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Attention U.S. TCM Subscribers: Immediately following Citizen Kane is one of film noir's finest, Gun Crazy. Noir's most distinguishing feature, a focus on their criminal participants' psychology, marks a major shift regarding motive: In the earlier "gangster" films, money and power provided enough reason for the pursuit of illegal gains whereas in noir, the internal cause behind the action is paramount, and runs so much deeper... and darker. My review, plus Wednesday's early morning showtime information throughout the U.S. can be seen here: http://thecinemacafe.com/the-cinema-treasure-hunter/2015/4/6/now-listen-to-me#Gun-Crazy
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Attention U.S. TCM Subscribers: After World War II, many returning servicemen were disillusioned to find jobs were scarce and their wives’ (or girlfriends’) faithfulness even scarcer. The Best Years of Our Lives addresses this reality head on when the Dana Andrews character finds it impossible to please either his previous employer or trophy wife upon his return to civilian life. Perhaps for this narrative distinction, authors Borde and Chaumeton in the filmography of their highly respected book Panorama of American Film Noir 1941 - 1953, and the first to be published on the subject, included The Best Years of Our Lives as film noir. (More here including Saturday afternoon's showtime information throughout the U.S.): http://thecinemacafe.com/the-cinema-treasure-hunter/2017/11/1/now-listen-to-me#Best-Years-of-Our-Lives
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Obviously neo-noir, but it is always interesting to see how noir resonates with other cultures and we're lucky to be able to appreciate it in today's global cinema.

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Another Top Ten Cinematic Images have been posted to the Cinema Cafe website with a link to all of the others. Which is your favourite? http://thecinemacafe.com/the-cinema-treasure-hunter/2017/11/6/sa799fxp7todg0h66b8ohwrdjics71

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Attention U.S. TCM Subscribers: Complaining about the far-fetched circumstances in film noir is like objecting to the lack of realism in a Picasso painting. What I mean is that lovers of these criminally rich cinematic delights oughtn’t to bother picking out the implausibilities, as it is practically a staple of the category. These thoughts immediately came to mind when confronted with the relatively little known noir thriller Split Second (1953), about a criminal gang on the run, hostages in tow, who have purposely chosen a nuclear testing site as their hide out, one that is set to be employed sooner than they expect. (A few more 'non-spoiler' words here including TCM's Sunday morning showtime information across the U.S.): http://thecinemacafe.com/the-cinema-treasure-hunter/2017/11/1/now-listen-to-me#Split-Second
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Attention U.S. TCM Subscribers: “What did it matter where you lay once you were dead? In a dirty sump or in a marble tower on top of a high hill? You were dead, you were sleeping the big sleep, you were not bothered by things like that …” Thus, the title of Raymond Chandler’s first Philip Marlowe private detective novel is explained in his book, although absent in the two subsequent film translations of 1946’s The Big Sleep. (More here including Saturday late afternoon's showtime information throughout the U.S.): http://thecinemacafe.com/the-cinema-treasure-hunter/2017/11/1/now-listen-to-me#Big-Sleep
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