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Some people believe it is pointless to search for an ancestors motivation unless they have left a personal journal. However, I found strong clues to my great-great-grandfather's motivation for moving from state to state from an unlikely source. Thank you Doris Kearns Goodwin.
When I ask,Jesse Morgan,why did you go to Chautauqua County? And why did you leave there for Ohio? Most people just say "You'll never know." Really?
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Kathie “Kat” Gifford

Favorite resources  - 
 
Did you know that some people included in the U.S. 1940 Census were asked additional information? Built into the 16th census of the USA was a brand new initiative — the collection of a statistical sample of information for the purpose of extrapolating demographic data for the entire US. This means that 5% of individuals listed in the census, or approximately 2 on every page, were asked additional questions about their lives. Many researchers may already be aware of this–but for those who are new to census research, or who are simply not expecting the supplemental information, it can be easy to miss these ‘secret’ details. 5% may not seem like a lot, but given that most families have multiple members listed on a page your chances of having a relation included are pretty good.

How do you know if your ancestor was selected to provide additional details? Take a look at this census image below and you’ll see that entry number 42 has some additional text next to the number, ”Suppl. Quest.” This denotes that the individual was asked the important additional questions.

Where is this supplemental information found? Scroll down to the bottom of the census page and you’ll see a section that says “Supplementary Questions.” Look for the correct slot for your ancestor, in this case 42, to find the additional information.

What additional details were collected? Census.gov lists all of the questions that were asked on the 1940 census, including supplementary questions, on their website. The breakdown is below. To find information for other census years go here: https://www.census.gov/history/www/through_the_decades/index_of_questions/

Supplementary Questions
Name
Person’s father’s birthplace
Person’s mother’s birthplace
Person’s mother or native tongue

To Veterans
Is this person a veteran of the United States military forces; or the wife, widow, or under-18-year old child of a veteran?
If so enter “Yes”
If the person is a child of a veteran, is the veteran father dead?
War or military service
Enumerators were to mark “W” for World War I; “S” for the Spanish-American War, the Phillipine insurrection, or Boxer Rebellion; “SW” for both the Spanish-American War and World War I; “R” for peacetime service only; or “Ot” for any other war or expedition
Social Security: For persons 14 years old and over

Does this person have a federal Social Security number?
Were deductions for federal Old-Age Insurance or railroad retirement made from this person’s wages in 1939?
If so, were deductions made from all, one-half or more, or less than one-half of the person’s wages or salary?
What is this person’s usual occupation?
What is this person’s usual industry?
What class of worker is this person?

For all women who are or have been married:
Has this person been married more than once?
Age at first marriage
Number of children ever born

Where can I access the 1940 census records for free?
There are many places to find free census records online. We recommend FamilySearch. Find the search page for the 1940 census here: http://familyhistorydaily.com/genealogy-resources/50-free-genealogy-sites/

The National Archives also hosts the 1940 census for free, but the records must be browsed though by location.

You can find more ideas for where to locate this resource and many other free genealogy records here.

Happy Searching!

Extra Census Tip: Always check the page directly before and after your ancestors’ entries on the census as you will often find relatives living nearby.

Image: US Department of Agriculture. “An enumerator visits a farmer for the 1940 Census. One of the fifty questions Americans were asked in 1940 was, ‘Does the person’s household live on a farm?'” Credit: Library of Congress, LC-USZ62-91199


http://familyhistorydaily.com/genealogy-help-and-how-to/the-secret-details-in-the-1940-census-you-may-be-missing/

#genealogy #1940USCensus #genealogywebsites



http://familyhistorydaily.com/genealogy-help-and-how-to/the-secret-details-in-the-1940-census-you-may-be-missing/
The 1940 census of the United States is a particularly exciting one for genealogists for a number of reasons -- the most obvious being that is was only ind
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WF Tristan

Suggestions on Software  - 
 
 
#genealogy   #familyhistory  

Great site for tracing you family tree
What will you ask your ancestors? Ask the Ancestors makes family history research a lot easier and lets you reconnect with missing branches of your family tree and kith and kin around the world by allowing you to search our world wide and growing library of family trees to find your ancestors.
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Tanner Sousley

Discussion  - 
 
The shocking story I just uncovered this past week of my great great grandparent's. Generational Alcoholism, abuse, and....huh? MURDER, SUICIDE?!
My Grandma Bruce always remained a big question to me growing up and even when I began doing genealogy. I was always unsure who she was and every time she was mentioned, I had to ask “Who is that again”? You see, she is th...
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Helen Lutke's profile photoTanner Sousley's profile photo
2 comments
 
+Helen Lutke thank you! :)
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James Ellison

Discussion  - 
 
Death certificates are a well-known source of data, but even the most well-known #records can have some hidden tales! #lookagain #deathcertificate #genealogy #RootsBid

http://rootsbid.com/blog/top-5-things-you-didnt-know-about-a-death-certificate/
I find it interesting to look through old death records. You can glean a lot of information from that one piece of paper. I am talking about the death records typically kept post-1910. Not all states were keeping death records regularly until the first quarter of the 20th century. Because it was a state responsibility …
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Marianne Perry's profile photoDerek Whitten's profile photo
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Interesting read! I've had a couple of certificates where some of the facts didn't align exactly to what I had already researched. It hadn't occurred to me to look at the informant - it will be interesting to go back and see who those people were and how that might have affected the accuracy of the record.
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Katherine Schober

Tips and Tricks  - 
 
Frustrated with all those German abbreviations? Here are the 19 of the most common with their meanings explained. #genealogy

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Sandy Schilling Payne's profile photoKatherine Schober's profile photo
4 comments
 
Glad you liked it!
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James Ellison

Discussion  - 
Ten tips for transcription, when not followed, may alter the interpretation of the data and meaning of the document incorrectly.
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Kathie “Kat” Gifford

Favorite resources  - 
 
This site includes sites to research emigration, immigration and naturalization, 100+ passenger list sites, ethnic research, libraries and archives, passenger ship types, descriptions and images, and additional worldwide maritime information available both on-line and off-line. Looking for your ancestor's passenger list when they arrived in North America? Does your life include adoption? Lots of resources here. Just type in the surname you are looking for in the search box to the left and see what comes up!

If you are among the millions of people whose life has been touched by adoption, please visit this new section of our site (currently under construction). Adoptees and birth family members wishing to reunite can find many resources.


http://www.immigrantships.net/

#genealogy #ImmigrantPassengerLists #Adopted
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Even genealogists need a laugh...or is it a nightmare?
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Uncle Ñoño “Gwamps” Kingston's profile photoericnsabrina gaskins's profile photo
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+Uncle Ñoño Kingston . Your interpretation of the scriptures are bazaar at best. Rationalization is the biggest reason we are in this pickle today. People can rationalize anything and you just proved it. However, it doesn't make it right. Good luck to you. By reading your scenarios, it looks like you're going to need it. .. 😇 
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About this community

A place where professional and amateur genealogist come to share advice, help with brick walls and talk genealogy.
 
Interesting problem with the name "Carter", especially along the Canadian border areas in Upstate, NY and Vermont:

The Great Deerfield Raid captive, John Carter, was taken prisoner as a child and changed his name to Jean Baptiste Joseph Chartier and refused to be "rescued" later when his family found him(probably "Stockholm Syndrome"). At least one of his children and several grandchildren fought for the Colonies during the American Revolution in "The Second Canadian Regiment". After the war, some changed their name back to Carter, some kept Chartier, and some changed to a phonetic equivalent, "Sharkee" or "Sharkey". At about that same time, Carters, who had not changed their name moved into the same area, as did families named "Choret" (Charette). Well, the approximate meaning of the name Choret is "Cart Maker"..... yup..... some "Americanized" their name to ...."Carter". I have some connections to ALL three groups in my records and have to work to keep them in order.
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Helen Lutke's profile photoAnthony McPherson's profile photo
2 comments
 
+Helen Lutke LOL!... yes, I can imagine. Luckily for my the "Carters" don't come close enough for me to have too many problems, but my wife was a "Charette".
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There's a page that I keep up to date about my genealogy life and the this that I find along the way.
So have a look and follow!
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WF Tristan

Suggestions on Software  - 
 
 
Looking to build your family tree or research your ancestors ?
This is well worth a look as its cheaper than pretty much every other #genealogy  website out there.

#family   #ancestry   #genealogists   #familytree   #moneysaving  
What will you ask your ancestors? Ask the Ancestors makes family history research a lot easier and lets you reconnect with missing branches of your family tree and kith and kin around the world by allowing you to search our world wide and growing library of family trees to find your ancestors.
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Amanda Kay Howell

European Ancestry  - 
 
2016's 67th Blessing of the Fleet in Bayou La Batre, AL with BLB Historian Amanda Kay Howell.  at St. Margaret's Catholic Church Footage Events, National anthem by the Alma Bryant High School Marching Band, Blessing given by Archbishop of Mobile, AL Thomas John Rodi
The tradition of the Blessing of the Fleet dates back to legends from Sicily.
It is to ask God to keep fishermen safe at sea and bless their harvest.
It is also a remembering of those localy lost at sea.

"May God in Heaven fulfill abundantly the prayers which are
pronounced over you and your boats and equipment on the occasion of the Blessing of the Fleet. God bless your going out and coming in; The Lord be with you at home and on the water. May he accompany you when you start on your many journeys: May he fill your nets abundantly as a reward for your labor; And may he bring you all safely in, when you turn your boats homeward to shore. Amen"

Check out other videos covering the history of Bayou La Batre at my Channel....
https://www.youtube.com/user/AmandaKayHowell
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www.parivartree .com

Asian Ancestry  - 
 
Check out "bringing families together" on Indiegogo http://igg.me/at/yBGH42S4Fec/shre/14514364
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Kathie “Kat” Gifford

Suggestions on Software  - 
 
Create a history and document it with pictures, stories, voice and timeline about anything you care about..your family, an historical event, a vacation, a school experience...anything. See more at:

https://www.thehistoryproject.com/
Your living time capsule to collect artifacts and share stories. Join the movement to capture, preserve, and connect with the life narratives that transcend generations.
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daryl bird

European Ancestry  - 
 
Surname Bird history 
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Mary Grether

Brick Walls  - 
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Genealogy research detective
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Kathie “Kat” Gifford

Favorite resources  - 
 
Tracked your ancestor back to Germany and thinking, "Now what?" http://www.germanroots.com/

#genealogy #GermanGenealogy 
Genealogy resources and research information for Americans with German ancestors. With links to online databases. Formerly the wee-monster genealogy website.
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Kathie “Kat” Gifford

Favorite resources  - 
 
Genealogists...Canada is distinguished from most other countries by the diversity of its population. Our unique cultural, ethnic and linguistic mosaic is reflected in the wide assortment of holdings at Library and Archives Canada associated with the different ethno-cultural groups.

The holdings include: immigration records and guides, travel guides, passenger lists, letters, diaries, journals, memoirs, newspapers (some ethnic titles), maps, art, photographs, music and film.

Immigration resources have been sorted into three categories:

Immigration Records
Citizenship and Naturalization Records
Immigration History: Ethnic and Cultural Groups

http://www.bac-lac.gc.ca/eng/discover/immigration/Pages/introduction.aspx

#genealogy #CanadaRecords 
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Steve Johnson

Favorite resources  - 
 
Interment.net had it largest period of growth last month... #genealogy #cemeteries
Over 500000 more cemetery records were added to our archives in the month of June 2016, marking our largest one-month growth ever!
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