Stream

Matt Sundquist

Discussion  - 
 
How you can make and embed interactive 3D graphs and maps with R, Python, and MATLAB. 
Showing a third dimension on a flat computer screen is usually hard. Plotly’s interactive 3D graphing changes that. You can zoom, toggle, pan, rotate, spin, see data on the hover, and more. In this post we’ll make 3D graphs with our APIs for Python, R, MATLAB, and Excel. Check out the links, our documentation or our tutorials to learn more and start embedding your plots. If you want to use Plotly on-premise with your team, contact us to start a ...
7
3
Edoardo Rosa's profile photoLoick PELET's profile photo
Add a comment...

gurdeep saini

Discussion  - 
 
IMPLEMENTING STACKS WITH CLASSES
 
**
IMPLEMENTING STACKS WITH CLASSES #Recently in one of our classes i read this topic and finds it good one.   #hope u will like it class stack:     s=[]     def push(self):         a=input("Enter any number :")         stack.s.append(a)         def display(se...
View original post
4
1
dennis durling's profile photogurdeep saini's profile photo
7 comments
 
Mad beginners like u will do crappy programming. lol
Add a comment...

Kdp Mabby

Discussion  - 
 
Thanks for accepting me as a member in this groups...
1
Add a comment...

James Angelo

Discussion  - 
 
On one of my machines, the results of my programs do not appear in the terminal. I'm using Ubuntu 14.04 LTS. I created a directory named Exercises on the Desktop. From the terminal, I cd'ed into Exercises. Inside Exercises, I created a file named Practice.py using Vim and wrote some code. I saved the file in Vim with the command :wq. I typed python Practice.py in the terminal to run the program. There were no runtime errors. However, I'm not seeing the results of the program. The same exact program ran without any issues on this other Ubuntu machine that I have. The program also runs fine on online interpreters. I reinstalled Python 2.x and 3.x on the machine, but the problem persisted. Does anyone know how to fix that? Or, can someone point me to a solution? 
2
1
Robert Grant's profile photoJames Angelo's profile photoJoseph Dung's profile photo
20 comments
 
+Robert Grant , to err is human, to debug is programming. Lol. I'll definitely perfom a diff on both versions. Thanks for your help!
Add a comment...

Andre Müller

Discussion  - 
 
Playing around in Python with generators, decorators, closures and functools. It's good to get a llittle bit deeper into functional programing. An article about pipelines in Python inspired me. Thanks to rauchc.
Motivation Most developers have to write programs that read and process items of stuff. Be it products, feed-items, images, you name it. I’ve certainly had to. Apprentice programmers would just write it all down sequentially, but – as many fellow programmers can testify – this approach leads to maintenance problems due to a mixing of …
18
1
Kirill Palamartchouk's profile photo
Add a comment...

Guido Stepken

Discussion  - 
 
Did somebody notice?

PYPY JIT engine speed, written in Python (RPython, a subset), has massively improved! Works on ARM, INTEL.

Have fun!
14
3
Andre Müller's profile photoAlexandre Doyer's profile photoJavier Colmenero's profile photoAlex Liberzon's profile photo
2 comments
 
I've used pypy for a serial connection to get data from a radar transceiver and send this stream over websocktes to the clients. It works with lesser workload as with CPython on Raspberry Pi (ARM).
Add a comment...

Josué Kouka

Discussion  - 
 
Hello guys,
Could you tell me why this regex isn't working 

https://gist.github.com/josuebrunel/f7f8f64bd48526ecdcbc

while it works here https://regex101.com/r/rD1hI9/1

Thanks in advance
3
Josué Kouka's profile photoTom Hallam's profile photo
13 comments
 
I'd have expected you to need '\?' so the '?' is not interpreted as a regex special character (single occurrence of previous character)
Add a comment...

John Philip

Discussion  - 
 
Look's like this is the summer of cheat sheets to work damn hard and fast.
Here's a cheat sheet to perform exploratory data analysis in Python  
43
19
Victor Rajewski's profile photoSujit Deokar's profile photoGiulio Renzi's profile photoOpen Data Science's profile photo
 
Thanks for sharing 
Add a comment...

Sumeet Sharma

Discussion  - 
 
Learn Python, Ruby & PHP w/ 8 Courses of 95 + Hours of Programming Bootcamp
http://goo.gl/BHaKX9
Pay What You Want: Back-End Developer Bundle. Learn Python, Ruby & PHP w/ 8 Courses of 95 + Hours of Programming Bootcamp
15
2
Andre Müller's profile photoMahendranath Reddy's profile photo
Add a comment...

kumar shubham

Discussion  - 
Python Programming 3 Pattern Printing . This video demonstrate about pattern Printing using python. This video will help you to learn python. By Hackaholic
6
Add a comment...

Jesse Williams

Discussion  - 
 
Here's a link to  a zero-configuration Python GAE hack factory. Perfect for trying new things without worrying about breaking the environment. 
https://codenvy.com/f?id=6gfh88aqvlcbe279 
7
Kimi Nomaka's profile photo
 
just codenvy.com
Add a comment...

Johannes Self

Discussion  - 
 
Testing pictures is fun!
Have fun!
pytest-mpl - A pytest plugin to faciliate image comparison for Matplotlib figures
6
1
Alex Liberzon's profile photo
Add a comment...

Eyitope Adelowo

Discussion  - 
 
I think of programming as being abstract. I ask myself: what exactly are zeros and ones? It's just electrons flowing through circuits, and can't really picture exactly what is going on. It is said that the computer processes. How? We know it send output. How? We know it shuts down? How. These things don't happen on the physical level (saying "it does..." isn't enough details). Even the "data is sent" is still current flowing to a place. So what exactly is data then?.

A thought: so if I was an electron, what would be my path once a computer is turned on?
4
Eyitope Adelowo's profile photojean-yves Viala's profile photo
21 comments
 
Yes but yu can find it in english yu have too : FEYNMAN lecture on computation
Add a comment...

iclou dthemes

Discussion  - 
 
Quick question..
I have been thinking about python and mysql.

Is it as efficient as php and mysql?

Talking only about Mysql
2
1
Sergey Tsaplin's profile photoDylan McNamee's profile photoTodd Thomas's profile photo
8 comments
 
+Sergey Tsaplin agreed - SQLite's best for single connection applications. The OP didn't specify the application context, so I thought I'd throw it out there.
Add a comment...

Jacob Zimmerman

Discussion  - 
 
We see how the template pattern, as well an template-like patterns make it difficult to use composition instead of inheritance and how we can get around these problems.

https://programmingideaswithjake.wordpress.com/2015/06/20/the-clash-of-template-and-delegate-patterns/
4
1
Chris Lyon's profile photoDonovan Baarda's profile photoLuca Cavazzana's profile photo
10 comments
 
+Jacob Zimmerman "prefer composition over inheritance" is because in most cases composition is the better solution. However, in some cases, inheritance is better, and IMHO the patterns you have done so far are not only examples of when inheritance is better, but actually re-implement limited forms of inheritance.

Your delegate decorator "automatically filling in 'non-overridden' methods" re-implements inheritance without virtual methods. This has the limitations you identify in this article, that you fix by crudely making a virtual method in the base class that you call a "strategy". If you made all the methods in the base class different callable "strategy"s, then congratulations, you will have re-implemented a virtual method table. Inheritance is just composition made less verbose. Note your strategy solution undermines the biggest benefit of the delegate pattern; you can wrap an existing object instance when you don't have control over how it was created (ie, an object returned by some other library that you can't easily modify).

I agree that using inheritance where composition would be better is a common mistake. However using composition where inheritance would be better is also a mistake.

Most people learn inheritance badly. It doesn't help that most popular languages implement it badly (broken multiple inheritance, not enforcing polymorphism, etc). IMHO if you didn't learn inheritance from Eiffel (or maybe Oberon for exposure to under-the-hood implementation details), you mostly learned it wrong, and probably missed some really important concepts.

The combination of bad language support, bad education, and abstraction pain debugging the resulting bad inheritance hierarchies seems to have started a major backlash against inheritance. IMHO it's now going too far, and inheritance is being avoided even when it really is the best solution.
Add a comment...

Chris Parbey

Discussion  - 
 
Cool video of a programmer coding What's Playing on Rdio in Python.  App works with the Rdio API to get what song is playing on Rdio and write to a file. Repo code available on his profile
www.livecoding.tv/video/whats-playing-on-rdio-in-python
8
1
Tanim Islam's profile photoSamuel Tom's profile photo
 
broken
Add a comment...

Robert Thorpe

Discussion  - 
 
Hi all,

Here´s a great collection of 260+ Python tools & resources all in one place, enjoy :)

http://bit.ly/1dXM0lZ

You can also contribute to the page by clicking on the ¨+¨ icons.
57
17
DzgoevGT's profile photomaneesha sane's profile photomercooreal's profile photoFroilan Irizarry's profile photo
3 comments
Add a comment...

David Blume

Discussion  - 
 
The sample code I share in http://david.dlma.com/blog/ways-to-break-a-dollar-into-change is all in #python. What I didn't state at the end, was that the optimal ordering of denominations in the first call results in fewer than 400 calls, while the worst ordering of denominations results in more than 20,000 calls.

So even though you can provide an unordered container, it doesn't mean you should.
4
Add a comment...

Jacob Zimmerman

Discussion  - 
 
I explore a new possible way of designing with the Strategy Pattern for a specific type of situation.

https://programmingideaswithjake.wordpress.com/2015/06/06/strategy-pattern-sans-objects-and-functions/
5
Andre Amorim's profile photoJames Wilson's profile photo
2 comments
 
Interesting.
Add a comment...

Uche Eke

Discussion  - 
 
A brief overview of the Mean Shift Clustering algorithm (with Python)
An overview of mean shift clustering (one of my favorite algorithms) and some of its strengths and weaknesses.
21
7
david moloney's profile photoKirill Palamartchouk's profile photo
Add a comment...