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Some asshole moderator banned me from the other Python programming community controlled by +Marty Glaubitz +David Saldaña because I said I thought Google App Engine is crap, which I still think it is.   Considering I've used it for production websites I believe I have the right and experience to express my dismay.  Personally Linode and managing my own VPS blows away a cloud solution.   Anyways it's ridiculous a few idiots who are the first to start a Python group on Google+ can control the direction of the #python  community.  
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Gergely Polonkai's profile photoMike Hibbert's profile photo
6 comments
 
+Mike Hibbert well, just look at the profile picture of the two guys mentioned by OP ;)

Anyways, I'm a user of GAE, and I can't tell anything bad about it. Don't like => don't use.
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I'd like to share some of my articles if you don't mind. My favorite one would be "Diving deep into Python - the not-so-obvious language parts". The writing process was really fun and I really learned a lot new interesting things about Python!

http://sebastianraschka.com/Articles/2014_deep_python.html
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Bernie Ongewe's profile photoSebastian Raschka's profile photojiannis bonatakis's profile photoJuancarlo Añez's profile photo
2 comments
 
Thanks for the comment. Yes, I was just going with the reference implementation of Python here since that's what most people use. Do you know by chance which particular things are CPython-unique?
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Sql Burn

Discussion  - 
 
If this article is correct, it is something we all need to think about.
The Python community should fork Python 2.
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Mike Hibbert's profile photoAnimesh Shaw's profile photoCarlos Catucci's profile photoJose A Munoz Mata's profile photo
14 comments
 
I have to say that I prefer Python 3.x, however I also have nothing against Python 2.7.x. I wouldn't say that either of them is generally superior/better, it just depends on your particular project, and one version might work better in particular applications...
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hi everyone,
any tutorials about facebook, twitter and Google plus apps
I mean if I have fb app which has some users how can I use Python to post, like and share on behalf of them
I found module for this but can't find tutorials for it
actually I found many modules but still the same problem exist " How to get user access token" I mean if I have fb app which is has 1000 users registered in it , how to post on behalf of them
I found fb, facepy, facebook-sdk and others , with fb module I could post on behalf of my account but it was using Graph Api Explorer but not my app
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Andrew Delso's profile photojiannis bonatakis's profile photo
5 comments
 
Oreilly has a good book about data mining the social media sites using python. Most of it will be done through the API I assume; however, I am only a novice programmer, so I don't know for sure.  Best of luck!
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Robert Lu

Discussion  - 
 
PyCharm 3.1.2 and Python 3.4.0 cannot work in debug mode.
Any solution is welcome! Thanks!
http://youtrack.jetbrains.com/issue/PY-12317
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Robert Lu's profile photoIvan Anishchuk's profile photo
2 comments
 
+Ivan Anishchuk Not really, PyCharm 3.13 solve it.
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Hello! 

I'm trying to solve  this problem for the past 2 weeks, so if you can, please advise me solution.
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Zhanat Suleimenov's profile photoAlberto Curro's profile photo
4 comments
 
+Zhanat Suleimenov From the logs, it's unclear wether this is a 500 coming from your remote server, or a 500 generated by suds itself.

I'd recommend that, instead using the url as string, you create a URI object, and use it as such. You can also check if the request is being sent to the server using wireshark, by listening to the output interface.
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Happy #PiDay! Wondering how it's calculated? Check out my Pi in Python series which gets up to 100 million digits!  It starts easy with Gregory's Series, moves through Archimedes and Machin and arrives at Chudnovsky where it calculates 100 million digits in 10 minutes.
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hi, I added python cross reference search into www.xrefs.info from Python version 2.0.1 to 3.4.0rc2.

http://www.xrefs.info is made for open source community in
the hope of making open source developers more productive.
The site hosts many open source code projects' cross references based
on OpenGrok, which is a very fast cross reference tool, and easy to use.

To access, you can go to http://www.xrefs.info, select a project, pick a version.
If you want to search the definition of a function,
simply type it in the definition box; If you want to do a full search,
type your text in the first box; If you want to search a file, simply
type file name in file path box. Hit search button, That's it!

The site covers following:
 - Linux kernel cross reference: from verion 0.01 - latest release, plus nightly linus' tree latest.
 - Linux boot loaders cross reference: u-boot, lilo, grub, syslinux,plus nightly latest.
 - Linux user space core packages cross reference
 - Android various releases cross reference, plus nightly latest.
 - Cloud computing other projects:
    - xen hypervisor cross reference
    - VirtualBox cross reference;
    - OpenStack cross reference
    - cloudStack cross reference.
    - Puppet cross reference
    - Salt cross reference
    - Cloud Foundary cross reference
    - OpenShift cross reference
    - Chef cross reference
    - Juju cross reference
 - Big data project Hadoop cross reference
 - BSD: FreeBSD cross reference, NetBSD cross reference, DragonflyBSD cross reference
 - Database: MySQL cross reference, MariaDB cross reference, mongoDB cross reference, redis, neo4j, hbase, cassandra
 - Python web framework: Django, web2py, Grok, TurbGear, Flask...
 - Languages: OpenJDK cross reference, Perl cross reference, Python cross reference, PHP cross reference.

If you have any questions, comments or suggestions for the site,
please let me know.

Thanks.
xrefs.info@gmail.com
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Jukka Tamminen

Discussion  - 
 
I am wondering what @ sign means in Python code?

Here is an extraction from a persistence package :

@implementer(IPersistent)
class Persistent(object):
    """ Pure Python implmentation of Persistent base class
    """
    _slots_ = ('__jar', '__oid', '__serial', '__flags', '__size')

    def _new_(cls, *args, **kw):
        inst = super(Persistent, cls).__new__(cls)
        inst.__jar = None
        inst.__oid = None
        inst.__serial = None
        inst.__flags = None
        inst.__size = 0
        return inst
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Yun Zhou's profile photobahadir cambel's profile photoDaniel Macht's profile photo
8 comments
 
Welcome then! happy #Python coding!
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What's your editor of choice for Python development, I use Sublime Text 3?
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Michael Bernstein's profile photoAhmer Khan's profile photo
64 comments
 
+Andreas Jung when people are suggesting you ignore the thread, what they really mean is that you can 'mute' it so notifications stop popping up for you.
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The key differences between Python 2.7.x and Python 3.x with examples

http://sebastianraschka.com/Articles/2014_python_2_3_key_diff.html
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Melodie Hardwick's profile photojiannis bonatakis's profile photoJuancarlo Añez's profile photoSergey Tsaplin's profile photo
2 comments
 
I have written this as IPython initially - last month or so: i am afraid but I think this was what kindled all the Python 2 vs. 3 discussions and blog posts recently :)
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I want to say Hi! to this community, and thanks for letting me having part in some hopefully awesome discussions about all the interesting topics around Python!

To introduce myself: I am a computational biologist at Michigan State University who appreciates using Python day in and out. It's become my favorite language of choice because it makes research very very productive. I started initially with C and C++, but now, I do 90% in Python, and use Cython, Numba, or parakeet if speed is an issue.
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Arthur Zubarev's profile photoSebastian Raschka's profile photo
4 comments
 
Will do, just need to find the time :)
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Hey everyone,

has somebody of you worked with Quickly(https://wiki.ubuntu.com/Quickly) and could share some of his experience? Would be cool :) THX!
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Ljubisa Gavrilovic's profile photoDaniel Hauck's profile photo
5 comments
 
Tried this. Very nice! & Useful.

I forgot that I originally seen this post here, before trying Quickly (moved link around - on multiple computers). Then, I installed Ubuntu at home cause I got some hardware and finally I could try it. And I am very happy I did.

What I like about this is that offers/incorporates whole cycle of actions:
- conception
- skeleton
- design
- coding (Python)
- code versioning
and
- deployment!

It lacks only one thing that could 'easily' produced in itself - a some sort of 'ide' or maybe better a 'launcher' that would aid using it without command line.

That may as well be an exercise :)

There is room to improve on tutorial (initial example is a bit too complex and it does not cover simpler things - people may be unfamiliar with GTK). Maybe tutorial can be extended at the beginning with couple of simpler - more basic - example applications (a text field, a button, a new window with the result for example)
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Tim Jabaut

Discussion  - 
 
So here is what may seem to be a silly question, but if I deploy a Python script that contains a lot of modules, how will the end user handle the installation of said modules? Is there a way to package them together?
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Amit Khomane's profile photoTim Ottinger's profile photo
8 comments
 
py2exe on windows, Freeze on Linux, and py2app on Mac. Also try PyInstaller 
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Ernesto Crespo's profile photoMichael Shaughnessy's profile photoJose A Munoz Mata's profile photoLandon Jurgens's profile photo
2 comments
 
R is not standing still either.  There are very clever and powerful packages for R for making it instantly useful in nearly every area of data science, most notably in the arena of Big Data.
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Simon Harms

Discussion  - 
 
My simple but effective Math Hacks. Here to save you time.
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ROSNI K V

Discussion  - 
 
Is there any way to sort a dictionary of lists using its values ,other than key ??
For eg: i have list with values :
{ 'ty2.png:' :  ['-',  'ty2.png:' , '0.7578404' ] ,  'ty3.png: ' : [ '-', 'ty3.png:' , '0.6555947'],...........................}

from this i have to sort the list using the numbers in it, So is there any way to do the same ??
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James Mills's profile photoMike Owens's profile photoBrad Montgomery's profile photo
5 comments
 
There's ordered dict and named tuple that will retain the key order.
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Marsen Wang

Discussion  - 
 
I want to do some screen recording automately with python.For example i want to record the entire web test by seleniem and then store the video or swf.Is there some suggestion?
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Paul Kelly

Discussion  - 
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Jun C's profile photoGrant Lauritsen's profile photoPaul Kelly's profile photo
3 comments
 
I just recently ran across it. I thought it was a neat idea.. Sometimes you dont really want to read through all the questions and discussions but just want to see a working example of something. This is really nice for that.
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Can't believe #Jython 2.7 is still (for almost a year) in Beta 1. Can't install pip with it either. Embarrassing.
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Markus Banfi's profile photoAlex Abbott's profile photo
3 comments
 
Unfortunately, the dev team just isn't very big for Jython and (as can be observed here) interest has waned. There are many great JVM languages though (Clojure is another that's not been mentioned), so I'm not too worried.
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