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Fred Herrmann

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The “Iris Nebula” is a reflection nebula at a distance of 1,300 light-years in the constellation Cepheus and spans six light-years.  The bright magnitude 3.5 star at its center is Alpha Cephei.
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Fred Herrmann's profile photoMarilyne Chenuet's profile photo
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I have to make a correction..  It was late when I posted this yesterday.  The star at the center is actually magnitude +7 star, SAO 19158.
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An English major at a university was taking an astronomy course to satisfy the science requirement. During the last lecture of the semester, the professor spoke about some of the more exotic objects in the universe including black holes. Despite his teacher's enthusiasm, the student showed no interest, as was the case for all his astronomy classes during the semester. When the bell rang, the student turned to his friend and said, "The prof says that black holes are interesting, but I think they suck."

Nudge nudge
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mathew fox's profile photo
 
dry bro
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Fred Herrmann

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Herbig-Haro objects are formed by the collision of newly formed stars and molecular clouds of gas and dust.  When a new star slams into a dust cloud at a speed measured in hundreds of miles per second it forms narrow jets of ejected material.

Herbig-Haro 555 is located at the tip of the bok globule in IC5070 and is annotated by the small arrow at the right-center of the image.  IC5070 is an emission nebula in the constellation Cygnus at a distance of 1,600 light-years.

http://owlmountainobservatory.com 
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Marilyne Chenuet's profile photojeanettesdaughter's profile photoAbdul Aziz's profile photo
 
Oh Joliii ! (oh prettyyy !)
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Fred Herrmann

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The Messier marathon continues.  M103 is an open cluster in the constellation Cassiopeia at a distance of 10,000 light-years from Earth. Charles Messier added this star cluster to his catalog in 1781.  

You can visit the new Messier Catalog at: 

http://owlmountainobservatory.com 
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Matthew Smith

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NGC 1783 - A youthful cluster

In this image taken by the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) aboard the Hubble Space Telescope you can see the globular cluster NGC 1783. It is located in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) about 160,000 light-years away from Earth in the southern constellation of Dorado. It has a mass around 170,000 times that of our Sun. The cluster is one of the younger globular clusters estimated to be under one and a half billion years old.

First observed by John Herschel (https://goo.gl/WCo123) in 1835 it was later added to the New General Catalogue (NGC, https://goo.gl/N9cGyH) as NGC 1783 by Johan Ludvig Emil Dreyer (https://goo.gl/fNHL6v).

More information here:
https://www.spacetelescope.org/images/potw1534a/

What is a globular cluster?

A globular cluster is a spherical collection of up to millions of stars orbiting a galaxy as a satellite. They have very high stellar densities at their core. More information here:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Globular_cluster

The Large Magellanic Cloud

The Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) is a satellite galaxy of our Milky Way, its distance to Earth is about 160,000 light-years. It has a diameter of about 14,000 light-years and is it roughly 1/100 as massive as the Milky Way. More information here:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Large_Magellanic_Cloud

Image credit: NGC 1783 ESA/Hubble & NASA Acknowledgement: Judy Schmidt (geckzilla.comhttp://bit.ly/1LvbUf6 CC BY 3.0 http://bit.ly/1BSTMl1

#science   #astronomy   #ngc1783   #globularcluster   #space   #lmc   #largemagellaniccloud   #starformation  
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Take a look at a short film inspired by the work and life of Carl Sagan, a 20th century astronomer and science popularizer.
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Honey Dubey's profile photoRatimir Rakuljic's profile photoLuztalia Lee's profile photo
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+Honey Dubey I'm glad you liked the film :) Of course, please do share it.
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Fred Herrmann

Discussion  - 
 
SH2-88 is a emission nebula in the constellation Vulpecula (Little Fox) 7,800 light-years distant.  There are several star forming structures within the image.
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Fred Herrmann

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NGC6366 is a faint and open globular cluster with magnitude 13.6 stars as its brightest stars.  Magnitude 4.5 47 Ophiuchi is at the upper right. NGC6366 is located in the constellation Ophiuchus (serpent-bearer) at a distance of 11.4 light-years.

http://owlmountainobservatory.com 
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Oscar Rivera

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Tonight Perseid Meteor Shower! Tune in to live NASA TV program to see the light show: http://go.nasa.gov/1J4UaVn
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Ryan  O'Donnell's profile photoMushr88m's profile photoMarilyne Chenuet's profile photo
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+Ryan O'Donnell I might just do that. 
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Matthew Smith

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These three bright nebulae are often featured in telescopic tours of the constellation Sagittarius and the crowded starfields of the central Milky Way. In fact, 18th century cosmic tourist Charles Messier cataloged two of them; M8, the large nebula left of center, and colorful M20 on the right. The third, NGC 6559, is above M8, separated from the larger nebula by a dark dust lane. All three are stellar nurseries about five thousand light-years or so distant. The expansive M8, over a hundred light-years across, is also known as the Lagoon Nebula. M20's popular moniker is the Trifid. Glowing hydrogen gas creates the dominant red color of the emission nebulae, with contrasting blue hues, most striking in the Trifid, due to dust reflected starlight. The colorful skyscape recorded with telescope and digital camera also includes one of Messier's open star clusters, M21, just above the Trifid.
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Nagarajan Venkataraman's profile photoMarilyne Chenuet's profile photointergalactical dustman (choose peace)'s profile photo
 
Could anyone suggest a good and basic telescope to buy.
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Fred Herrmann

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Planetary nebulae are the result of red giant stars and their expanding shell of ionized gas remnants. William Herschel named them "planetary" nebula since they resembled the round shape of planets.  However, as this picture illustrates planetary nebula can take on a variety of shapes and sizes depending on their distance, and the way in which their core star(s) interact with their expanding gas shells.

http://owlmountainobservatory.com 
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Mehwish Moiz

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The Seagull Nebula
Image Credit & Copyright: Dieter Willasch (Astro-Cabinet)
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap150829.html

A broad expanse of glowing gas and dust presents a bird-like visage to astronomers from planet Earth, suggesting its popular moniker - The Seagull Nebula. This portrait of the cosmic bird covers a 1.6 degree wide swath across the plane of the Milky Way, near the direction of Sirius, alpha star of the constellation Canis Major. Of course, the region includes objects with other catalog designations: notably NGC 2327, a compact, dusty emission region with an embedded massive star that forms the bird's head (aka the Parrot Nebula, above center). Dominated by the reddish glow of atomic hydrogen, the complex of gas and dust clouds with bright young stars spans over 100 light-years at an estimated 3,800 light-year distance.
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Uranus and Neptune aren't really gas giants (but still kind of) they're more of a ice planets rather than gas giants 
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Adam Synergy's profile photoJeff Boerst's profile photodon gilchrist's profile photo
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Thank you for the information, +Adam Synergy ! If the papers are geared more toward novices, I would definitely like to read them, but if they're mainly academic, I'm afraid I don't have enough background to be able to understand them well enough. Do you know of any in depth books written for lay folks from which a lay person might gain a deeper understanding of both the Gas and Ice Giants? Cheers!
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Andrew Watt

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Will we see a two Moons in the sky tonight? Lots of people on social media think we will!
Rumours have been circulating on social media that tonight (August 27th), it will appear as though there are 2 moons in the night sky. The belief is that Mars will pass so close to Earth that it...
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Devin! IFLA's profile photo
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Amazing people can fall for these Lies.
Just throwin it out there lol
Iif anybody thinks these things are possible just
GooGLe iiT & find a Reliable source for the FacTs lol..

Oooh And the Earth Will Be Visible From Earth Tonight.
Cant wait 😉😉
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Gurcharan Bhatt

Discussion  - 
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AL GIRO's profile photoRobert Inness's profile photoJustine McGrath's profile photojeanettesdaughter's profile photo
 
Now disclosure is closer than ever..  and all because of your efforts. 
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Rithin Mohan

Discussion  - 
 
 
What do u think? Should India and China be allies to make a superpower in Asia?
992 votes  -  votes visible to Public
Hell ya!!!!!
29%
Na
53%
50-50
19%
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Mushr88m's profile photo
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Allies fall out. 
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Matthew Smith

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The star-forming region NGC 3603 - seen here in the latest Hubble Space Telescope image - contains one of the most impressive massive young star clusters in the Milky Way. Bathed in gas and dust the cluster formed in a huge rush of star formation thought to have occurred around a million years ago. The hot blue stars at the core are responsible for carving out a huge cavity in the gas seen to the right of the star cluster in NGC 3603's centre.

Credit:
NASA, ESA and the Hubble Heritage (STScI/AURA)-ESA/Hubble Collaboration
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Hubert Assey

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In our life time will we be able to discover planets in other galaxy's such as andromeda 
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Say you pointed your ship capable of perpetual acceleration at 1g toward Andromeda, and halfway across the void you turned around to decelerate, so the whole trip would be spent quite comfortably at earth normal gravity. It'd take just 62 generations, ingoring relativistic effects, but if your ship had no port holes, there's at least a quantum mechanical argument that it'd work.
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Oscar Rivera

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Rosetta is ready for perihelion. Want to find out what perihelion is all about? Join on Google+ Hangout tomorrow, 13 August, at 13:00 GMT/15:00 CEST.

Sign up for a reminder here: http://bit.ly/PerihelionHangout

Source: ESA
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Mycll d.D's profile photoChuck Sickels's profile photo
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Yeah lets hope so...
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Matthew Smith

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Hubble spots a celestial bauble



This delicate shell, photographed by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, appears to float serenely in the depths of space, but this apparent calm hides an inner turmoil. The gaseous envelope formed as the expanding blast wave and ejected material from a supernova tore through the nearby interstellar medium. Called SNR B0509-67.5 (or SNR 0509 for short), the bubble is the visible remnant of a powerful stellar explosion in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), a small galaxy about 160 000 light-years from Earth. Ripples in the shell’s surface may be caused either by subtle variations in the density of the ambient interstellar gas, or possibly be driven from the interior by fragments from the initial explosion. The bubble-shaped shroud of gas is 23 light-years across and is expanding at more than 18 million km/h.

Hubble’s Advanced Camera for Surveys observed the supernova remnant on 28 October 2006 with a filter that isolates light from the glowing hydrogen seen in the expanding shell. These observations were then combined with visible-light images of the surrounding star field that were imaged with Hubble’s Wide Field Camera 3 on 4 November 2010.

Credit:

NASA, ESA, and the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA). Acknowledgement: J. Hughes (Rutgers University)


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lloyd rickard's profile photoDawn Pearce's profile photo
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T x. . A . THIS IS A MYSTIC & POWERFULL site. 
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