Stream

Join this community to post or comment

Vitaliy Kaurov

• General/Interdisciplinary  - 
 
Your life on earth - How you and the world have changed since you were born. A great BBC website that puts your life into a scientific perspective: 

http://www.bbc.com/earth/story/20141016-your-life-on-earth

Find out how, since the date of your birth, your life has progressed; including how many times your heart has beaten, and how far you have travelled through space. Investigate how the world around you has changed since you've been alive; from the amount the sea has risen, and the tectonic plates have moved, to the number of earthquakes and volcanoes that have erupted. Grasp the impact we've had on the planet in your lifetime; from how much fuel and food we've used to the species we've discovered and endangered. And see how the BBC was there with you, capturing some of the most amazing wonders of the natural world. Explore, enjoy, and share with your friends either the whole page, or your favourite insights. This is your story, the story of your life on earth.

DATA SOURCES:
http://www.bbc.com/earth/bespoke/your-life/docs/sources.pdf

 #life #earth #time 
79
29
Simon Lavelle's profile photoSteffy philou's profile photoMufariz Mohideen's profile photoInsha Nigar's profile photo
4 comments
 
Thanks for sharing, that's great! 1 billion heartbeats in, hoping for a couple billion more...
Add a comment...

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)

• General/Interdisciplinary  - 
 
Scientists from PNNL and several other research organizations – working at the +Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL)  at PNNL – reconstructed the first complete genomes for Archaea, a domain of single-celled microorganisms, using cultivation-independent methods, revealing these organisms play a key role in the global carbon cycle. Read more at http://www.emsl.pnnl.gov/emslweb/news/archaeal-tree-life.
 
* * *
 
Archaea, a domain of single-celled microorganisms, represent a significant fraction of the earth’s biodiversity, yet they remain much less understood than bacteria. One reason for this lack of knowledge is relatively poor genome sampling, which has limited accuracy of the Archaeal phylogenetic tree. In a recent study, researchers approximately doubled the genomic diversity sampled from this domain and reconstructed the first complete genomes for Archaea using cultivation-independent methods resulting in an extensive revision of the Archaeal tree of life.
 
Researchers from PNNL, University of California, Berkeley; The Ohio State University; Columbia University; the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Joint Genome Institute; EMSL, the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a DOE national scientific user facility at PNNL and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory used genome-resolved metagenomic analyses to investigate the diversity, genomes sizes, metabolic capacities and potential roles of Archaea in terrestrial subsurface biogeochemical cycles. They sequenced DNA in sediment and groundwater samples from a uranium-contaminated aquifer at DOE’s Integrated Field Research Challenge site near Rifle, Colo. This is a former uranium mill and the primary site for DOE’s Subsurface Systems Scientific Focus Area. RNA-Seq was conducted using the 5500XL SOLiD sequencers at EMSL.
 
By sampling genomes of 100 different Archaea, researchers identified two novel phyla—named Woesearchaeota and Pacearchaeota—within the recently proposed DPANN superphylum. The unprecedented reconstruction of two complete genomes for members of this major superphylum showed these organisms have small genomes and limited metabolic capacities. Detailed metabolic analyses of DPANN representatives revealed their primary contributions to the earth’s biogeochemical cycles involve carbon and hydrogen metabolism. Moreover, most core biosynthetic pathways were absent or incomplete in DPANN Archaea, suggesting they are symbionts or parasites that depend on other organisms for basic metabolic requirements.
 
Strikingly, the key features of DPANN Archaea closely parallel those of a putative bacterial superphylum. Their members are also predicted to have small genomes and to lack core metabolic pathways. Taken together, findings suggest these organisms depend on other members of the microbial community to survive and similar conditions have shaped two of the three major branches of the tree of life.
 
Why is this important? The study revealed Archaea in the terrestrial subsurface contribute primarily to carbon and hydrogen cycling, suggesting these organisms may be involved in processing the sizeable reservoir of buried organic carbon. This finding can be immediately implemented within genome-resolved ecosystem models to more accurately reflect the key role played by Archaea in the global carbon cycle.
23
1
Gary Ray R's profile photoEzilda Tacchi's profile photo
 
If you are like me and did not know much about Archaea, Wiki has a good write up.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Archaea

Also more information at:
Introduction to the Archaea
http://www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/archaea/archaea.html

and more at:
http://www.microbeworld.org/types-of-microbes/archaea

There is even a peer-reviewed, open access journal called Archaea:
http://www.hindawi.com/journals/archaea/
Add a comment...

Jim Sutton

• General/Interdisciplinary  - 
 
 
"What a beautiful world this will be"

Get your ticket to that wheel in space
While there's time
The fix is in
You'll be a witness to that game of chance in the sky

     - lyrics from "I.G.Y.", Donald Fagen, 1982 

The International Geophysical Year (IGY) was an international scientific collaboration that lasted from 01 July 1957 to 31 December 1958. Sixty-seven countries participated during this brief thawing of the Cold War in the years following Joseph Stalin's death in 1953.

Important occurrences during this event included Sputnik 1 becoming Earth's first successful artificial satellite, the discovery of the Van Allen radiation belts, and the confirmation of seafloor spreading that greatly supported the theory of plate tectonics.

Pictured: "This view shows the auroral curtain over the derelict launch towers of the Churchill Rocket Range. Built in 1957 for the International Geophysical Year, the Rocket Range was in use until the mid-1980s as Canada’s only launch facility. Hundreds of sounding rockets, many of them Canadian-built Black Brants, were launched from here, shooting up into the ionosphere on nights just like this to study the aurora."

(Photo/photo description:  © 2014 Alan Dyer/ +Alan Dyer, February 8, 2014, retrieved from amazingsky.net/2014/02/08/aurora-in-orion)

Donald Fagen - I.G.Y. (What a Beautiful World) (HQ) youtube.com/watch?v=sogYgHlNnqo


#aurora   #auroraborealis   #space   #science   #scienceeveryday   #igy   #donaldfagen   #internationalgeophysicalyear   #earthscience   #sky   #northernlights   #beautifulworld  
3 comments on original post
68
3
Paul Smith's profile photoyonenaga kikumoto's profile photoJános Kisspál's profile photoGayatri Ramakrishnan's profile photo
4 comments
 
spectrum
Add a comment...

Justin Chung

• General/Interdisciplinary  - 
 
A Dragon spacecraft aboard a Falcon 9 rocket left Earth today (Tue, Apr 14) loaded with research so astronauts on the International Space Station can conduct experiments. The science payloads will support experiments in biology, biotechnology, physical science and Earth science. Here's some info on the supply run and science that'll be conducted.
 
Falcon 9 Liftoff! SpaceX Dragon on Supply Run to Space Station!

A Falcon 9 rocket and Dragon spacecraft left Earth today (Tuesday, April 14) loaded with research so astronauts on the ISS (International Space Station) can conduct experiments including those that will help scientists understand human reactions on long-duration flights like those required for a journey to Mars.

At 7am EDT this Friday (April 17), the Dragon spacecraft will catch up to the orbiting laboratory where the station's robotic arm will reach out and capture it. The spacecraft is loaded with more than 2 tons of material, including items needed for 40 of the 250-plus experiments to be conducted by the station crews.

The science payloads will support experiments in biology, biotechnology, physical science and Earth science. This research improves life on Earth and drives progress for future space exploration.

Some of the experiments will focus on astronaut Scott Kelly, one of two men who recently began a year-long mission on the orbiting laboratory so they can help determine changes and possible solutions to several dilemmas posed by extended missions. This is crucial to NASA's knowledge of the effects on astronauts of missions to distant worlds.

One experiment will explore the changes in common bone cells of mice to see what changes in the cells in microgravity. Astronauts regularly loose bone mass during missions and researchers want to stop that bone density drop-off. This is also of deep interest on Earth where solutions to the problem for astronauts may also apply to people suffering from osteoporosis on Earth.

Also, scientists want to determine to amount fluid shifts in the body in weightlessness so they can figure out whether changes in astronauts' vision are related to additional pressure in the brain from fluids that gravity would otherwise force into lower body parts.

Some of the research will focus on synthetic muscle to see how it withstands radiation in low-Earth orbit. Artificial muscles could one day replace some of the metal components in robots to give them more human capabilities.

The Dragon's scientific contribution doesn't end with the delivery of the experiments and equipment. Astronauts will pack the spacecraft with used gear and unneeded packaging. Completed science experiments will also be loaded into the capsule. After about five weeks in orbit, the Dragon will separate from the station and return to Earth.

http://www.nasa.gov/content/falcon-9-roars-skyward-to-send-dragon-on-supply-run-to-station
https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2015/04/14/dragon-reaches-space-headed-for-friday-station-rendezvous

#spacex #falcon9 #dragon #isscargo #iss #crs6 #spacecraft #rocket #nasa #journeytomars #yearinspace #space #exploration #science #technology #scienceeveryday
4 comments on original post
23
3
Justin Chung's profile photoPramod Rathod's profile photoRubén RC Soto's profile photojeel katira's profile photo
6 comments
 
+Justin Chung yes obviously , and is going to provide like an infinite data flow for scientific communities all around the world ,in all science branches, and will give us a better perspective on how to solve the upcoming big social problems this kind of research and activities should be supported and encourage more , should be main priority
Add a comment...

American Scientist

• General/Interdisciplinary  - 
 
 
If you can see the pigments within skin, then why couldn't you see the pigments within a painting?

American Scientist goes 'behind-the-science' with +Duke University's  Martin Fischer and NC Museum of Art's Chief Conservator, William Brown, about using a nondestructive imaging technique to explore beneath a painting's surface.

Using laser technology called nonlinear pump-probe microscopy, Fischer and his team can study the pigments and layers to help determine, for example, the age of historic paintings. Such analysis reveals the artist’s techniques and further information about the artwork.

Traditionally, art conservators will make cross sections in paintings by cutting a very tiny section out. Brown discusses how pump-probe microscopy basically allows him to see “virtual cross-sections” of the artwork and assists him and his team in better understanding and conserving paintings at the museum.

By crossing the threshold into the art world, Fischer and his team can expand their research into new fields and assist a broader section of society in unique and scientific ways.

Read more: bit.ly/1NlHGfO

•Dr. Martin Fischer's background: www.dibs.duke.edu/research/profiles/17-martin-fischer
•NC Museum of Art: ncartmuseum.org/
•Center for Molecular and Biomolecular Imaging (Duke University): cmbi.duke.edu/
•Transcript of video: bit.ly/1DBfJKL

#Art   #Artwork   #Historicart   #Science   #lasers   #Microscopy   #technology   #Chemistry   #conservation   #history  
View original post
6
Add a comment...

SciConcilium

• General/Interdisciplinary  - 
 
Disabling Deadly Brain Cancer Genes

Searching for genes and signals responsible for cancer formation and recovery is the initial step to help treating cancer. Scientists discovered a small RNA molecule called miR-182 that could target and silence cancer-causing genes. The first challenge was identifying miR-182 as a good survival sign for patients with glioblastoma. Glioblastoma is an aggressive brain cancer type with poor prognosis. Researchers used a nanostructure called spherical nucleic acids (SNAs) on small gold nanoparticles to transpose the blood-brain barrier to reach tumor cells and deliver miR-182. The technique allows targeting the correct cells without affecting the surrounding tissues like chemotherapy does. Although the initial tests were only performed in mice scientists are optimistic. The new approach not only has the potential to treat brain cancers but other cancer types and genetic disorders.

News Source: Science Daily –http://ow.ly/Lrsf4

Research Article: Genes & Development - miR-182 integrates apoptosis, growth, and differentiation programs in glioblastoma -  http://ow.ly/LrsAk

#braincancer #cancergenes   #nanoparticles #glioblastoma  
Searching for genes and signals responsible for cancer formation and recovery is the initial step to help treating cancer. Scientists discovered a small RNA molecule called miR-182 that could target and silence cancer-causing genes. The first challenge was identifying miR-182 as a good survival sign for patients with glioblastoma. Glioblastoma is an aggressive brain cancer type with poor prognosis. Researchers used a nanostructure called spherica...
14
4
Karthick Srivatsan's profile photoN. G. Vaquera-Araujo's profile photo
Add a comment...

Peptineo

• General/Interdisciplinary  - 
 
CNN ran an article on Guatemalans being infected with STDs and studied. Kudos to the scientific community for decrying this type of research. This is an incredible story on the ethical dilemmas associated with human research. The links provide additional detail on the consequences of such research.
 
Is this science? Guatemalans infected with STDs and studied. This is part of a much darker past in our scientific history. There are other well documented cases that occurred in the US as well. Here is a link that the +CNN article should have referenced. This provides all of the key background on the study. It includes discussions on ethical considerations as well.

http://www.hhs.gov/1946inoculationstudy/index.html

The following is a key link to scientific literature decrying the study and the results it obtained. Kudos to the scientific community for bringing real focus to this tragic program.

http://jama.jamanetwork.com/Mobile/article.aspx?articleid=186859
A lawsuit alleges Johns Hopkins University and the Rockefeller Foundation helped conduct a study in which Guatemalans were deliberately infected with STDs.
7 comments on original post
9
1
Peptineo's profile photoRajini Rao's profile photoKaren M's profile photo
5 comments
 
+Peptineo in particular, I appreciated the link to the JAMA article. Thanks.
Add a comment...

Intellects

• General/Interdisciplinary  - 
 
What Smoking Does to an unborn baby?

#ultrasound #smoking #nervousystem

Originally Shared by +SciConcilium 
 
What Smoking Does to an unborn baby?

Smoking kills, slowly but surely, but it can potentially change whole life of unborn kid. Ultrasound 4D scans show delayed development of central nervous system in fetus born to smoking moms. How does that affects child life in long term is still a  open question.
"After studying their scans at 24, 28, 32 and 36 weeks,  foetuses whose mothers smoked continued to show significantly higher rates of mouth movement and self-touching than those carried by non-smokers."

Original Study: Acta Paediatrica http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/apa.13001/abstract
Source: DailyMail http://ow.ly/KJp1g 

#ultrasound4d #fetusgrowth #smoking 
View original post
13
2
Philip Andrew's profile photoManuel Hermann's profile photoSilvia Rodriguez's profile photo
 
I am amazed people still smoke
Add a comment...

American Scientist

• General/Interdisciplinary  - 
 
 
Marie Curie was a well-known physicist and chemist who did pioneering research on radioactivity. She also won two Nobel Prizes where she was the first woman to win one as well as the first person and only woman to win it twice! Alongside all of her work in research and making strides in the scientific world, she was also a mother. 

How does having children potentially affect a woman's career in science, technology, math and engineering fields? Read one of our most popular articles, "When Scientists Choose Motherhood" by Wendy M. Williams and Stephen J. Ceci: http://www.amsci.org/issues/pub/when-scientists-choose-motherhood

#womenshistorymonth   #womenintech   #Womeninscience   #History   #Science   #motherhood   #children  
View original post
35
4
Mathieu Hautefeuille's profile photoLaura Golin's profile photoPriscila Araújo's profile photoPedro Mc Cumber Chapa's profile photo
 
Curie married twice. Thats enough!
Add a comment...

SciConcilium

• General/Interdisciplinary  - 
 
US cancer drugs lobby and solutions revealed

The high prices of the cancer drugs are affecting the way patients are treated. Doctors from the Mayo Clinic Cancer Center indicated American patients pay 50 to 100 percent more for the same patented drug than patients in other countries. It is not clear the reasons to calculate the drugs high prices. Despite the obvious cancer research costs, people do not understand drugs are not operating under a free market economy. Different cancer drugs must be used in combination. Therefore, there isn’t a real competition defining the prices. Among the various recommendations, doctors proposed new drug price negotiation methods, allow FDA recommending the drug prices, permit the importation of drugs for personal use or allow Medicare to negotiate drug prices.

Source: EurekAlert - http://ow.ly/KqBY1
Original Study: Mayo Clinic Proceedings - Oncologists Reveal Reasons for High Cost of Cancer Drugs in the US, Recommend Solutions - http://ow.ly/KxDaE

‪#‎oncology‬ ‪#‎cancer‬ ‪#‎drugs‬ ‪#‎price‬ ‪#‎lobby‬ ‪#‎cartel‬ ‪#‎FDA‬ ‪#‎Medicare‬
7
Add a comment...

American Scientist

• General/Interdisciplinary  - 
 
 
BLOG: "We discuss one such issue here, because it is interesting in its own right and because numerous commentators have raised it in an attempt to erroneously dismiss our findings. We refer to the use of gendered personalities to disguise the central purpose of the experiments."

Read the full post, "Describing Applicants in Gendered Language Might Influence Academic Science Hiring," by Wendy M. Williams and Stephen J. Ceci: bit.ly/1KmCVgi 

#WomeninScience   #Science   #WomeninSTEM   #Blog   #research   #socialissues   #careers   #Gender  
View original post
16
1
Elizabeth McFife's profile photo‫احمد شریف پور‬‎'s profile photo
5 comments
 
Perhaps. 
Add a comment...

Joe Kulangara

• General/Interdisciplinary  - 
 
A device developed by +NASA and DHS was used to rescue 4 men trapped under earthquake debris in Nepal. From the article:
"The device called FINDER (Finding Individuals for Disaster and Emergency Response) uses microwave-radar technology to detect heartbeats of victims trapped in wreckage. Following the April 25 earthquake in Nepal, two prototype FINDER devices were deployed to support search and rescue teams in the stricken areas."

There isn't a lot of detail about how the devices were used in the field to find these four men. However, it's good to see that some of the enormous resources allocated to the US DHS is being used to build and deploy tools like this. Additional information about FINDER can be found here: Detecting Heartbeats in Rubble: DHS and NASA Team up to Save Victims of Disasters http://goo.gl/gEGU4z
Four men trapped under up to 10 feet of bricks, mud and other debris have been rescued in Nepal thanks to new search-and-rescue technology developed in partnership by the Department of Homeland Security's Science and Technology Directorate and JPL.
17
6
‫احمد شریف پور‬‎'s profile photoHelen Yan's profile photo
Add a comment...

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)

• General/Interdisciplinary  - 
 
Liquid fuels from fossil-based resources are the backbone of the transportation industry. What if we could create these fuels from biomass – plant and waste sources? Researchers at PNNL have been experimenting with this possibility for decades, and have now advanced their capabilities to the large-scale. Read more at http://energyenvironment.pnnl.gov/highlights/highlight.asp?sector=0&id=1753.
 
* * *
 
In mid-January 2015, they successfully demonstrated part of the biomass fuel creation process using a 14-foot distillation column located in PNNL’s Process Development Laboratory-West (PDL-West) building. The system, funded by DOE's Bioenergy Technologies Office(Offsite link) (BETO), separates upgraded bio-oil into gasoline, diesel, and jet range fuels. The distillation column start-up consisted of a test run, where two cuts were collected from the upgraded bio-oil, producing approximately 10 liter quantities of gasoline and diesel/jet range fuels. These results demonstrated that usable fractions of gasoline and diesel/jet range fuels can be generated on a large-scale level.
 
The distillation process represents the last step in producing fuels from pyrolysis, which uses flash heating to turn plant matter into a bio-oil. The next step is to use a catalyst to chemically remove oxygen from the liquid to turn it into a hydrocarbon, or "hydrotreated bio-oil", which can then be separated into the fuel fractions by distillation.
 
Like the large-scale distillation, the catalytic part of the process will move to a large-scale system when PNNL researchers complete the start-up of the hydrotreater, co-located in PDL-West. Together, these two systems will be able to produce the quantities necessary for fuel qualification, bringing the technology one step closer to commercialization. Successfully moving this technology to market will improve the domestic fuel supply and reduce America's dependence on foreign oil, while also introducing a new and much needed fuel supply to the transportation industry.
 
To learn more about work in this area, watch our video at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qOMXJsl7SA0.
23
2
Vito Enzo Salatino's profile photoNagaraj Shankarnarayan's profile photoRosa Márcia Antonio's profile photoRuy Castro's profile photo
4 comments
 
Water could be disintegrated into its parent elements and hydrogen could be used for the internal combustion engines.
Add a comment...

SciConcilium

• General/Interdisciplinary  - 
 
Re-Engineering Photosynthesis using Nanowire-Bacteria System

The survival of human race is totally based on process of photosynthesis. In nature every leaf is a tiny oxygen producing unit. With increasing urbanization it is almost essential that we must come up with alternative ways to produce clean oxygen. Scientists may have just found a solution to that. Researchers at University of California Berkeley have recreated the process of photosynthesis using semiconductor nanowire –bacteria system

Original Study: Nano Letter http://ow.ly/LQQoR

#photosynthesis #nanotechnology #nanowirebacteriasystem  
Researchers have recreated the process of photosynthesis using semiconductor nanowire–bacteria system with efficiency comparable to natural photosynthesis
31
6
Alexander Jacks's profile photoHanna T's profile photoFabrizio Omarini's profile photoPedro Mc Cumber Chapa's profile photo
 
And THE SOONER - THE 'WAY' BETTER!!!!! 😊
Add a comment...

Arran Frood

• General/Interdisciplinary  - 
 
Enjoy the SpaceX Falcon launch to the International Space Station? Ok, so the stage 1 recovery didn't quite make it, but here's a 2min video on an experiment the SpaceX's Dragon capsule is right now taking up to the ISS. 

It's an experiment to see how bone cells grow in space, using a unique 3D cell culturing system, led by Paola Divieti-Pajevic of Massachusetts General Hospital Research. They have developed bioreactors for which will be running up in space and here on Earth too -- comparisons could allow microgravity experiments to run here too (the reactors spin to recreate microgravity).

The research could help us understand how astronauts on long missions could cope with bone loss, as well as other aspects of the fundamental biology of cell functioning and cell signalling. 

There's more in this earlier feature: http://www.bbsrc.ac.uk/news/research-technologies/2014/140128-f-3d-cell-culture-set-for-space/

And on the NASA mission page:
http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/research/divieti.html

And the funders (National Institutes of Health) have more links here: http://www.niams.nih.gov/News_and_Events/NIH_NASA_Activities/

 
24
5
Patrick C's profile photoJAYANT GANGULY's profile photoabak hoben's profile photoVikram K's profile photo
2 comments
 
Thanks for this!
Add a comment...

SciConcilium

• General/Interdisciplinary  - 
 
Conditions for Life are Common in the Universe [Video]

While scientists keep looking for life on Mars, Jupiter or Saturn, the whole universe is out there. Researchers believed conditions for life are almost unique and rare. However, astronomers using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) discovered complex organic molecules in a disk of gas and dust surrounding an alien star. The star MWC 480 system contains the ingredients required for life to evolve, and the discovery suggests life may exist throughout the universe. The chemistry required to build organic molecules is present on a large scale. European Southern Observatory (ESO) observatory scientists say the protoplanetary disc around a constellation of Taurus star, named MWC 480, harbors enough methyl cyanide (CH3CN) to "fill all of Earth’s oceans”.


Research Article: Nature -http://ow.ly/LAhq0
ALMA - http://ow.ly/LArjk

#‎life‬ ‪#‎universe‬ ‪#‎star‬ ‪#‎MWC480‬ ‪#‎organicmolecules‬ ‪#‎methylcyanide‬ ‪#‎ESO‬ ‪#‎EuropeanSouthernObservatory‬ ‪#‎ALMA‬
The star MWC 480 system contains the ingredients required for life to evolve, and the discovery suggests life may exist throughout the universe. The chemistry required to build organic molecules is present on a large scale. European Southern Observatory (ESO) observatory scientists say the protoplanetary disc around a constellation of Taurus star, named MWC 480, harbors enough methyl cyanide (CH3CN) to "fill all of Earth’s oceans”. Scientists wil...
16
2
Byron Bradford's profile photojeel katira's profile photo
Add a comment...

SciConcilium

• General/Interdisciplinary  - 
 
Understanding Pain through “Wasabi Receptor”

No one likes to be in pain, but pain is the essential alert system of our body to let us know something is wrong. Too much of nothing is good particularly too much of pain. Pain is sensed through sensory nervous system but how pain is translated from chemical or mechanical stimulus to electric impulse is a complex method. Studies have shown that TRPA1 also known as “Wasabi Receptor” is important receptor to make the transition of chemical signal to electrical pulse for brain to sense. Latest study published in Nature shows 3D structure of the receptor using X-ray crystallography and has pinpointed the binding site of the receptor. Studying the complete structure of pain receptor will help scientist develop more efficient painkiller. 

Source: University of California http://goo.gl/sVk0dh
Original Paper: Nature http://goo.gl/m80YSO

#wasabireceptor   #painreceptor   #sushi  
No one likes to be in pain, but pain is the essential alert system of our body to let us know something is wrong. Too much of nothing is good particularly too much of pain. Pain is sensed through sensory nervous system but how pain is translated from chemical or mechanical stimulus to electric impulse is a complex method
5
1
Shanjith Raja's profile photolaushya senthil kumar's profile photo
 
I Have a doubt..........
Actually how painkiller Stop us from feeling pain....?
Like turning off the Receptors....or open the Circuit to stop electrical pulse....!!?
Add a comment...

SciConcilium

• General/Interdisciplinary  - 
 
Light Up Fabric Could Make Glowing Clothing an Everyday Reality

Huishing Peng and his team at Fundan University in Shanghai are working on clothing which contain 1mm thin fibers that are made from polymer light emitting electrochemical cells for clothing. These function like the LEDs found in TVs; however, they are much more elastic making them suitable for everyday wear. The semiconductors are made from ultrathin steel wire which are dipped in zinc nano particles. These are then synthesized and wrapped in a transparent coat of carbon nano tubes. Once they soften they are woven together with other materials like cotton. These fibers require less power than LEDs thus making them plug free and be powered by solar energy. Get ready for a new age of clothing!

Original Study: Nature Photonics http://www.nature.com/…/jour…/v9/n4/abs/nphoton.2015.37.html

Source: http://ow.ly/LbJ7P
‪#‎clothes‬ ‪#‎light‬ ‪#‎led‬
58
22
Karthik G Vaidya's profile photoElaine Grace's profile photoRosa Márcia Antonio's profile photoKaren Cecil's profile photo
10 comments
 
+Olivier de Broqueville yeah! u right it's pollution... .
Add a comment...

SciConcilium

• General/Interdisciplinary  - 
 
Curing Breast Cancer by combining Biology and Mathematics

With recent innovative methods the detection of tumors related to breast cancer can be calculated via mathematical modelisation and experimentation with only 20 test as opposed to the previous 596. This study was conducted by Dr.Marie Doucey an oncology researcher along with Professor Xenarios and Professor Delaloye in France. Monocytes are immune cells that are present in the blood and therefore they can be found in tumors. They lead to the development of tumor blood vessels and surpass the immune response to get rid of the tumor. The study showed that once blood monocytes are present in the tumor, they increase their angiogenic and immunosuppressive activity. The main objective of the trial was to prevent the monocytes from developing. By creating a Boolean model of the monocyte behavior –researchers were able to determine which treatments would be able to suppress the monocyte activities. Modelisation allows researchers to frame the pathway and the best method to address and suppress the monocytes in a way like never before. The primary results showed that tumoral monocytes represent new treatment targets and thus could possibly lead to advancement in treating breast cancer.

Original Study: PLOS Computational Biology http://journals.plos.org/ploscompbiol/article
Source: Eurekalert http://ow.ly/KUnmX

‪#‎breastcancer‬ ‪#‎cures‬ ‪#‎newtreatments‬
12
11
Petter Lauritz Sand's profile photomd zahurul's profile photoScientia Medicina's profile photosyarifah syahidah's profile photo
2 comments
 
Thanks
Add a comment...

SciConcilium

• General/Interdisciplinary  - 
 
New screen delivers real-time holograms

Most people don't realize, but holography dates from 1947. It was such an important discovery the scientist and inventor, Denis Gabor, was awarded the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1971. Overcoming technical limitations, researchers in the UK developed a new display able to make real-time holograms reality. Scientists used nanostructures that act as antennae in the display which can be operated using streams of liquid crystals. The new technology takes advantage of how light interacts with the electrons that float freely around in metal materials, a phenomenon known as plasmonics. Although it’s not possible to use this in videoconferences yet, it is possible to make holograms of recorded images quickly.

Source: Science alert - http://ow.ly/KrP8v
Original Study: Physica Status Solidi - Engineered pixels using active plasmonic holograms with liquid crystals - http://ow.ly/KEbYW

‪#‎holograms‬ ‪#‎liquidcrystals‬ ‪#‎light‬ ‪#‎plasmonics‬ ‪#‎sciencefiction‬
36
8
Matthew Gordon's profile photoJoshua Ledden's profile photoJason Tepper's profile photoPedro Mc Cumber Chapa's profile photo
 
Engineering!
Add a comment...