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Baltimore City Health Department
1001 E. Fayette Street • Baltimore, Maryland 21202
Stephanie Rawlings-Blake, Mayor – Oxiris Barbot, M.D., Commissioner of Health
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE           
Media Contact: Michael Schwartzberg, PIO
O: (443) 984-2623 C: (443) 462-7939 E: michael.schwartzberg@baltimorecity.gov
 
Commissioner Of Health Declares Code Red Heat Alert Days
 
BALTIMORE, MD (July 15, 2013) – With forecasted highs in the upper 90s all week and temperatures expected to reach 100 degrees tomorrow, and a heat index that will be in excess of 101 degrees each day, Baltimore City Commissioner of Health Dr. Oxiris Barbot today declared a Code Red Heat Alert for Tuesday July 16 – Friday, July 19.
 
“Heat-related hospitalizations and deaths are highly preventable,” Dr. Barbot said. “During hot summer days, it’s important to stay cool, stay hydrated, and stay in touch with your neighbors, especially seniors and the medically frail who live alone or without air conditioning.”
 
A media availability with Dr. Barbot will be held at the Baltimore City Health Department at 9 a.m. Tuesday, July 16th, 1001 E. Fayette Street.
 
Baltimore City will have emergency cooling centers at the locations below open this week Tuesday through Friday from 9 a.m. – 7 p.m., each of which will have cool air and free water.
 
City cooling centers: (* A PDF map is available from BCHD for media use)
 
Northern Community Action Center -- 5225 York Road
Southern Community Action Center-- 606 Cherry Hill Road, 2nd floor
Northwest Community Action Center -- 3939 Reisterstown Road.
Southeastern Community Action Center -- 3411 Bank Street
Eastern Community Action Center – 1400 E. Federal Street
 
Waxter Senior Center – 1000 Cathedral Street
Oliver Senior Center – 1700 N. Gay Street
Sandtown – Winchester Senior Center –1601 N. Baker Street
Hatton Senior Center –2825 Fait Avenue
John Booth Senior Center – 229 ½ S. Eaton Street
Zeta Senior Center -- 4501 Reisterstown Road
 
The Baltimore City Health Department’s Code Red information page at http://www.baltimorehealth.org/coderedinfo includes tips on heat safety and staying cool and other important information.  Baltimore residents are also encouraged to follow BCHD social media accounts (Twitter: @Bmore_Healthy and Facebook: www.facebook.com/BaltimoreHealth) for weather-related messages and updates.
 
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“During extended periods of extreme heat, it’s important to drink plenty of water and limit the intake of alcoholic and caffeinated beverages,” said Dr. Barbot. “If you must be outdoors, take frequent water breaks in the shade. Seniors and those with underlying chronic conditions should be especially careful not to overexert themselves.”
 
On a Code Red Heat Alert Day, the Baltimore City Health Department recommends that city residents:
 
Drink plenty of water or juice
Avoid alcohol and caffeine
Wipe skin with cool water as needed
Reduce outside activities
Wear light-weight and light-colored clothing
Stay inside during the hottest time of day (11:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.)
Seek relief from the heat in air-conditioned locations
Check on older, sick, or frail people in your community who may need help responding to the heat
Never leave children or pets alone in closed vehicles, even for short periods of time
Watch out for signs of heat exhaustion and heat stroke:
o   Confusion
o   Nausea
o   Light-headedness
o   High body temperature with cool and clammy skin
o   Hot, dry, flushed skin
o   Rapid or slowed heart beat
o   Seek medical help immediately if any of these symptoms occur
 
City residents who want information on the closest cooling center or who are concerned about a neighbor can call 311, the city service line. Any city resident experiencing the signs of heat exhaustion or heat stroke should call 911.
 
The effects of heat are cumulative, meaning a person can become ill after several days of above average temperatures. Older adults and the medically frail are at an increased risk for developing heat-related illness. During heat waves, there is the potential for increased mortality from cardiovascular disease, respiratory illness and stroke.
 
Heat waves are silent killers. Heat is the leading weather-related killer according to the National Weather Service.  Each year, the heat kills more people than hurricanes and other weather-related phenomena combined. 
 
This is the second time this summer that a Code Red for heat was declared; the first was on July 7.
 
In 2012, Baltimore City had 13 reported heat-related deaths and 17 Code Red Heat Alert days declared. The Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (DHMH) has so far reported four heat-related deaths in 2013, but none in Baltimore City.
 
Baltimore City Animal Control advises residents to take precautions to ensure the safety of pets during these excessive temperatures. Dogs should never be left unattended in vehicles, which can quickly become a death trap for an animal if left inside during the summer months. On an 85 degree day, it only takes ten minutes for the inside of your care to reach 102 degrees, even when the windows have been left open an inch or two.
###
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE           
Media Contact: Michael Schwartzberg, PIO
O: (443) 984-2623 C: (443) 462-7939 E: michael.schwartzberg@baltimorecity.gov
 
Commissioner Of Health Declares Code Red Heat Alert Days
 
BALTIMORE, MD (July 15, 2013) – With forecasted highs in the upper 90s all week and temperatures expected to reach 100 degrees tomorrow, and a heat index that will be in excess of 101 degrees each day, Baltimore City Commissioner of Health Dr. Oxiris Barbot today declared a Code Red Heat Alert for Tuesday July 16 – Friday, July 19.
 
“Heat-related hospitalizations and deaths are highly preventable,” Dr. Barbot said. “During hot summer days, it’s important to stay cool, stay hydrated, and stay in touch with your neighbors, especially seniors and the medically frail who live alone or without air conditioning.”
 
A media availability with Dr. Barbot will be held at the Baltimore City Health Department at 9 a.m. Tuesday, July 16th, 1001 E. Fayette Street.
 
Baltimore City will have emergency cooling centers at the locations below open this week Tuesday through Friday from 9 a.m. – 7 p.m., each of which will have cool air and free water.
 
City cooling centers: (* A PDF map is available from BCHD for media use)
 
Northern Community Action Center -- 5225 York Road
Southern Community Action Center-- 606 Cherry Hill Road, 2nd floor
Northwest Community Action Center -- 3939 Reisterstown Road.
Southeastern Community Action Center -- 3411 Bank Street
Eastern Community Action Center – 1400 E. Federal Street
 
Waxter Senior Center – 1000 Cathedral Street
Oliver Senior Center – 1700 N. Gay Street
Sandtown – Winchester Senior Center –1601 N. Baker Street
Hatton Senior Center –2825 Fait Avenue
John Booth Senior Center – 229 ½ S. Eaton Street
Zeta Senior Center -- 4501 Reisterstown Road
 
The Baltimore City Health Department’s Code Red information page at http://www.baltimorehealth.org/coderedinfo includes tips on heat safety and staying cool and other important information.  Baltimore residents are also encouraged to follow BCHD social media accounts (Twitter: @Bmore_Healthy and Facebook: www.facebook.com/BaltimoreHealth) for weather-related messages and updates.
 
- more-
2-2-2
 
“During extended periods of extreme heat, it’s important to drink plenty of water and limit the intake of alcoholic and caffeinated beverages,” said Dr. Barbot. “If you must be outdoors, take frequent water breaks in the shade. Seniors and those with underlying chronic conditions should be especially careful not to overexert themselves.”
 
On a Code Red Heat Alert Day, the Baltimore City Health Department recommends that city residents:
 
Drink plenty of water or juice
Avoid alcohol and caffeine
Wipe skin with cool water as needed
Reduce outside activities
Wear light-weight and light-colored clothing
Stay inside during the hottest time of day (11:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.)
Seek relief from the heat in air-conditioned locations
Check on older, sick, or frail people in your community who may need help responding to the heat
Never leave children or pets alone in closed vehicles, even for short periods of time
Watch out for signs of heat exhaustion and heat stroke:
o   Confusion
o   Nausea
o   Light-headedness
o   High body temperature with cool and clammy skin
o   Hot, dry, flushed skin
o   Rapid or slowed heart beat
o   Seek medical help immediately if any of these symptoms occur
 
City residents who want information on the closest cooling center or who are concerned about a neighbor can call 311, the city service line. Any city resident experiencing the signs of heat exhaustion or heat stroke should call 911.
 
The effects of heat are cumulative, meaning a person can become ill after several days of above average temperatures. Older adults and the medically frail are at an increased risk for developing heat-related illness. During heat waves, there is the potential for increased mortality from cardiovascular disease, respiratory illness and stroke.
 
Heat waves are silent killers. Heat is the leading weather-related killer according to the National Weather Service.  Each year, the heat kills more people than hurricanes and other weather-related phenomena combined. 
 
This is the second time this summer that a Code Red for heat was declared; the first was on July 7.
 
In 2012, Baltimore City had 13 reported heat-related deaths and 17 Code Red Heat Alert days declared. The Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (DHMH) has so far reported four heat-related deaths in 2013, but none in Baltimore City.
 
Baltimore City Animal Control advises residents to take precautions to ensure the safety of pets during these excessive temperatures. Dogs should never be left unattended in vehicles, which can quickly become a death trap for an animal if left inside during the summer months. On an 85 degree day, it only takes ten minutes for the inside of your care to reach 102 degrees, even when the windows have been left open an inch or two.
###
 
 
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE           
Media Contact: Michael Schwartzberg, PIO
O: (443) 984-2623 C: (443) 462-7939 E: michael.schwartzberg@baltimorecity.gov
 
Commissioner Of Health Declares Code Red Heat Alert Days
 
BALTIMORE, MD (July 15, 2013) – With forecasted highs in the upper 90s all week and temperatures expected to reach 100 degrees tomorrow, and a heat index that will be in excess of 101 degrees each day, Baltimore City Commissioner of Health Dr. Oxiris Barbot today declared a Code Red Heat Alert for Tuesday July 16 – Friday, July 19.
 
“Heat-related hospitalizations and deaths are highly preventable,” Dr. Barbot said. “During hot summer days, it’s important to stay cool, stay hydrated, and stay in touch with your neighbors, especially seniors and the medically frail who live alone or without air conditioning.”
 
A media availability with Dr. Barbot will be held at the Baltimore City Health Department at 9 a.m. Tuesday, July 16th, 1001 E. Fayette Street.
 
Baltimore City will have emergency cooling centers at the locations below open this week Tuesday through Friday from 9 a.m. – 7 p.m., each of which will have cool air and free water.
 
City cooling centers: (* A PDF map is available from BCHD for media use)
 
Northern Community Action Center -- 5225 York Road
Southern Community Action Center-- 606 Cherry Hill Road, 2nd floor
Northwest Community Action Center -- 3939 Reisterstown Road.
Southeastern Community Action Center -- 3411 Bank Street
Eastern Community Action Center – 1400 E. Federal Street
 
Waxter Senior Center – 1000 Cathedral Street
Oliver Senior Center – 1700 N. Gay Street
Sandtown – Winchester Senior Center –1601 N. Baker Street
Hatton Senior Center –2825 Fait Avenue
John Booth Senior Center – 229 ½ S. Eaton Street
Zeta Senior Center -- 4501 Reisterstown Road
 
The Baltimore City Health Department’s Code Red information page at http://www.baltimorehealth.org/coderedinfo includes tips on heat safety and staying cool and other important information.  Baltimore residents are also encouraged to follow BCHD social media accounts (Twitter: @Bmore_Healthy and Facebook: www.facebook.com/BaltimoreHealth) for weather-related messages and updates.
 
- more-
2-2-2
 
“During extended periods of extreme heat, it’s important to drink plenty of water and limit the intake of alcoholic and caffeinated beverages,” said Dr. Barbot. “If you must be outdoors, take frequent water breaks in the shade. Seniors and those with underlying chronic conditions should be especially careful not to overexert themselves.”
 
On a Code Red Heat Alert Day, the Baltimore City Health Department recommends that city residents:
 
Drink plenty of water or juice
Avoid alcohol and caffeine
Wipe skin with cool water as needed
Reduce outside activities
Wear light-weight and light-colored clothing
Stay inside during the hottest time of day (11:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.)
Seek relief from the heat in air-conditioned locations
Check on older, sick, or frail people in your community who may need help responding to the heat
Never leave children or pets alone in closed vehicles, even for short periods of time
Watch out for signs of heat exhaustion and heat stroke:
o   Confusion
o   Nausea
o   Light-headedness
o   High body temperature with cool and clammy skin
o   Hot, dry, flushed skin
o   Rapid or slowed heart beat
o   Seek medical help immediately if any of these symptoms occur
 
City residents who want information on the closest cooling center or who are concerned about a neighbor can call 311, the city service line. Any city resident experiencing the signs of heat exhaustion or heat stroke should call 911.
 
The effects of heat are cumulative, meaning a person can become ill after several days of above average temperatures. Older adults and the medically frail are at an increased risk for developing heat-related illness. During heat waves, there is the potential for increased mortality from cardiovascular disease, respiratory illness and stroke.
 
Heat waves are silent killers. Heat is the leading weather-related killer according to the National Weather Service.  Each year, the heat kills more people than hurricanes and other weather-related phenomena combined. 
 
This is the second time this summer that a Code Red for heat was declared; the first was on July 7.
 
In 2012, Baltimore City had 13 reported heat-related deaths and 17 Code Red Heat Alert days declared. The Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (DHMH) has so far reported four heat-related deaths in 2013, but none in Baltimore City.
 
Baltimore City Animal Control advises residents to take precautions to ensure the safety of pets during these excessive temperatures. Dogs should never be left unattended in vehicles, which can quickly become a death trap for an animal if left inside during the summer months. On an 85 degree day, it only takes ten minutes for the inside of your care to reach 102 degrees, even when the windows have been left open an inch or two.
###
 
Baltimore City Cooling Centers, 2013
 
FOR UPDATES OR
MORE INFO
CALL 3-1-1
COOLING CENTERS
weekdays 9am-7pm; weekends 11am-7pm
Northern Community Action Center (5225 York Road)
Southern Community Action Center (606 Cherry Hill Road (2nd flr)
Northwest Community Action Center (3939 Reisterstown Road)
Southeastern Community Action Center (3411 Bank Street)
Eastern Community Action Center (1400 E. Federal Street)
9am-7pm weekdays only
Waxter Senior Center (1000 Cathedral Street)
Oliver Senior Center (1700 N. Gay Street)
Sandtown-Winchester Senior Center (1601 N. Baker St.)
Hatton Senior Center (2825 Fait Avenue)
John Booth Senior Center (229 ½ S. Eaton St.)
Zeta Senior Center (4501 Reisterstown Rd.)
 

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