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Michelle Anya

Discussion  - 
 
So after 20 some years of tracing, tracking, etc. I recently unearthed a cousin connection between myself and my mother-in-law. It's distant however we have one common ancestor that had two sons, her line is from the eldest son. Mine from the younger, that made for an interesting phone call. :D
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Fernando Morales Jr's profile photoVince Sloan's profile photo
3 comments
 
My family has a few also.
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You know how Garrison Keillor talks about the Norwegian Bachelor Farmers?  Well, I have  a couple of German bachelor farmers in my family tree. Until older one died and younger one finally married.
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Ron Walter's profile photoVera Marie Badertscher's profile photo
2 comments
 
Since he didn't marry until he was 50, I'd say it took more than ten years!
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Deborah Raymond

Discussion  - 
 
Seeking information on ggf.  Patrick Harkins born in Ireland 7/18/1829-2/22/1875, immigrated to Pennsylvania.  Married Mary Whitman in Pennsylvania 1848. She was born in Pa. 8/12/1831-4/8/1901.  They moved to Bloomfield, Lawrence Co., Ohio where they are buried in Vega Cemetery.  Cannot locate either parents' names.  Any help appreciate
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Deborah Raymond's profile photoKevin McCormack's profile photo
4 comments
 
Ill give them to you tomorrow. Just put my name out there.....reg Ireland. Dont get too bogged down with the date and year. More often than not they were out. They had to give a date later in life.
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Mark Rabideau

European Ancestry  - 
 
I have updated and revised the ManyRoads Eastern German Expulsion & Flight area.  The area contains a large Photo Gallery, sets of Maps, as well as Texts & White Papers. You may find the materials at: 

http://www.many-roads.com/libraries/prussia-histories/die-vertreibung/

Feel free to share this with anyone you believe might be interested.
Eastern German Expulsions & Flight (1944-1950+) This page represents our Vertreibung/ Flucht (German Expulsion) collection. If you would like a 'quick' background on those topics most relevant ...
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Mark Rabideau

Favorite resources  - 
 
Updated & enhanced our free Quaker Genealogy Information and Links
http://goo.gl/4dgHLz
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Tony Proctor

Discussion  - 
 
Old Dogs, News Tricks

As well as taking a brief look at the relationship between evidence, inference, and conjecture, I also want to explain why it’s so important to remember the level to which each of your statements is substantiated. If we accidentally promote some statement beyond that level then we will be distorting our knowledge, and hence our representation of history.

#Genealogy  
#
As well as taking a brief look at the relationship between evidence, inference, and conjecture, I also want to explain why it’s so important to remember the level to which each of your statements is substantiated. If we accid...
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In #52 Ancestors last week, I continued looking at my father's family. It is relatively easy to find out what men did for a living. Not quite so obvious what they did for recreation. Several  of my father's uncles and cousins played instruments in a community band. David Kaser was one of those--a hard worker at several different jobs, I like to think he got some relaxation blowing on his Tuba.
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Jamie Cox

Tips and Tricks  - 
 
I have posted previously about using off-camera flash to make readable photos of old tombstones. (You can google "off-camera flash gravestone" to find my video & related photos).  However, previously, I had been using a DSLR camera to do these photos. For a recent genealogy trip to Missouri, I left my big camera at home, and took only a compact camera. I also brought a speedlight flash, remote trigger and an optical trigger. I found this to work very well in most situations. The "After" photo shown here was taken as follows: Cloudy conditions, flash at 1/4 power, Camera set to "P" (program) mode, built-in flash on, Exposure compensation ("EV") set to -1. I held the transmitter with attached optical trigger right in front of the camera's built-in flash, actually blocking the built-in flash from reaching the subject. This triggered the speedlight flash held beside the tombstone by my assistant. This resulted in an exposure of 1/320 second at f/4 with ISO 80. The particular camera settings are much less important than the lighting. The camera was a Canon S100, but many compact cameras could have taken virtually the same photo with this setup.
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Jean McPherron's profile photoStephanie Smith's profile photo
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David Sankey

Discussion  - 
 
A proper Charley
William Anthony 1789-1863. Behold the face of history! Photographed in 1863, the year of his death, but born in 1789, the year of the French Revolution, seventy-four-year-old William Anthony trudged the streets of Spitalfields and Norton Folgate through the darkest nights and thickest fogs for ...
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David Sankey's profile photoJemma-Chandrika Downes's profile photo
3 comments
 
+Jemma-Chandrika Downes , exactly, and the phrases (possibly dying out now) "a right Charley" or "a proper Charley", mostly self-deprecating, as in "I dropped the water  and felt a proper Charley", are probably derived from the  Watchmen.... ..as it was a job that didn't over-rely on intellect
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About this community

A place where professional and amateur genealogist come to share advice, help with brick walls and talk genealogy.

Anthony Shepherd

European Ancestry  - 
 
Any ony hav ancestors from Suffolk in ENGLAND
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Anthony Shepherd's profile photo
 
Researching Shepherd Family
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Lisa Lanning

Discussion  - 
 
I have hit a dead end on my Lanning family lineage. Can anyone help me out. My three times great grandfather was George Lanning Born May 15, 1841 in Ohio, Died October 21, 1914 Sidney, Montcalm, Michigan. His death certificate says his parents were John Lanning and Erma Underwood or Sherwood, her name is very difficult to decipher.
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Michael Wader's profile photoMark Rabideau's profile photo
10 comments
 
+Michael Wader My pleasure Michael... archive.org is an amazing place to hunt for 19th century upper mid-west family history.  Those upper mid-westerners certainly liked writing stories about their forebears and now its all free for the reading.
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Daniel Smerda

European Ancestry  - 
 
Does anyone have any good resources I am trying to find out more information about a surname from the Poland/Germany area back in the 1800's
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Turia Clark Day's profile photoDaniel Smerda's profile photo
2 comments
 
Lilla is the last name trying to find information about a Joseph Lilla Sr
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Mark Rabideau

Discussion  - 
 
If you are interested in the history of French Canada, I have just uploaded several dozen new texts for both the 1837 Patriot Rebellion & the Expulsion of the French (aka. Grand Derangement) from Acadia (Acadie) in 1755. 
http://goo.gl/JTBFsk
http://goo.gl/zVNssy
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Henry Singer's profile photoMark Rabideau's profile photo
2 comments
 
Mine as well cousin.... ;)
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Most widows remarried fairly quickly, or turned over farming chores to their oldest sons or their brothers. Not Mary Kaser.  She told the census taker she was the head of household, and her occupation was farmer.
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Henry Singer

Discussion  - 
 
I have an idea to leverage DNA data with a family tree as a means to determine the common ancestor of the individuals with whom I share segments of chromosomes and to whom I am presumably related.

In the linked document I start with a standard pedigree view of a family tree.

On the second chart I introduce the group of people that I am possibly related to as suggested by a DNA test, such as 23andme. I arrange the people in a network with myself as the central node, with the distance from myself reflecting the number of generations to the common ancestor. I connect the nodes of the network based upon evidence of shared segments as provided by a chromosome browser, and cluster them accordingly. This work is speculative, and assumes independence of ancestors (which I know is not strictly true).

On the third chart I attempt to map the connections from the network on the second chart to the pedigree view on the first chart. I use known common ancestors of my connections, such as first and second cousins, to facilitate the clustering and mapping. I iterate as appropriate with new data.

What do you think of this approach? Is it possible? What are the gaps in my assumptions?

Thanks.
Drive
Your TreeBuilding Your Tree Mapping DNA connections
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Henry Singer's profile photoJody Lutter's profile photo
8 comments
 
Testing multiple close relatives has enabled me group the matches to specific branches.  This is a lot of work.  Plus, people taking these tests do not understand this approach.  If there was a program to check matches against close relatives and formulate branches of the tree, that would be great.
But such a program would also need to work for someone who can't test close relatives, such as an adoptee.
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Henry Singer

Discussion  - 
 
I have an idea that I would like some feedback on.

Can a pedigree view of your relatives be constructed probabilistically using a combination of data about the shared DNA segments across many relatives, the expected similarities and some information about known relatives?
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Jody Lutter's profile photoHenry Singer's profile photo
2 comments
 
+Jody Lutter see my new post with a link to a document.
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The #52Ancestors theme this week was heirlooms.  I've already written about several, so instead wrote about the son of the man who made this beautiful handkerchief chest. The son's life was cut short by a cherry tree.
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Mark Rabideau

European Ancestry  - 
Welcome to the ManyRoads German/ Prussian Help Center! If you are new to Prussian/ German research or just 'stumped' for additional clues and resources, hopefully this page will provide new sources...
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Tony Proctor

Discussion  - 
 
Light-Bulb Moments

Listening to the continuing discussions within FHISO (http://fhiso.org), I have to wonder whether something is missing; something that's fundamentally necessary for the production of a data standard for genealogy. Let me start with a question: how many programmers does it take to change a light bulb?


#Genealogy   #FHISO  
Listening to the continuing discussions within FHISO, I have to wonder whether something is missing; something that's fundamentally necessary for the production of a data standard for genealogy. Let me start with a question: ...
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