crackdown on the import to the US of leopards killed by American hunters, in an attempt to replicate the protections introduced in the wake of the furore caused by the death of famed lion Cecil.

A coalition of animal welfare groups have petitioned the US Fish & Wildlife Service (FWS) to classify all leopards as endangered, the Guardian can reveal. This would severely curtail the ability of American hunters to bring home “trophies”, such as leopard skulls, paws or skins, from hunting trips to Africa.

America is a leading collector of leopard parts. According to a Humane Society analysis of data from the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species, US trophy hunters imported parts of 5,575 leopards between 2005 and 2014.

It is unclear how many leopards remain across Africa and Asia but the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) has warned the species has “declined substantially” due to habitat loss, paucity of prey and targeted poaching for sham medicinal products in south-east Asia and China that can generate $3,000 for a leopard carcass.
The IUCN states that “poorly managed trophy hunting adds to pressure on local leopard populations”. In 2016, South Africa stopped the hunting of leopards, over concerns that untold damage was being wrought.

Currently, the FWS classifies leopards in northern Africa as endangered and sub-Saharan animals south of Gabon and Kenya as threatened. This distinction, drawn up in 1982 following lobbying by hunters, means that much less scrutiny is placed upon leopard imports from the southern half of Africa.

Buoyed by the success in getting lions classed as endangered last year following the controversial demise of Cecil, a famous Zimbabwean lion who was shot by a dentist from Minnesota, conservation groups want the FWS to extend endangered species protection to all leopards.

>>>>More: https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2016/jul/25/leopards-animal-welfare-groups-endangered-us?CMP=share_btn_gp
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DM101 L

Animal Welfare  - 
 
 
A mysterious green foam that looks like it was taken straight out of Ghost Busters, emerged from a street vent in an Utah town.

Residents in Bluffdale, Utah, about 20 miles south of Salt Lake City, were terrified to find a foam-like green substance coming out of a street vent from a sewer on Thursday.

City officials were concerned the blob was related to an algae bloom in Utah Lake. But test results show the two are separate issues. The green foam is a product of a nearby canal's moss treatment
A mysterious green foam that looks like it was taken straight out of Ghost Busters, emerged from a street vent in an Utah town.Residents in Bluffdale, Utah, about 20 miles south of Salt Lake City, were terrified to find a foam-like green substance coming out of a street vent from a sewer on Thursday...
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DM101 L

Animal Welfare  - 
 
 
Driven by dwindling polar ice, climate change is actually changing the way the Earth spins, new research shows. Melting ice sheets are contributing to the change in polar motion, a term scientists use to describe the “periodic wobble and drift of the poles."Climate change is actually changing the wa...
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DM101 L

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Coupled with threats such as habitat destruction and climate change in Alaska’s Arctic, high levels of mercury discovered recently in shorebirds could create further challenges for the species.
Coupled with threats such as habitat destruction and climate change in Alaska's Arctic, high levels of mercury discovered recently in shorebirds could create further challenges for the species. In a study published in The Condor: Ornithological Applications, lead author and TWS member Marie ...
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DM101 L

Animal Welfare  - 
 
Please sign.
 
Please sign.
In 1986, the International Whaling Committee (IWC) implemented a ban on whaling worldwide. Due to this moratorium, frequency of whaling dropped and whale populations increased. However, Iceland, Japan, and Norway still engage in illegal whaling activities ; this is often under the ruse of "scientific...
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Sophie Zhang

Animal Welfare  - 
 
Kaavan, a 32-year-old Asian elephant who has spent his whole life in a ramshackle enclosure at the Murghazar Zoo in Islamabad, Pakistan, is finally going to a sanctuary.

The global quest to free Kaavan started in the summer of 2015, when Samar Khan happened to be visiting her family in Pakistan from the U.S. last summer. After Khan learned that the elephant in the Islamabad zoo had been chained for 28 years, she started a petition to free Kaavan that caught the world's attention.

Read more: https://www.thedodo.com/pakistan-senate-kaavan-sanctuary-1943236411.html?utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=share
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+Rory Tipping Thank you so much my dear friend!
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How Our Appetite For Fish Is Eating Us Into Extinction

If the ocean dies, we all die. Why?

A few people have asked me to explain just why it is that humanity will die if the ocean dies.

Billions of people depend upon the ocean for food, and I’m not talking about restaurants, sushi bars and fish markets in New York, Paris, London, Tokyo or Sydney. I’m talking about extremely poor people whose lives actually depend upon catching fish.

But food being taken from the ocean is the least of the factors that will kill us.

The ocean is the life support system for the planet, providing 50 percent of the oxygen we breathe and regulating climate. The ocean is also the pump that allows us to have fresh water. It is the driving force, along with the sun, of the global circulation system that transports water from the land to the sea to the atmosphere and back to the land again.

Plankton – the most important group of plants and animal species on the planet (excluding bacteria). Plankton populations have been diminished by 40 percent since 1950, yet there is now commercial exploitation by Norwegian and Japanese fishing corporations to extract millions of tons of plankton for conversion to a protein-rich animal feed.... http://www.onegreenplanet.org/environment/how-our-appetite-for-fish-is-eating-us-into-extinction/
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About this community

People interested in helping ALL Animals worldwide.

Sophie Zhang

Animal Welfare  - 
 
Government agencies funded by public money are spreading toxins on a broad landscape basis by air. One such toxin 1080 (sodium monofluoroacetate), was first developed as an insecticide but in reality it’s a wide spectrum poison. It is at the center of a raging public controversy in New Zealand and Australia. 1080 is spread primarily to combat a marsupial possum “pest”, alleged to be a rapacious devourer of native flora, and accused of spreading bovine tuberculosis (Tb). 1080 is also used to kill rats said to be preying on and annihilating native birds. But as the story unfolds, it is not the rats or possums that are the threat to the ecosystem. It is a poison “industry” which has become a “gravy train” for bureaucrats...

Read more:
http://tasmaniantimes.com/index.php?%2Farticle%2Fthe-self-poisoning-of-new-zealand-by-name-and-by-nature%2F
Outline for a statement regarding aerial-1080 programme in New Zealand by Tony Orman The Self-Poisoning of New Zealand by Name and by Nature - New Zealand markets itself as “clean and green”…
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Paul White

Animal Welfare  - 
 
 
After supporting my thunderclap, for the launch of 'Conservation Redlist' magazine, I said I would keep you updated with what 'Boots on the Ground' are doing. (26th July 2016)
This is the project in Mali. I hope it gives you some idea of the commitment involved. (donations welcome as always)
https://youtu.be/zXM-s55pVhs
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DM101 L

Animal Welfare  - 
 
Please sign.
 
Please sign.

DEMAND AN END TO POACHING: SAVE TIGERS!
Tigers are one of the world’s most dazzling and majestic animals, but they are rapidly disappearing from the wild. Sign your name to demand an end to poaching and help stop the slaughter of tigers:

Petition Link:
http://go.saveanimalsfacingextinction.org/page/s/save-the-tiger?source=MS_EM_PET_2016.07.25_B2_save-tigers_X__F1_S1_C1__n
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DM101 L

Animal Welfare  - 
 
 
A huge wildfire burning since Friday in the Santa Clarita Valley area north of Los Angeles has tripled in size over the weekend to 33,172 acres, destroying at least 18 homes and leaving one man dead. More than 1,500 homes have been evacuated as 1,673 firefighters battle the Sand fire.
A huge wildfire burning since Friday in the Santa Clarita Valley area north of Los Angeles has tripled in size over the weekend to 33,172 acres, destroying at least 18 homes and leaving one man dead. More than 1,500 homes have been evacuated as 1,673 firefighters battle the Sand fire. ...
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DM101 L

Animal Welfare  - 
 
 
An unconventional and first-of-its-kind form of transportation infrastructure could be the answer to traveling across fjord-ridden Norway. Photo credit: Norwegian Public Roads AdministrationTo complete the 680-mile drive under current conditions, you would have to allow 21 hours for travel. Why? Tra...
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DM101 L

Animal Welfare  - 
 
 
Vietnam is now one of the world’s biggest illegal ivory markets. The number of items seen for sale had risen by over six times from 2008 to 2015, according to a survey report released recently by Save the Elephants.

No other country is known to be as active in both illegal imports of new raw tusks and illegal exports of the final ivory products. In total, 242 open outlets with 16,099 ivory items on display available for retail sale were found in Ho Chi Minh City, Buon Ma Thuot town, Hanoi and surrounding villages. This is compared to 2,444 items counted in a report published in 2008.

Ivory researchers, Lucy Vigne and Esmond Martin, found that the overwhelming majority of raw tusks sold wholesale in Vietnam are smuggled in from Africa, in contrast to the 2008 research conducted by Dan Stiles who found the majority of tusks to have originated from Vietnam, Cambodia and Laos. This shift presents a threat to Africa’s elephants.

Unlike other nations surveyed the number of ivory artisans in Vietnam has increased at least 10-fold since 2008 according to the study, with 79 ivory carvers/processors observed. Even though artisans in Vietnam will earn only USD200-400 a month (compared with USD875-2,000 in China), it is seen as lucrative.

“The key change,” said co-author Lucy Vigne, “was the expansion of the ivory trade in villages south of Hanoi. An increase in the number of Asian tourists in the Central Highlands area of Buon Ma Thuot, for example, has driven up demand causing the ivory business to flourish as it offers a relatively quick way to make money.”

A provision in the ban on the ivory trade in Vietnam permits any ivory obtained before 1992 to be traded within the country legally. Illegal traders appear oblivious to this, but if officials tried to confiscate their illegal ivory, traders could technically pass it off as pre-1992 stock with this loophole.

The illegally obtained ivory is usually in the form of small tusks or tusks cut into pieces of 1-3kg while the end products in most cases are pendants, mass produced jewellery, and other small items that are easily transportable. Mainland Chinese visitors accounted for about 75% of the buyers (as the same researchers found in Hong Kong in 2015). Although the price of raw ivory is the same as in China (between USD889 and USD1,334 per kilo), lower overheads, cheaper labour, machine production, and the absence of an identification system make ivory items cheaper in Vietnam and thus attractive to the mainland Chinese.

Ivory carving is relatively new in Vietnam. Artisans have carved wood, stone and other materials for over a thousand years, but ivory only began being used significantly as recently as the 19th century. Exploitation of the country’s natural resources in the 1990s prompted escalation of the ivory trade and by 2008 the price of raw ivory in Vietnam was between USD500-1,500 per kilo, the highest known price in the world at the time (Stiles 2008).

Skulls, bones and tail hairs of Asian elephants were on sale in addition to ivory. Substitutes for ivory in Vietnam include special woods like mulberry wood, and stones, but only one tiny item made of mammoth ivory was seen for sale. This will prevent any confusion for law enforcement between (legal) mammoth ivory and (illegal) elephant ivory.

Retail ivory trade thrived most where law enforcement was weak. In the northern villages where the bulk of artisans were seen, the majority of traders were relaxed and open and generally allowed photographs to be taken. The government has been a strong advocate for the production of handicrafts in these areas, allowing artisans to continue their trade unheeded. Vendors rarely commented on what was illegal and what was not. To them, their ivory items were simply another product on the market.

“Lackadaisical law enforcement at both Vietnamese and Chinese customs at the land borders has enabled the illegal ivory trade to flourish, and the illegal killing of elephants in Africa continues unabated. The Vietnamese government has done little to prevent ivory cyber trafficking, with ivory items openly for sale on online chats,” said Vigne and Martin.

Although a few signs to try to reduce demand for rhino horns were seen, no signs or posters against illegal ivory trade were observed. “A national strategic approach on ivory to improve law enforcement and awareness is lacking within the country. There is also inadequate global collaboration to tackle the illegal ivory trade. This is despite the fact that Vietnam was flagged as a significant transit country for ivory at the 16th CITES Conference of the Parties held in Bangkok in 2013. The main challenge is exposing the ‘big bosses’ operating in Africa and Vietnam rather than tackling the smaller players who can simply be substituted if caught, ” reported the authors.

Iain Douglas-Hamilton, Founder and CEO of Save the Elephants, stressed the need to close down such markets. “We have seen great gains made against the ivory trade over the past year, with a federal ban in the US, a timeline announced by Hong Kong and a presidential commitment from China. We must work together with governments to prevent markets from springing up elsewhere like Vietnam.”

Here are important selected statistics from the study

– Of all the ivory industries in Asia, Vietnamese artisans working on illegal ivory have multiplied and increased their production of these items the most rapidly since 2008.
– Nearly all tusks are smuggled into Vietnam from Africa, with only a few being sourced from domesticated and wild elephants in Laos and Vietnam.
– In 2015 wholesale prices for raw tusks in Vietnam were about the same as in mainland China, around USD 1,100/kg for a 1–3-kg tusk.
– Retail ivory prices for common comparable items were three times more in Beijing and Shanghai than in HCMC and Hanoi and seven times more than in the village selling the most worked ivory in northern Vietnam.
– In Ho Chi Minh City (HCMC), Hanoi, one town and village in the Central Highlands, and two villages in the north, researchers found 242 open outlets with 16,099 ivory items on display, available for retail sale.
– Of these items, 9,893 (or 61%) were in one northern village that had not previously been counted for a retail survey. Most objects are pendants and other small items, usually jewellery.
– There were few ivory antiques, the majority being in HCMC, popular with Chinese customers.
– Hardly any expensive ivory items for retail sale were seen. The most expensive new item was a 17-cm human figure for USD 2,500 in HCMC. The most expensive old items were a carved tusk and a large urn for USD 20,000 each in an antique shop in HCMC.
– Vietnam was flagged as a significant transit country for ivory at the 16th CITES Meeting held in Bangkok in 2013.
Vietnam's growing illegal ivory trade threatens Africa's elephants.
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DM101 L

Animal Welfare  - 
 
Please sign.
 
There is a global problem of many species being pushed to the brink of extinction. These include rhinos, tigers, primates, turtles, pangolins, reptiles, and manta rays. Wildlife is under siege, and one of the main causes is China and its insatiable demand for rare and exotic animals.
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Sophie Zhang

Animal Welfare  - 
 
Residents at a well-known Namibian tourist lodge on the banks of the Okavango River had to watch helplessly as a horrific slaughter of elephants played out in front of their eyes just across the border in Angola. At least five men armed with AK-47 automatic assault rifles attacked a group of about 40 elephants grazing peacefully in the long grass along the river.

Read more:
http://africageographic.com/blog/barbaric-elephant-slaughter-angola/
Barbaric elephant slaughter creates horror scene on the banks of the Okavango River.
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Sophie Zhang

Animal Welfare  - 
 
"People have deemed this incredibly ancient forest worthless, and they’ve decided the land it occupies could be better used for other things. And so they plan to bulldoze it, stack the trees in debris piles to rot, and build their more important parking lots and garbage dumps...."

Read more:
http://coyot.es/crossing/2016/07/24/the-giant-ancient-forest-you-cannot-see/#ixzz4FRFeLeke
Imagine we found a country the size of France covered in ancient forest, where trees a century old were mere saplings just getting started, where the oldest sprouted when near-mythical monsters roa...
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