Today's Mortgage Rates
Actual mortgage interest rates & APRs may vary based on credit history. Rates displayed assume that an escrow account for property taxes and insurance(s) will be established at time of loan closing.

Conventional-Indiana Rate (%) APR (%) Points (%)
Conforming 30 Year Fixed Rate 4.125 4.177 0.000
Conforming 20 Year Fixed Rate 3.875 3.946 0.000
Conforming 15 Year Fixed Rate 3.250 3.340 0.000
ARM-Indiana Rate (%) APR (%) Points (%)
5 Year Adjustable Rate-Libor 3.250 3.391 0.125
7 Year Adjustable Rate-Libor 3.625 3.552 0.125
FHA-Indiana Rate (%) APR (%) Points (%)
FHA 30 Year Fixed Rate 3.750 5.282 0.000
FHA 15 Year Fixed Rate 3.500 4.524 0.000
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#3

Figure out how much house you can afford
The buyer's mantra: Get a home that's financially comfortable.

There are various rules of thumb that will help you get an idea of how much home you can afford. If you're using FHA financing, as almost one-fifth of buyers get FHA-insured loans, your home payment can't exceed 31 percent of your monthly income. But, with some mitigating factors, FHA will let you go higher.

For conventional loans, a safe formula is that home expenses should not exceed 28 percent of your gross monthly income, says Susan Tiffany, director of consumer periodicals for the Credit Union National Association.

For a rough assessment of how much house you can afford, check out Bankrate's new house calculator.

Improve your chances by: trying on that financial obligation long before you sign the mortgage papers, says Tiffany. Before you home shop, calculate the mortgage payment for the home in your intended price range, along with the increased expenses (such as taxes, insurance and utilities). Then bank the difference between that and what you're paying now.

Not only does it allow you to build a nice nest egg, but "you can back away from it," or scale back, if the payments start to pinch, she says.

step 2
Figure out how much house you can afford
The buyer's mantra: Get a home that's financially comfortable.

There are various rules of thumb that will help you get an idea of how much home you can afford. If you're using FHA financing, as almost one-fifth of buyers get FHA-insured loans, your home payment can't exceed 31 percent of your monthly income. But, with some mitigating factors, FHA will let you go higher.

For conventional loans, a safe formula is that home expenses should not exceed 28 percent of your gross monthly income, says Susan Tiffany, director of consumer periodicals for the Credit Union National Association.

For a rough assessment of how much house you can afford, check out Bankrate's new house calculator.

Improve your chances by: trying on that financial obligation long before you sign the mortgage papers, says Tiffany. Before you home shop, calculate the mortgage payment for the home in your intended price range, along with the increased expenses (such as taxes, insurance and utilities). Then bank the difference between that and what you're paying now.

Not only does it allow you to build a nice nest egg, but "you can back away from it," or scale back, if the payments start to pinch, she says.

6 must-do's before buying a home


1.


Strengthen your credit score
"It's a brave, new world with respect to credit requirements for mortgages," says John Ulzheimer, president of consumer education at smartcredit.com and formerly of FICO, which pioneered credit scoring.

One old rule still applies: The higher your credit score, the lower your down payment and monthly payments.

"Below 660 or 680, you're either going to have to pay sizable fees or a higher down payment," Zigas says. And that's pretty much the cutoff score for getting a mortgage, he says.

Vicki Bott, deputy assistant secretary for single-family housing at the Department of Housing and Urban Development, says that her office has noticed much the same thing. "While there are many qualified borrowers in the 580 range, the market today is probably (looking for) 640 to 660, at a minimum," Bott says.

On the other end, a score of 700 to 720 will get you a good deal and 750 and above will garner the best rates on the market, Ulzheimer says.

Improve your chances by: pulling your credit reports and ensuring you're not being unfairly penalized for old, paid or settled debts, Zigas says.

Stop applying for new credit a year before you apply for financing. And keep the moratorium in place until after you close on your home, Ulzheimer says.

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Where to find your credit report
If it's been years since you've given your credit report a good once-over, or if you never have, even figuring out where to start can be daunting. Luckily, federal law entitles you to a free copy of your credit report once every 12 months from the three major credit-reporting agencies: Equifax, Experian and TransUnion. You can get a free copy of all three bureaus' versions of your credit report at AnnualCreditReport.com.

To check your credit report every few months, order one at a time and space them out over the course of the year. If you're getting acquainted with your credit history for the first time, order all three at once. If you live in Colorado, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Jersey or Vermont, you're entitled to a second copy of each report annually, says Steve Bucci, Bankrate's Debt Adviser and author of the forthcoming book "Credit Management Kit for Dummies." Georgia residents can get three a year from each bureau.

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Spring clean your credit reportNext1 of 8
Spring clean your credit report
When you're thinking of tidying and reorganizing your linen closet or your garage, don't forget about your credit report. Your credit history is the foundation to financial stability. The information in your credit report is what scoring companies such as FICO use to generate your credit score, which governs everything from how much you pay for a loan -- or if you can get a loan at all -- to your insurance rates.
Paying attention to your credit report only when you're about to make a big purchase such as a house or a car can backfire. According to a 2004 U.S. Public Interest Research Group study, nearly 80 percent of surveyed reports had inaccuracies. If there is any issue that takes some time to sort out, that can create a headache if you're racing the clock to secure a loan. Get a head start by going over your credit report now, and check up on it periodically so you can catch and fix any issues right away.


Read more: http://www.bankrate.com/finance/credit-cards/7-steps-to-spring-clean-your-credit-report-1.aspx#ixzz3Ck20Z6Hg 
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