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Todd Lowe

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What's up out there tonight?
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Tonight - dark.
Followed by widely scattered light at dawn.
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Mathieu Tendron

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Cassiopia A - Glowing remains of an old supernova

Glowing gaseous streamers of red, white, and blue — as well as green and pink — illuminate the heavens like Fourth of July fireworks. The colorful streamers that float across the sky in this photo taken by NASA's Hubble Space Telescope were created by one of the biggest firecrackers seen to go off in our galaxy in recorded history, the titanic supernova explosion of a massive star. The light from the exploding star reached Earth 320 years ago, nearly a century before our United States celebrated its birth with a bang.

The dead star's shredded remains are called Cassiopeia A, or "Cas A" for short. Cas A is the youngest known supernova remnant in our Milky Way Galaxy and resides 10,000 light-years away in the constellation Cassiopeia, so the star actually blew up 10,000 years before the light reached Earth in the late 1600s.

This stunning Hubble image of Cas A is allowing astronomers to study the supernova's remains with great clarity, showing for the first time that the debris is arranged into thousands of small, cooling knots of gas. This material eventually will be recycled into building new generations of stars and planets. Our own Sun and planets are constructed from the debris of supernovae that exploded billions of years ago.

This photo shows the upper rim of the supernova remnant's expanding shell. Near the top of the image are dozens of tiny clumps of matter. Each small clump, originally just a small fragment of the star, is tens of times larger than the diameter of our solar system.

Image Credit:   NASA / Hubble
 
Cassiopia A - Glowing remains of an old supernova

Glowing gaseous streamers of red, white, and blue — as well as green and pink — illuminate the heavens like Fourth of July fireworks. The colorful streamers that float across the sky in this photo taken by NASA's Hubble Space Telescope were created by one of the biggest firecrackers seen to go off in our galaxy in recorded history, the titanic supernova explosion of a massive star. The light from the exploding star reached Earth 320 years ago, nearly a century before our United States celebrated its birth with a bang.

The dead star's shredded remains are called Cassiopeia A, or "Cas A" for short. Cas A is the youngest known supernova remnant in our Milky Way Galaxy and resides 10,000 light-years away in the constellation Cassiopeia, so the star actually blew up 10,000 years before the light reached Earth in the late 1600s.

This stunning Hubble image of Cas A is allowing astronomers to study the supernova's remains with great clarity, showing for the first time that the debris is arranged into thousands of small, cooling knots of gas. This material eventually will be recycled into building new generations of stars and planets. Our own Sun and planets are constructed from the debris of supernovae that exploded billions of years ago.

This photo shows the upper rim of the supernova remnant's expanding shell. Near the top of the image are dozens of tiny clumps of matter. Each small clump, originally just a small fragment of the star, is tens of times larger than the diameter of our solar system.

The colors highlight parts of the debris where chemical elements are glowing. The dark blue fragments, for example, are richest in oxygen; the red material is rich in sulfur.

The star that created this colorful show was a big one, about 15 to 25 times more massive than our Sun. Massive stars like the one that created Cas A have short lives. They use up their supply of nuclear fuel in tens of millions of years, 1,000 times faster than our Sun. With their fuel exhausted, heavy stars begin a complex chain of events that lead to the final dramatic explosion. Their cores rapidly collapse, releasing an enormous amount of gravitational energy. This sudden burst of energy reverses the collapse and tosses most of the star's mass into space. The ejected material can travel as fast as 45 million miles per hour (72 million kilometers per hour).


Image Credit: NASA and The Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA)

Acknowledgment: R. Fesen (Dartmouth) and J. Morse (Univ. of Colorado)
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Speechless an gripping
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Saat Bellaflor

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Aakash Ezhilan

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Hello, I have started a new channel called "AE Sci Studio" in which I will uploading videos related to physics, chemistry and maths.
Hope you like and do subscribe.

Do see. Thanks.

URL:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UlsDIk3znY0&feature=youtu.be
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Gamma-ray bursts (Gamma-ray bursts, and GRB) are one of the most powerful high-energy events in the universe. Although these events are the brightest explosions in the universe, but in a new study carried out using X-ray Observatory, NASA 'Chandra', a satellite of NASA "Swift" and other telescopes, it is concluded that most of these outbreaks could still avoid registration using surveillance equipment.

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And if one went off near us and was aimed this way, we'd see a very bright light and then forever darkness for all.
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Saat Bellaflor

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So what is the difference between meteors, comets and asteroids?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6AuhtiG4lY8
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Cognitio

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The aberration of light (also called astronomical aberration or stellar aberration) is the apparent displacement of the stars in the sky, due to the motion of the Earth’s revolution and the fact that the speed of light is finite...
The aberration of light (also called astronomical aberration or stellar aberration) is the apparent displacement
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Saat Bellaflor

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#SpaceScience image of the week is this striking view of comet #67P /Churyumov–Gerasimenko, revealing portions of both comet lobes, with dramatic shadows on the 'neck' region between them. It was taken by Rosetta’s navigation camera (NavCam) on 30 June 2016, from a distance of 25.8 km, and measures about 2.3 km across. 

Read more: http://www.esa.int/spaceinimages/Images/2016/07/Comet_cliffs

Credit: ESA/Rosetta/NavCam – CC BY-SA IGO 3.0
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Gary

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Google Maps for the Sky

Google certainly has an expertise in mapping, and that skill set even extends to the sky. You might be surprised to learn that Google actually has a Google Maps version for the sky. The site allows users to view constellations, planets and anything else a burgeoning or hobbyist astronomer might want to explore.

"Google Sky Map" is an Android app for smartphones

"Google Sky" is a browser-based astronomy app
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Raul Alvar

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Ecosistemas de la Galaxia.

Los Planetas Oculares (Eyeball Planets)
Descubrir un Mundo nuevo debe ser una experiencia inolvidable. Ser el primer ser humano que observa un planeta desconocido es todo un privilegio. No es de extrañar que ...

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Descubrir un Mundo nuevo debe ser una experiencia inolvidable. Ser el primer ser humano que observa un planeta desconocido es todo un privilegio. No es de extrañar que el descubridor de planetas Mikko Tuomi, sobre el que hemo...
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Karthik Easvur

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International Space Station - Time-lapse :)
Puducherry, India.
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Alan Brown

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The Pleiades (the Seven Sisters) - Messier 45

In this infrared image taken by the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer ( WISE ) and processed by Judy Schmidt. Messier-45 is an open star cluster located in the constellation of Taurus located some 444 light-years away from Earth. The whole cluster is over 13 light-years in diameter.

The Pleiades are easy to locate in the night sky. Just follow a line drawn up from Orions belt and they are clearly visible a hands width from the belt.


Image credit: Judy Schmidt based on WISE Data by NASA & JPL-Caltech
 
The Pleiades (the Seven Sisters) - Messier 45

In this infrared image taken by the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer ( WISE ) and processed by Judy Schmidt. Messier-45 is an open star cluster located in the constellation of Taurus located some 444 light-years away from Earth. The whole cluster is over 13 light-years in diameter.

The Pleiades are easy to locate in the night sky. Just follow a line drawn up from Orions belt and they are clearly visible a hands width from the belt.

The Pleiades are dominated by middle-aged hot B-type stars The faint glow visible around the stars is starlight reflecting from dust clouds in the interstellar medium, through which the stars are currently passing.

The Pleiades are commonly called the "Seven Sisters", the brightest stars of the cluster are named after the Seven Sisters of Greek mythology. The brightest star is Alcyone which you can be see to the left and bottom of the image, although in the infrared part of the spectrum Alcyone doesn't stand out from the other sisters. It has a luminosity about 2,400 times that of our Sun and about 8 times its radius.

Image credit: Judy Schmidt based on WISE Data by NASA & JPL-Caltech
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Beautiful
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Russell Bateman

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Live views of objects in space, from planets to nebulae! With astro images, Q&A and lively debate, come join us for our weekly hangout!

Previous Episodes: http://www.youtube.com/GlobalStarPartyLive

Places to find us:
Twitter: https://twitter.com/globalstarparty
Google+: https://plus.google.com/+GlobalStarPartyLive
YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/globalstarpartylive
Flickr: https://www.flickr.com/groups/globalstarparty

Submit Images for the show on either the event page or our flickr group
This Hangout On Air is hosted by Global Star Party Live. The live video broadcast will begin soon.
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Global Star Party - Canada/USA Edition
Sat, July 23, 10:00 PM
Hangouts On Air - Broadcast for free

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Jie Yang

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Solar corona is an aura of plasma surrounding the sun. It extends millions of kilometers into space and is most easily seen during a total solar eclipse. People usually observe solar corona using coronagraph. This equipment can artificially block the disk of the sun and hence image the regions around it. Nevertheless, the images of …
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The Earth is located in the center of the habitable zone of sun, but on planets located on the outer edge of the habitable zone of a star, can be supported more severe conditions, including prolonged era of glaciation, interspersed with short bursts of warming, scientists suggest in a new job.

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'Frankenstein' Galaxy Surprises Astronomers
 
About 250 million light-years away, there's a neighborhood of our universe that astronomers had considered quiet and unremarkable. But now, scientists have uncovered an enormous, bizarre galaxy possibly formed from the parts of other galaxies. 
 
 
 
A new study to be published in the Astrophysical Journal reveals the secret of UGC 1382, a galaxy that had originally been thought to be old, small and typical. Instead, scientists using data from NASA telescopes and other observatories have discovered that the galaxy is 10 times bigger than previously thought and, unlike most galaxies, its insides are younger than its outsides, almost as if it had been built using spare parts.
 
 
 
"This rare, 'Frankenstein' galaxy formed and is able to survive because it lies in a quiet little suburban neighborhood of the universe, where none of the hubbub of the more crowded parts can bother it," said study co-author Mark Seibert of the Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, Pasadena, California. "It is so delicate that a slight nudge from a neighbor would cause it to disintegrate."
 
 
 
Seibert and Lea Hagen, a graduate student at Pennsylvania State University, University Park, came upon this galaxy by accident. They had been looking for stars forming in run-of-the-mill elliptical galaxies, which do not spin and are more three-dimensional and football-shaped than flat disks. Astronomers originally thought that UGC 1382 was one of those.
 
 
 
But while looking at images of galaxies in ultraviolet light through data from NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX), a behemoth began to emerge from the darkness.
 
 
 
"We saw spiral arms extending far outside this galaxy, which no one had noticed before, and which elliptical galaxies should not have," said Hagen, who led the study. "That put us on an expedition to find out what this galaxy is and how it formed."
 
 
 
Researchers then looked at data of the galaxy from other telescopes: the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, the Two Micron All-Sky Survey (2MASS), NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), the National Radio Astronomy Observatory's Very Large Array and Carnegie's du Pont Telescope at Las Campanas Observatory. After GALEX revealed previously unseen structures to the astronomers, optical and infrared light observations from the other telescopes allowed the researchers to build a new model of this mysterious galaxy.
 
 
 
As it turns out, UGC 1382, at about 718,000 light-years across, is more than seven times wider than the Milky Way. It is also one of the three largest isolated disk galaxies ever discovered, according to the study. This galaxy is a rotating disk of low-density gas. Stars don't form here very quickly because the gas is so spread out.  
 
 
 
But the biggest surprise was how the relative ages of the galaxy's components appear backwards. In most galaxies, the innermost portion forms first and contains the oldest stars. As the galaxy grows, its outer, newer regions have the youngest stars. Not so with UGC 1382. By combining observations from many different telescopes, astronomers were able to piece together the historical record of when stars formed in this galaxy -- and the result was bizarre.
 
 
 
"The center of UGC 1382 is actually younger than the spiral disk surrounding it," Seibert said. "It's old on the outside and young on the inside. This is like finding a tree whose inner growth rings are younger than the outer rings."
 
 
 
The unique galactic structure may have resulted from separate entities coming together, rather than a single entity that grew outward. In other words, two parts of the galaxy seem to have evolved independently before merging -- each with its own history.
 
 
 
At first, there was likely a group of small galaxies dominated by gas and dark matter, which is an invisible substance that makes up about 27 percent of all matter and energy in the universe (our own matter is only 5 percent). Later, a lenticular galaxy, a rotating disk without spiral arms, would have formed nearby. At least 3 billion years ago, the smaller galaxies may have fallen into orbit around the lenticular galaxy, eventually settling into the wide disk seen today.
 
 
 
More galaxies like this may exist, but more research is needed to look for them.
 
 
 
"By understanding this galaxy, we can get clues to how galaxies form on a larger scale, and uncover more galactic neighborhood surprises," Hagen said.
 
 
 
The GALEX mission, which ended in 2013 after more than a decade of scanning the skies in ultraviolet light, was led by scientists at Caltech in Pasadena, California. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, also in Pasadena, managed the mission and built the science instrument. Data for the 2MASS and WISE missions are archived at the Infrared Processing and Analysis Center (IPAC) at Caltech. JPL is managed by Caltech for NASA.
 
The Image
 
Frankenstein Galaxy
 
The galaxy UGC 1382 has been revealed to be far larger and stranger than previously thought. Astronomers relied on a combination of ground-based and space telescopes to uncover the true nature of this “Frankenstein galaxy.” The composite image shows the same galaxy as viewed with different instruments. The component images are also available.
 
 
 
In the image at left, UGC 1382 appears to be a simple elliptical galaxy, based on optical data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). But spiral arms emerged when astronomers incorporated ultraviolet data from the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) and deep optical data from SDSS, as seen in the middle image. Combining that with a view of low-density hydrogen gas (shown in green), detected at radio wavelengths by the Very Large Array, scientists discovered that UGC 1382 is a giant, and one of the largest isolated galaxies known. 
 
 
 
GALEX in particular was able detect very faint features because it operated from space, which is necessary for UV observations because ultraviolet light is absorbed by the Earth's atmosphere. Astronomers also used Stripe 82 of SDSS, a small region of sky where SDSS imaged the sky 80 times longer than the original standard SDSS survey. This enabled optical detection of much fainter features as well. 
 
 
 
Caltech in Pasadena led the GALEX mission, which ended in 2013 after more than a decade of scanning the skies in ultraviolet light. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, also in Pasadena, managed the mission and built the science instrument. Data for the 2MASS and WISE missions are archived at IPAC. JPL is managed by Caltech for NASA.
 
Image credit: NASA/JPL/Caltech/SDSS/NRAO/L. Hagen and M. Seibert
 Last Updated: July 11, 2016Editor: Tony Greicius #spaceexploration #galaxies #GALEX #galaxyevolutionexplorer
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Saat Bellaflor

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From our Juno spacecraft at Jupiter to frosts of summer on Mars, here are a few things to know about our solar system this week: http://nasa.tumblr.com/post/147252527189/solar-system-things-to-know-this-week
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