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"There is an important caveat with cognitive psychology research on learning. Most of it has been done in labs or simulated classrooms. That’s justified because the researchers need to control variables so that the results can be reliably tied to the treatment—something those collecting data in actual classrooms can’t always control. But as Nguyen and McDaniel point out, that has meant some of the testing conditions aren’t analogous to what happens in actual classrooms. For example, researchers don’t always use educationally relevant materials. They use things like word lists or paired associations, and they’ll often employ identical or very similar quiz and test questions—something most teachers don’t do. Plus, the time between studying and testing in the lab environment tends to be much shorter than it is in college courses."


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Translating neuroscience, psychology and education: An abstracted conceptual framework for the learning sciences



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"This [free[ book brings together the lessons of research on both the nature of learning and different educational applications, and it summarises these as seven key concluding principles."
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