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This community will be dedicate to using Swift on the Linux platform. 

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In our last post we showed how to create REST based web services using Swift and IBM’s Kitura framework.  In this post we will show how to serve both static and dynamic web pages with Swift using the Kitura and the Kitura Stencil frameworks. 

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The Kitura framework, developed by IBM, is a light-weight, high-performance, web framework and server written in the Swift language.  This framework allows us to very quickly develop complex web services using the Swift language and Swift’s standard Foundation APIs.  This allows us to use our existing Swift knowledge to very easily create server-side services.  We can run our Kitura based services as stand-alone applications, deploy them to IBM’s Bluemix cloud or use IBM’s pre-build Docker image. This post will introduce Kitura and show how you can begin using it for your projects.

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In a previous post we showed how to create an echo server using IBM’s BlueSocket framework.  This server was single threaded therefore it could only communicate with one client at a time.  In this post we will show how we can add libdispatch (GCD) to our code to create a multi-client server.

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In our last post we showed how to use the BlueSocket framework from IBM to create an echo server. In this post we will show how to use the same BlueSocket framework to create a client application that can communicate with the echo server from the previous post.

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In this post we will create an echo server using the BlueSocket  framework developed by IBM.  An echo server is a server application that “echoes” back to the client any text that it sends to the server.  We will be using the BlueSocket framework because it makes it very easy to develop cross-platform client and server applications, using Swift, that connect using standard sockets.  The BlueSocket framework works with applications developed for iOS, macOS and Linux systems.  We will start off by explaining what Berkeley sockets are and give a real brief introduction to network addressing.

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Free eBook from IBM and O'Reilly on extending Swift's value to the server.

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When we develop applications with Swift, for the Linux platform, we are able to use the Swift package manager to assist us with building our application.  The package manager is integrated with the build system to automate the process of downloading, compiling and linking the dependencies for our project. One of the ways that we can define a dependency is to create a module. In this post we show how we would create a Swift module.

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My new book, Mastering Swift 3 for Linux has just been released.  While most books on Swift are written to introduce the language using Apple’s development tools, this book is written for the developer that wants to use Swift on the Linux platform. 

I have always thought that a developer cannot master a programming language without a good understanding of the basics.  With that philosophy in mind the first five chapters will introduce the Swift programming language and will give the reader a good understanding of the Swift programming language.  The second half of the book will cover more advance topics such as concurrency,  network development, using C libraries with Swift and memory management including strong reference cycles.
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