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Jenny Dance English was on Dr Phil Hammond's Radio Bristol show over the weekend, talking about 'Say It'. She was interviewed along with Prof Lars Sundstrom (WEAHSN Director of Enterprise) about the Design Together Live Better project, and using Say It for speech therapy. You can listen to the clip here (40 mins in).

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+Sam Harding is part of an NBT team who have been awarded a place on the highly contested Research Design Service, Residential Retreat.
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Dr Yvonne Wren is on Ali Vowles programme Saturday morning. She will be talking about her contribution to the BBC2 programme World’s Weirdest Events. 

Congratulations to Sandra Wielaert, who has been awarded her PhD.  Her thesis is entitled 'Conversation is a two-way process'. Introducing conversation partner training in aphasia in Dutch rehabilitation practice.  Stay tuned for an overview of the project…..

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Congratulations to +Lydia Morgan & +Sam Harding for their nominations in the 'Striving for Excellence' category of the People's Awards at this mornings NBT research & innovation event.
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Professor George Davey Smith of Bristol University is on Life Scientific tomorrow (0900 and repeated 2130).  He talks to Jim al-Khalili about why some of us have long healthy lives and others don't. Is it down to social class or genetics?

The Professor is currently the director of ALSPAC.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b071t8qd

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For one night only, British journalist, author and presenter of BBC Radio 4’s Today programme Nick Robinson, will appear in front of a live audience to share anecdotal stories about his career as a broadcaster and his personal battle to regain his voice following lung cancer.

An Evening with Nick Robinson – “The Battle to Get My Voice Back” event will be brought to you by The Royal College of Speech and Language Therapists. It will be held on Thursday, 28 April 6.30pm – 9.30pm at America Square Conference Centre, London EC3N 2LB.

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Calling all Speech and Language Therapists (SLTs) who see people with Primary Progressive Aphasia (PPA):

PPA (a type of dementia) is a progressive language impairment. It is often diagnosed when people are in their 50s and 60s. Speech and language therapy services provided to this group are variable and anecdotally therapists report using many different approaches in managing this group.

Last summer Anna Volkmer was awarded an NIHR Doctoral Research Fellowship to complete a PhD at UCL, supervised by Dr Suzanne Beeke and Dr Aimee Spector. Her research will focus on refining and piloting an intervention for people with PPA.

The first stage of her research is to conduct a survey of current speech and language therapy practices across the UK. If you work with adults with neurological conditions and have seen someone with PPA in the last 24 months please consider completing her online survey. The link is: https://opinio.ucl.ac.uk/s?s=42060

You can follow the project on twitter @volkmer_anna or https://annavolkmersbigphdadventure.wordpress.com. Or email Anna at: a.volkmer.15@ucl.ac.uk

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The Bristol Speech& Language Therapy Research Unit are pleased to welcome Dr Penny Levickis

On Thursday 9th April from 3.00 to 5.00pm to speak on:
Population approaches to identification, prediction and outcomes of children with lasting language impairment.

Penny Levickis is a Post-doctoral Research Fellow in the Centre of Research Excellence in Child Language at the Murdoch Childrens Research Institute in Melbourne, Australia.   After developing a novel mechanism for the rigorous coding of a large number of parent-child interactions as part of her PhD, she demonstrated that specific maternal linguistic behaviours predict preschool language outcomes in a community-based sample of slow-to-talk toddlers. She is now extending this work to examine the extent to which maternal responsive behaviours may be measured in addition to the traditional use of low language status in the early years to identify those children most at risk of persistent language impairment. Penny and colleagues are also following up a large community-based cohort of children as they turn 9 years of age to develop a risk chart for health professionals to use as a method of predicting absolute risk of lasting language impairment. 
During the afternoon other members of the team at BSLTRU will present other ongoing research about Parent-Child Interaction Therapy.
Venue: Bristol Speech & Language Therapy Research Unit, Frenchay Hospital (This will be one of the last events in the research unit before it moves to our new Southmead offices) Bristol BS16 1LE.

There will be a small charge of £10, payable on arrival to support our costs. Please contact Fay.Smith@speech-therapy.org.uk to let us know if you are coming and/or for further details.
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