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Gary Ray R's profile photoVeronika Kotyzová's profile photoBryan DeLuca's profile photo
2 comments
 
Thanks for the reply. Here's some more on it.

The digital magazine that explores real-world applications for engineering advancements. The military and aerospace fields are bursting with technology ranging from avionics to computer developments. Get inspired by flying robots, military drones, and even a behind-the-scenes look at the Johnson Space Center.

The articles in this issue include:
■ Flying robot fires 80,000 volts at home intruders
■ From NASA's John Space Center, check out this exclusive behind-the-scenes shot of the 'Spidernaut'
■ Man arrested for using drone to try to smuggle drugs into a prison
■ SURPRISE! NASA suddenly spots huge asteroid passing between Earth and moon
■ 5 proposed military technologies that failed hilariously
■ A map of all the planes that have disappeared in the post-WWII era
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The Daily Fusion

• Engineering  - 
 
Kui Yao and co-workers from the A*STAR Institute of Materials Research and Engineering in Singapore have discovered a way to give lightweight polymer vibration harvesters a hundredfold boost in energy output—a finding that may help to eliminate manual battery recharging in microsensors and mobile devices.

Many vibration harvesters contain piezoelectric substances that create an electric voltage when mechanically bent. By fabricating piezoelectric materials into cantilevers that resemble a diving board, these devices can oscillate from ambient vibrations and generate electricity. Researchers often use piezoelectric ceramics because they impart large amounts of electrical charges; however, the brittleness of ceramics makes them unsuitable for prolonged and large vibrational movements.

Read more: http://bit.ly/1etKLo6

Original research: http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/TUFFC.2013.2786
New lightweight polymer vibration harvesters may help to eliminate manual battery recharging in microsensors and mobile devices.
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Sohail S's profile photoBrian Gauspohl's profile photo
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Questions

• Engineering  - 
 
Gear pumps are widely used in industry, for example in chocolate production. How they work? While gears rotate they separate on the intake side of the pump, creating a void and suction which is filled by fluid. The fluid is carried by the gears to the discharge side of the pump, where the meshing of the gears displaces the fluid.



Credit:
http://www.edgeroamer.com/sweethaven/mechanics/hydraulics01/default.asp?iNum=0306
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Gear_pump_animation.gif
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gear_pump
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Илья Штатный's profile photoabhishekh deshmukh's profile photoAjay Kodliwad's profile photoAsim Husanovic's profile photo
7 comments
 
thats a cool thing
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Ammy Lin

• Engineering  - 
 
What is kinetic energy? Kinetic is energy in motion. There is more kinetic energy in objects that are warmer, faster, or that has more mass. There is less kinetic energy in slower, cooler, or less-heavy objects.  There is also something called potential energy, but that's a different matter. To learn more, check out this site: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kinetic_energy
Kinetic energy doesn't seem to really fall into any categories... so I picked the closest.... please do not judge.
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Are you an innovator or technology developer? 

From now until June 17th, EDF and five oil and gas companies — Apache Corporation, BG Group, Hess Corporation, Noble Energy and Southwestern Energy — are accepting proposals from innovators and technology developers for reliable, low-cost technologies capable of continuous detection of methane emissions from the oil and gas sector. 

*What’s in it for innovators?"

The most promising innovations will receive rigorous and independent testing at Southwest Research Institute’s state-of-the-art laboratory, and based on the outcomes, will be considered for pilot purchases at facilities run by many of the participating companies.

Read more: www.edf.org/ouV
The Challenge announced today is an effort to accelerate the development and deployment of real-world solutions to a real-world problem: methane emissions from the oil and gas sector.
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TechNotification

• Engineering  - 
 
8 Unexpected Ways Technology Will Change The World By 2020

http://www.technotification.com/2014/03/8-unexpected-ways-technology-will.html
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Diane Easterling's profile photoBrian Gauspohl's profile photokareem baloch's profile photoPaweł Kabański's profile photo
4 comments
 
smart everything...
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Cadnano simplifies and enhances the process of designing three-dimensional DNA origami nanostructures

Using this opensource application, you have the ability to design your own 3 dimensional nano-structures out of DNA at home. 

"cadnano simplifies and enhances the process of designing three-dimensional DNA origami nanostructures. Through its user-friendly 2D and 3D interfaces it accelerates the creation of arbitrary designs. The embedded rules within cadnano paired with the finite element analysis performed by cando, provide relative certainty of the stability of the structures."

http://nextbigfuture.com/2014/03/cadnano-simplifies-and-enhances-process.html
http://cadnano.org/

#nanotechnology   #nanotech   #dnaorigami  +Gerd Moe-Behrens 
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parvesh mishra's profile photoEduardo Maldonado's profile photo
 
It is really interesting to develop something free and opensource like this. But if it had used an open platform, like blender, it would have been better. #b3d  
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Wireless Electricity is Here.

Thanks to Resonant Magnetic Coupling we now have wireless electricity. MIT has developed a technology that can transfer energy/electricity over long distances. They're calling it WiTricity. The way WiTricity works is this: There is a device connected to an external power source such as a wall outlet. The device then takes the electricity and converts it into an electromagnetic frequency. A device connected to the electronic needing power then takes that frequency and turns it back into electricity.

http://www.witricity.com/pages/technology.html

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Greg Bullock's profile photoWillie Bartels's profile photoArnis Kalniņš's profile photoNaveen Bhat's profile photo
3 comments
 
Isn't that utterly ineffective?
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Alexander Light

• Engineering  - 
 
Many scientists are saying Ann Makosinski’s invention could change the world. Makosinski, a Filipino-Canadian from Victoria, Canada, invented a flashlight powered by nothing more than body heat: http://humansarefree.com/2014/03/body-heat-powered-flashlight-invented.html#sthash.GgbrWPJT.dpuf
The invention has the potential to change the world Many scientists are saying Ann Makosinski’s in...
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K.Darian Lavelle's profile photoCarlo Misiak's profile photo
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SciGnosis

• Engineering  - 
 
Circuit that Dissolves in Water.

Scientist over at Beckman Institute, Tufts University and the University of Illinois have created a biodegradable circuit. “We refer to this type of technology as transient electronics,” said John A. Rogers, the Lee J. Flory-Founder Professor of Engineering at the U. of I., who led the multidisciplinary research team. This technology could be used for medical implants, environmental monitors, such as wireless sensors that are dispersed after a chemical spill, that degrade over time to eliminate any ecological impact, and also various consumer electronics.

Read more at: http://news.illinois.edu/news/12/0927transient_electronics_JohnRogers.html
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Martha Estella Zambrano Vargas's profile photoKeol Kruz's profile photoJe di's profile photoabhishekh deshmukh's profile photo
 
its made of what
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Bill Carter
owner

• Engineering  - 
 
The Axe has been reinvented!

From the inventor's website:

_VIPUKIRVES™ is an efficient tool for chopping firewood, possessing many advantages, such as speed and work safety, over traditional axes and small hydraulic log splitters. VIPUKIRVES™ separates sections from the log using a
unique lever action that allows logs with branches to be split into firewood in seconds. The splitting force of VIPUKIRVES™ is considerably stronger than with a traditional axe._

Strike and loosen!

VIPUKIRVES™ has an ingenious design. Upon striking the log, it automatically turns to the right and detaches the chopped portion from the log. VIPUKIRVES™ functions like a convention axe with the exception that the user must loosen his/her the grip on the handle when the blade strikes the log. Chopped sections are removed with a single strike and the blade doesn't become lodged in the log, but keeps it in the same place and ready for the next strike._

See http://www.vipukirves.fi/english/ for more. 
 
Basic Physics Revolutionizes the Axe

For how many centuries have we made and used axes the same way?  According to Wikipedia, the earliest axes appeared probably 1.5 million years ago.  Now, a Finnish inventor has reinvented the axe and used physics to make it much, much better.

Traditional axes require a direct transfer of momentum into a solid wedge that must overcome sliding friction to accomplish splitting of wood.  Much of the incident kinetic energy is lost due to this friction and the concomittant lateral compression of the wood in the direction of highest strength. The redsign by Finnish inventor Heikki Kärnä works instead like a lever, with a laterally displaced center of gravity and the rotational inertia providing the fulcrum about the rotational axis.  The axe inserts into the wood a short distance, and as friction slows the downward movement of the axe, the remaining momentum instead translates into a twisting motion that fractures the wood. 

In essence, more energy goes into accomplishing the fracture event that splits the wood along it's weak direction.  Less of the energy is lost into both compressing the wood in its strong direction and overcoming friction between the axe surface and the wood,  

Seen here:

http://boingboing.net/2014/04/17/eccentric-axe-uses-physics-to.html

#ScienceEveryDay   #Mechanics   #wood   #fracture   #axe  
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eric schniter's profile photoGary Ray R's profile photoBill Carter's profile photoLinda garcia's profile photo
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+Adrian Gordon 
Now its been a while since I did any chopping firewood, but I remember the process as generally using a saw to cut logs for firewood to length (bucking) and then splitting the logs with an axe. 

Any part of this process can be motorized, the above newly designed hand axe (could be called a maul) is to me the most efficient method of hand splitting the wood.  A chain saw is not used for splitting wood. But there are some really cool hydraulic ram devices that split wood very fast and efficiently.
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Airborne wind turbines hovering high in the air and tethered to the ground, like kites, have the potential to generate huge amounts of electricity, based on a recent wind availability study led by the University of Delaware.

Researchers pinpointed tracts of the atmosphere ideal for locating airborne wind energy (AWE) devices, which convert kinetic energy from wind into electricity. Findings published in the April issue of Renewable Energy ( http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.renene.2013.10.044 ) show that there are enough areas usable by airborne turbines to produce several terawatts of electric power annually—more than enough needed to meet worldwide demands.

Read more: http://bit.ly/1n72UQC
Airborne wind turbines hovering high in the air and tethered to the ground have the potential to generate huge amounts of electricity.
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Monty Belvin's profile photomerlin jones's profile photoJonathan Moon's profile photo
 
one of the best ideas ive seen yet
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For the first time, researchers have implanted an electrode that can record neural activity while it simultaneously delivers electric current to the brain.

Minneapolis-based medical device company Medtronic developed the device, which can also adjust its electrical output in response to the changing conditions of the brain. This automated control could one day improve deep brain stimulation treatment and even enable doctors to use the device to treat more conditions, experts say.

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For the first time, researchers have implanted an electrode that can record neural activity while it simultaneously delivers electric current to the brain. Minneapolis-based med...
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J Millz

• Engineering  - 
 
 
This is very exciting news. We have known about the potential of graphene for years now and the world has been racing to find a more efficient way of producing it. The article doesn't exactly state HOW or WHAT the breakthrough is, but if it's exciting enough for me to have heard of it, I'm stoked. 
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Kriti Tripathi's profile photoGreg Grzywacz's profile photoBrian Gauspohl's profile photo
 
NASA’s Super Guppy Cargo Aircraft Makes A Special Delivery!

NASA’s Super Guppy, a wide-bodied cargo aircraft, landed at the Redstone Army Airfield near Huntsville, Ala. on March 26 with a special delivery: an innovative composite rocket fuel tank.

Read More at http://goo.gl/o73Gnm
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Brian Gauspohl's profile photoGary Ray R's profile photoAllen Chen's profile photoTadeáš Vymĕtal's profile photo
4 comments
 
Oo

oooooh!

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Hi-Tech CFD

• Engineering  - 
 
Solar panels are solid-state, right? No moving parts and certainly no fluid flow - unless you count the rivers of electrons flowing in a semi-conductor. So what role is there for Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD)? 

Read More at http://goo.gl/XtiBdd
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Paul Statchen's profile photoAnna First's profile photo
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SciGnosis

• Engineering  - 
 
Mind Controlling is Here

Karl Deisseroth and his team at Stanford University have come up with a way to control the movement of mice. By exposing it's neurons to certain colors of light, you can get different reactions occur. When a light stimulated the right hemisphere of their brain, the mouse uncontrollably runs it a circle to the left.

http://singularityhub.com/2010/03/18/incredible-video-of-using-light-to-control-the-brain-of-mice/
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Julia Liebetrau's profile photoBrian Gauspohl's profile photoMajid Talebi's profile photoAlexander Turbyfield's profile photo
2 comments
 
Ok
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Boston University researchers developing more efficient solar energy systems by making them self-cleaning.

The areas of the world with the greatest solar insolation happen to be in very dusty desert areas with strained water resources, making conventional cleaning difficult for large scale solar production.  The technology being developed at Boston University eliminates this problem by relying on low power electrostatic waves to remove dust from solar mirrors and PV modules.  
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Jeremy Stark's profile photoGary Ray R's profile photo
3 comments
 
Thanks +Jeremy Stark 
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TechNotification

• Engineering  - 
 
American engineers are designing and testing more new manned spacecraft than at any other time in history. Here are 7 vehicles that will change how we work and play in space.

http://www.technotification.com/2014/03/the-ships-of-new-space-age.html
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Genaro Espinoza's profile photo
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SciGnosis

• Engineering  - 
 
According to popsci.com: "One of the worst escalator accidents in modern history occurred in 1987, when a London Underground station escalator exploded, billowing flame into the ticketing hall. Thirty-one people died. Since then, deflector brushes, emergency stop buttons and automatic sprinklers have been added to many escalators. Last year, Chan and Jack Levy, a mechanical-engineering professor at City University, unveiled a moving staircase called the Levytator that doesn't double back on itself like a conveyor belt. Instead it loops so that a single installed escalator is actually two moving stairways, up and down. In between the stairways, the Levytator levels out as a moving walkway. There doesn't have to be a landing platform, so it's safer. And, Chan says, repairs are far easier, because only a stair or two needs to be removed at a time. Regular escalators must be entirely dismantled."


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Ramya Sree's profile photoGary Ray R's profile photo
3 comments
 
super........
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