I've created a MeWe site. Here is the link. Let's see how we can get this rolling. The time to pursue this is NOW, in front of when this closes out. Once that happens we cannot easily communicate with each other as a group.

Here is a link: https://mewe.com/group/5c6ca8c5ee34ce3071fcc952

Let's see how this works for us.

Kevin

MeWe has been suggested as a possible alternative to this Google Plus site. A number of you have expressed interest in knowing what I am doing. I've started a Facebook Groups Nature Friend Photography page. It is private--even more private than this if I'm not mistaken, but only one of you have gone there and asked to join. Most of you who have expressed an interest in knowing what is next have not responded with suggestions or feedback on the FB Group page. I don't know what I am to make of the silence. Can I please hear your thoughts? Do you want me to pursue the MeWe group? Do you want to support the FB Group?

(I've suggested the FB might even be more private. To explain, I think it is set up in a way that non-members cannot see content. I think the Google Plus account has been viewable by non-members.)

I've created a Nature Friend Magazine Photography group in Facebook. I welcome your going there and asking to join. The address is facebook.com/groups/NatureFriendMagazinePhotography.

I don't know if I'll be able to transfer content from here to there. I rather doubt I can. If someone knows differently, please let me know.

Also, the group is a private group just as this one is. I need to approve those who join, to minimize chances of content showing up that we do not want.

Thanks.

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A Downy Woodpecker from a while ago.
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That's got to be the most amazing snowflake I've ever seen!
Snowflake-a-Day No. 48
In all my years, in my many thousands of hours working with snowflakes, I’ve never seen anything quite like this before. That’s a solid statement – and one worth spending more words on!

The previous few snowflakes (https://www.flickr.com/photos/donkom/46263921474/ and https://www.flickr.com/photos/donkom/46095818545/ ) have included elements of fusing together that creates air-gap thicknesses that can produce thin film interference effects. I’ve described this many times before, so I’ll just state that it’s the same physics as rainbows in soap bubbles… but the way it behaves here is very strange. Even more strange, is the way these snowflakes are connected.

There are really two separate crystals here forming into a single “snowflake”. I suppose the term snowflake can always mean more than one crystal, but I define it as either a single crystal, or multiple crystals that cannot be separated without destroying their collective identity. These two are intrinsically linked. There is a main “base” snowflake, the largest footprint, but then there is a smaller branched snowflake that somehow, some way, collided and “stuck” to the larger one. This part, aside from winning the cosmic lottery, I cannot explain. But this attached snowflake is very unique in its own rights!

Column-type crystals will often grow into plates on either side, running parallel and competing for available water vapour (“building blocks”) for their continued growth. When they are close, the competition is fierce and when one side gains an advantage, the other side stays at roughly the same smaller footprint it was when it’s parallel partner started growing out further. If the column is longer, however, the two plates are free to grow together without much hindrance, like we see here: https://www.flickr.com/photos/donkom/25449366121/

But that’s not the case here. We have very separated growth which should result in more even development of the two plates. Based on the fusing of the branches from the larger plate, it collided with the larger crystal in this form, or something very similar… and that I can’t explain either. Other than winning another cosmic lottery in the same image. Like getting attacked by a shark, and then surviving only because lightning strikes the shark. (I know, you'd probably die in that scenario too... but maybe you win the cosmic lottery and still survive!)

Then there is that same odd bubble tendril pattern that we saw on one of the earlier snowflakes linked above. I can’t identify the exact physics to explain why, but the “how” is starting to become obvious: when enclosed bubbles internally sublimate, with molecules flying from one side to another, they get more spherical. They leave behind traces though, that slowly become thin lines and eventually spherical bubbles on their own. The magic of natural physics at work that I wish I could explain!

Shot on the pre-production Lumix S1 I had on loan to me for a while, and one of my favourites from that camera not only for the mystery it provides, but for the level of clarity I am now growing very fond of.
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White-crested Elaenia nest
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The Caribbean Sea in Chetumal, Mexico.
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2/7/19
2 Photos - View album

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A couple flower photos from Guatemala. I don't have a name for either of them unfortunately.
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2/7/19
2 Photos - View album

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A good bird feeder setup definitely pays off during the cold winter months. Male Pine Grosbeak....

Canon 7D
600mm
F/8
1/1000th
ISO 800

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Just hanging in there...


Canon 7D
600mm
f/6.3
1/1250th
ISO 1600

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