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Fabiana Bueno

• Engineering  - 
 
 NASA, the European Space Agency (ESA) and entrepreneurs aiming to jump-start human colonization of space see the 3D printing of large scale objects, including entire habitations, as a major enabling technology for the future of space exploration.
 
 Planetary Resources, a company hoping to make asteroid mining into a trillion dollar industry, earlier this year unveiled the world’s first 3D printed object made from bits of an asteroid.
3D printing, and additive manufacturing processes more generally, have made many advances in recent years. Just a few years ago, most 3D printing was only used for building prototypes, which would then go on to be manufactured via conventional processes. But it’s now increasingly being used for manufacturing in its own right.
Nearly two years ago, NASA even sent a 3D printer to the International Space Station with the goal of testing how the technology works in micro-gravity. While the printer resembles a Star Trek replicator, it’s not quite that sophisticated yet; the objects it can print are small prototypes for testing.
http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/crux/2016/05/17/the-first-moon-base-will-be-printed/
Space exploration has always been associated with grandiose plans, and it looks like 3D printing may finally bring the printed word to life.
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Antonio Banderas's profile photoRachelle Mcphail's profile photo
3 comments
 
+Antonio Banderas​ I just saw something on a science show the other day that we are going to colonize Mars , but we'll be colonizing with robots first and get it ready for a human life... They have been doing experiments with vegetation , and what would best grow in Mars... this is the hundred-year plan anyway to send robots plant food for human consumption and over the next hundred years keep continue to send and shut up stations and experiments on Mars until it's ready for human life pretty cool stuff
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ULg Reflexions

• Engineering  - 
 
The #urban questions that #architectural projects are constrained by are not only formal in nature. The colour of the chosen materials must also guarantee harmony between a new #construction and its #environment. The choice of #colours is constrained by regulations that are sometimes very strict, and yet these regulations depend on tools that are largely open to subjective assessment. It sometimes seems easy to decide which colours should be dominant in a given location, but how can colours be classified in accordance with quantified criteria? Luan Nguyen, a young architectural engineer at the University of Liege has laid the foundations for a standardized and objective method for characterizing the dominant color of a house, street, neighbourhood or city. Apart from compliance with regulations, a tool such as this one opens up a lot of possibilities for better understanding the extent of colour trends in an urban environment.

http://reflexions.ulg.ac.be/en/ColoursTowns

*NGUYN LN., TELLER J.,Color in the urban environment: A user-oriented protocol for chromatic characterization and the development of a parametric typology, Color Research and Application, 2016
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Vitaliy Kaurov

• Engineering  - 
 
Super-coordination of new robots "Boston Dynamics has just posted an incredible video showcasing a massively upgraded version of the ATLAS robot that they initially developed for the DARPA Robotics Challenge. While BD calls this the “next generation” of ATLAS, it looks like such an enormous technological leap forward that it’s more like a completely different species."

"A few quick notes:

At 5’9” (1.75 m) and 180 lbs (82 kg), the new ATLAS is much shorter and lighter than the previous model, which was 6’2” (1.9 m) and 345 lbs (156 kg). See family photo above for comparison.

It looks like BD decided that electric motors aren’t yet up to the task of getting a 180-pound robot to walk around, so they stuck with the more complicated (and generally messier) hydraulic system. Other legged robots do this too, and it seems like a reasonable compromise between the quiet efficiency of electricity and the power of hydraulics.

That dynamic balancing reminds us a lot of the early BigDog videos, but it’s crazy to see it running in a biped like this, because of the speed at which the limbs have to move while still supporting the upper body.

We’re not exactly sure how much autonomy it’s got going at this point. While walking outdoors, the LIDAR appears not to be spinning much of the time, which means someone is likely driving the robot. Some of the box lifting looks to be autonomous, but we’re definitely looking for some background on what’s going on behind the scenes when the robot is stacking boxes on those shelves.

It can fall over, and not only not die, but get up again by itself. There were a few layers of mats underneath the robot, and one video doesn’t reveal a whole lot about its overall robustness, but this is miles better than any other humanoid robot short of CHIMP (if you want to call CHIMP a humanoid)."

SOURCES:

IEEE spectrum:
http://spectrum.ieee.org/automaton/robotics/humanoids/next-generation-of-boston-dynamics-atlas-robot

WIRED:
http://www.wired.com/2016/02/boston-dynamics-new-robot-wicked-good-getting-bullied/
The latest ATLAS robot is by far the most advanced humanoid robot in existence
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Peter Edenist's profile photoVitaliy Kaurov's profile photo
5 comments
 
+Peter Edenist thanks for the reminder, I added some specs and references. 
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Fabiana Bueno

• Engineering  - 
 
 The device amplifies signals, which are called neural action potentials and produced by the neurons in the anterior of the brain. An algorithm separates these signals, recorded as brain spike activity, from noise and other artifacts. With each spike detected, the microchip sends a pulse of electric current to stimulate neurons in the posterior part of the brain, artificially connecting the two brain regions.
 
 
 Bioengineering News:
Ultimately, the team hopes to develop a device that rapidly and substantially improves function after brain injury in humans. There is no such commercial treatment for the 1.5 million Americans, including soldiers in Afghanistan and Iraq, who suffer traumatic brain injuries (TBI), or the nearly 800,000 stroke victims who suffer weakness or paralysis in the United States, annually.
The prosthesis, called a brain-machine-brain interface, is a closed-loop microelectronic system. It records signals from one part of the brain, processes them in real time, and then bridges the injury by stimulating a second part of the brain that had lost connectivity.
(...)The device amplifies signals, which are called neural action potentials and produced by the neurons in the anterior of the brain. An algorithm separates these signals, recorded as brain spike activity, from noise and other artifacts. With each spike detected, the microchip sends a pulse of electric current to stimulate neurons in the posterior part of the brain, artificially connecting the two brain regions.
https://bioengineer.org/neural-prosthesis-restores-behavior-brain-injury/
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Rachelle Mcphail's profile photo
 
Amazing.....
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Fabiana Bueno

• Engineering  - 
 
 ​Researchers create a polymer that can stretch to 100 times its original length — and even repair itself if punctured.
 
 Artificial muscles currently have applications in some consumer technology and robotics, but they have shortcomings compared to a real bicep, Bao said. Small holes or defects in the materials currently used to make artificial muscle can rob them of their resilience. Nor are they able to self-repair if punctured or scratched.
But this new material, in addition to being extraordinarily stretchy, has remarkable self-healing characteristics. Damaged polymers typically require a solvent or heat treatment to restore their properties, but the new material showed a remarkable ability to heal itself at room temperature, even if the damaged pieces are aged for days. Indeed, researchers found that it could self-repair at temperatures as low as negative 4 degrees Fahrenheit (-20 C), or about as cold as a commercial walk-in freezer.
The team attributes the extreme stretching and self-healing ability of their new material to some critical improvements to a type of chemical bonding process known as crosslinking. This process, which involves connecting linear chains of linked molecules in a sort of fishnet pattern, has previously yielded a tenfold stretch in polymers.
First they designed special organic molecules to attach to the short polymer strands in their crosslink to create a series of structure called ligands. These ligands joined together to form longer polymer chains – spring-like coils with inherent stretchiness
http://engineering.stanford.edu/news/super-stretchy-self-healing-material-could-lead-artificial-muscle
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Tes Clean Air Systems

• Engineering  - 
 
Moore's law is coming to an end in a literal sense, because the exponential growth in #transistor count cannot continue. But from the consumer perspective, “Moore's law simply states that user value doubles every two years”. And in that form, the law will continue as long as the industry can keep stuffing its devices with new functionality. #MooresLaw  #semiconductors
The semiconductor industry will soon abandon its pursuit of Moore's law. Now things could get a lot more interesting.
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Jack Martinelli's profile photoengelmohr2006's profile photo
2 comments
 
This is where quantum computing comes to save the day.
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Marc Razia

• Engineering  - 
 
This is something I hadn't considered. Is it possible the solution to our Environmental Problems could actually be removing carbon instead of decreasing its output?

It would seem even the possibility of this should be very exciting news.
 
This is something I hadn't considered. Is it possible the solution to our Environmental Problems could actually be removing carbon instead of decreasing its output?

It would seem even the possibility of this should be very exciting news.
For decades, most of the strategizing about how to slow down climate change has focused on cutting emissions of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases, mainly by shifting away from fossil fuels. Other proposals range from reducing meat consumption (cattle belch massive quantities of methane, a potent greenhouse gas) to curtailment of chlorofluorocarbons (compounds that both retain heat and destroy atmospheric ozone) in refrigerants and aerosol...
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Douglas Tiffany's profile photoFrançois Kneider's profile photo
4 comments
 
Whatever heater design; one can get over than 30% of electricity, by adding ; Combustible Saver Device for Thermal Power Plant , previously on cooling towers
< http://kneideren.blogspot.fr/

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