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Nitty Buzz

Brick Walls  - 
 
+1 my post of your last name is Webb, Hood, Harrison, or Cruz or Balmer
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I love transcribing English parish registers. Occasionally you can come across wonderful entries such as this one I recently found in the parish register for Over, in Cambridgeshire:

"John Pearson aged aboue threeschore years, was married to Ann Heard aged 16, who was his Grand daughter, ye dauther of his wiues own daughter, whom I thought to have been his wiues daughter in Law onely, this remarkeable marriage was solemnized in Over Church on May ye 3d by virtue of a lic."
http://ukga.org/cgi-bin/search.cgi?action=ViewRec&DB=8&recid=236711
A free transcript of the marriage record for John Pearson and Anne Heard in 1687, in the parish of Over, Cambridgeshire, England.
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UK Genealogy Archives's profile photoCris P.'s profile photo
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Cris P.
 
Thanks for the link, Dorset figures in a small way in my family, Witchampton and Weymouth,
I had to smile when I read your notes. A few years ago I was involved in renovating an old house in Devon, the inside was timber framed and clad in tongue & groove boards which all got removed. On the back of them were pencilled notes written by children when it was built, some gave names and addresses, the descendants still lived in the village well over 100 years later. And I found a slate on the roof that was very neatly scratched on the underside with someone's arithmetic. 
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Tony Proctor

Discussion  - 
 
A Copyright Casualty — Part II

In the first part of this series of articles, 'A Copyright Casualty — Part I', I introduced an ancestor, William Ashbee, who had ventured into publishing to produce a mercantile directory of London, only to find himself on the wrong side of a copyright suit. I now want to look at the detail of the case, and the consequences for William, modern genealogists, and the digital world in general.

#Genealogy #Copyright  
In the first part of this series of articles, A Copyright Casualty — Part I, I introduced an ancestor, William Ashbee, who had ventured into publishing to produce a mercantile directory of London, only to find himself on the ...
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Kathie “Kat” Gifford

European Ancestry  - 
 
Finding Your Ancestor’s Grave (Or Not).....Many people come to Germany to find their ancestor’s graves. Unfortunately, in Germany graves are cleared after a few decades (20 to 30 years) to make room for new graves. Therefore, you will hardly ever find graves of your ancestors, who died some 100 years ago.  

Also, sometimes when a grave is cleared, the name is mentioned on a family gravestone, but this does not mean that this person is actually buried there. Actually they might even have been buried in a different town.

If the family had a large monument next to a cemetery wall it is often kept and sometimes even sold to other families who keep it and pay for the maintenance; they either to use it as a place of burial for their own family or just to see to it that it is saved.

Therefore, before you come to Germany, it may be wise to check with the local church or, if the cemetery belongs to the local community, with the so called Friedhofsamt. You will find the way to contact them through the website of the municipality. Some municipalities (for example Berlin) do charge a fee for this kind of information, others do not. Also be aware that it might take time until they answer, in some parts of Berlin it can take about 6 months as they have to take care of burials as well, which, obviously, has first priority.

It is different for Jewish cemeteries. These graves were principally not cleared, however, many Jewish cemeteries were desecrated and destroyed during the Third Reich. Sometimes the cemetery ‘simply’ was destroyed and the tombstones knocked over, sometime the tombstones were taken and used for road construction (which was actually done with Christian German tombstones in Poland after the war). Today, many people are involved in saving the Jewish cemeteries and honoring those who were once buried there and most cemeteries are under preservation.

http://worldwidegenealogy.blogspot.nl/2015/08/finding-your-ancestors-grave-or-not.html

#germangraves   #genealogy  
Many of my clients come to Germany to find their ancestor’s graves. Unfortunately, in Germany graves are cleared after a few decades (20 to 30 years) to make room for new graves. Therefore, you will hardly ever find graves of...
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Cris P.
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Nigel , I live in Devon and I've been in one or two churches for a look around, there's a good one in Launceston, Cornwall. Very ornate outside.
I wish I could get around a few cemeteries and photograph headstones, unfortunately, my circumstances now make it difficult. I know people are doing it and putting them on line. A very kind person gave me a password to his, all around north wales, I found several photos on his site relating to my family.
If I get a chance I'll do the same, Lyndhurst and Lymington in Hampshire, a couple in Sandbach, Cheshire, Biddulph, Stoke-on-Trent and Stogursey, Somerset would be my priorities
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Tanner Sousley

Discussion  - 
 
Ive shared this before but ive read it over and over again and decided its worth sharing a second time. All throughout history our ancestors have shown their strength. One day we'll have the chance to show ours. Whether we pass or fail the test of fate, the outcome is always meant to be.
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Maps can make the narrative so much clearer, I think.  I used two in this #52 ancestors post about my husband's great-great grandfather.
My husband, Ken Badertscher's 2nd great-grandfather, Samuel Frederich Schneiter. I learned the little I know about Samuel by tracing the female line.
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Vince Sloan's profile photoVera Marie Badertscher's profile photo
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They help in so many ways. I love tracing their migration routes from the East coast as they moved toward Ohio--and sometimes further.
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***Order your family tree painting before the summer sale ends on August 31st and get 25% off. 
Please visit http://familytreeforyou.com/family-tree-prices.html for more details.

#familytreepainting #summersale #familytreeart #genealogicaltreeart
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Anyone researching any of the following families in Pennsylvania? I am trying to break down some brick walls.

Himmelberger
Meck
Houser
Winter
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Melody Lassalle

Discussion  - 
 
A little history on the leper colony at Molokai, Hawaii.  My great grandfather had leprosy but avoided deportation.  He lived his last few years in Oakland, California http://www.researchjournal.yourislandroutes.com/2015/08/leprosy-and-the-formation-of-the-molokai-colony/
In the early 1860s, people began to show signs of the disease, leprosy, in the Hawaiian Islands. As fear fomented, the King acted, exiling those stricken with the disease to isolation on the island of Molokai.
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All I have is the article from the San Francisco Call 11 April 1910, with his name slightly misspelled.  "Raymond Pamaula, a leper, 28 years of age, who has been confined in the isolation hospital five years and six months, died Friday evening.  He had been confined to his bed more than two years.  This is the third death since the patients have been confined in the camp, two from natural causes, and one suicide."
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About this community

A place where professional and amateur genealogist come to share advice, help with brick walls and talk genealogy.
 

4 Generation DNA Inheritance Study by Roberta Estes
Posted on August 23, 2015


I’ve {Roberta}  recently had the opportunity to perform two, 4-generation, inheritance studies.

In both of these cases, we have the DNA of 4 generations: grandmother, parent, child and grandchild or grandchildren.  I’ll be using the second study because there are two great-grandchildren to compare.

I wanted, with real data, to address some assertions and assumptions that I see being made periodically in the genetic genealogy community.  We need to know if these hold up to scrutiny, or not.  Besides that, it’s just fun to see what happens to DNA with 4 generations and 5 people to compare.

What kinds of information are we looking to confirm or refute in this study?

1 – That small segments don’t occur within a couple generations, meaning that that DNA can’t be or isn’t broken into small segments that quickly.

2 – That small segments can never be used genealogically and are not useful.

3 – That DNA is most of the time passed in 50% packages.  While this is true in the first generation, meaning a child does receive half of each parent’s DNA, they do not receive 25% of each grandparent’s DNA.

4 – That segments over a certain threshold, like 5 or 7 cM, are all reliable as IBD (identical by descent.)

5 – That segments under a certain threshold, like 5 or 7 cM are all unreliable and should never be used, in fact, cannot ever be used and should be discarded.

6 – That there is a rule that you cannot have more than two crossovers per chromosome.

All individuals tested at Family Tree DNA and we’ll be using the FTDNA chromosome browser for comparisons.

For the results, click on the link below.

http://dna-explained.com/2015/08/23/4-generation-inheritance-study/
I’ve recently had the opportunity to perform two, 4-generation, inheritance studies. In both of these cases, we have the DNA of 4 generations: grandmother, parent, child and grandchild or grandchil...
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Devon Lee

Brick Walls  - 
 
The Townsends of Ohio my Brick Wall. I'm working through the Townsends for in the 1880s US  Census in Franklin County, Ohio in attempts to find connections. Do you have Townsend relatives in Ohio? #genealogy   #brickwalls   #genealogy  
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Thanks +Rex Messick for the support!
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I get white dress envy when I look at these pictures from my mother's early teaching career between 1923 and 1934. #52Ancestors Back to School
My mother, Harriette Anderson (Kaser) had a career as a teacher, although she thought she would be a doctor. She kept lots of photos from her teaching.
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Julie Klein

Discussion  - 
 
I would like to share a fun story.  My grandfather told a story about when he first came to America and was traveling from NY to Kansas City, Missouri, where other family members had settled.  It was the 4th of July, which meant nothing to him at the time.  He was on a train when it crashed, with many people dying and strewn around the landscape.  My grandfather said that since he spoke no English and was unharmed, he just left the scene, walked away.  He said that he claimed the 4th of July for his birthday from that day forward.

The story always sounded made up to us.  However, in the late 1970's, a cousin of mine wrote to the newspaper near where the crash supposedly happened.  The newspaper article verified the story exactly as our grandfather told it.  He wasn't named, but it did say that a few people walked away unharmed.  Not all seemingly exaggerated stories are not true. 
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I'm not sure what you mean by "your" (i.e. my crash). The July 3 crash is your crash in Litchfield IL. (I replaced the word "this" in my previous message with "the Litchfield" to be more clear.) The one I first mentioned (the 1912 Corning train wreck) happened on July 4, 1912 near Corning NY.
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Tanner Sousley

Discussion  - 
 
Uncovering a legacy that has been overshadowed for far too long. 
They say “The Apple doesn’t fall far from the tree”. Thomas Walker Kerr…. It’s a family name, and for me it’s one that brings thoughts of abandonment, unfaithfulness, and depression. My Great Grandfather, who I talked abou...
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Tony Proctor

Discussion  - 
 
A Copyright Casualty — Part I

Not many of us will have found an ancestor who had fallen victim to a case of copyright infringement, but fewer still will have found an ancestor who was involved in an important copyright case — one that is still cited in modern textbooks because of its unusual circumstances.


#Genealogy #Copyright  
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Tanner Sousley

Discussion  - 
 
When a family rumor turns out to be but a myth!
My 4th Great Grandfather, John Leigh Hunt has remained an enigma in my family tree until I had some time off from work. An enigma no more, I have placed together a firm and quite impressive illustration of his life through re...
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Nitty Buzz

European Ancestry  - 
 
Anyone out there have military family in Louisiana??- +Nitty Buzz​ from Philly
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Tanner Sousley

Discussion  - 
 
Sometimes Breaking down brick walls is hard. Especially with Bohemian ancestors. In the story is a link to the online Prague archives, Very Helpful!
Frustration has been in my routine frequently lately. Over the course of this last week I have been taking my free time to look through old Czech church books in Latin, Czech, and German. Not only do I have a hard time re...
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Frustration!!!
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John mcgurk

European Ancestry  - 
 
John mcGurk,   Passage west , Ireland    born 1875(ish)    looking for information on this family
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Colleen Carson's profile photoJohn mcgurk's profile photo
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great stuff ,the search is on for Owen mcgurk
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We know with absolute certainty that everyone alive today descends from people who lived in antiquity - the mission impossible is to prove it with verified genealogical records.
We know with absolute certainty that everyone alive today descends from people who lived in antiquity - the mission impossible is to prove it with verified genealogical records.
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