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SpaceTime

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In a rencent paper (Bartels et al. 2016) published on Phisical Review Letters, the authors found that millisecond pulsars are responsible of the galactic center GeV eccess.

The paper is available online at>>
http://journals.aps.org/prl/abstract/10.1103/PhysRevLett.116.051102

Other posts are here>>
https://plus.google.com/collection/I6sfx
Image: The Milky Way. Credit: Serge Brunier Using γ-ray data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope, various groups have identified a clear excess emission in the inner Galaxy, at energies around a few GeV. This excess attracted...
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SpaceTime

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A scale model of the solar system

On a dry lakebed in Nevada, a group of friends build the first scale model of the solar system with complete planetary orbits: a true illustration of our place in the universe.

The film is not recommended for those suffering from vertigo in front of the awareness of how small we are in the universe... :)
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R Loves Country

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dina twiny's profile photobhanu srihridai's profile photoMuhammad naveed's profile photoKrasimir Mikov's profile photo
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Reminds me of one of those fancy layered cocktails... The "Planetary Pounder". lol!
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SpaceTime

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Double Neutron Stars (DNS) have to survive two supernovae and still remain bound. For this reason these systems are a unique and rare population of neutron stars and sets strong limits on the nature of the second collapse.
In a recent paper (Beniamini & Piras 2016) the authors analyze the conditions for the formation of double neutron stars systems.
Image: Artistic representation of Doulbe Neutron Stars. Credit: NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center Double Neutron Stars (DNS) have to survive two supernovae and still remain bound. For this reason these systems are a unique and...
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Josiah Weimert's profile photoMarilyne Chenuet's profile photo
 
thats amazing
how are they stillin orbit after two supernova
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Avi Agarwal

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WHAT CAME BEFORE THE BIG BANG?

Astronomers are pretty sure what happened after the Big Bang, but what came before? What are the leading theories for the causes of the Big Bang?

About 13.8 billion years ago the Universe started with a bang, kicked the doors in, brought fancy cheeses and a bag of ice, spiked the punch bowl and invited the new neighbors over for all-nighter to encompass all all-nighters from that point forward.
But what happened before that?

What was going on before the Big Bang? Usually, we tell the story of the Universe by starting at the Big Bang and then talking about what happened after. Similarly and completely opposite to how astronomers view the Universe… by standing in the present and looking backwards. From here, the furthest we can look back is to the cosmic microwave background, which is about 380,000 years after the big bang.

Before that we couldn’t hope to see a thing, the Universe was just too hot and dense to be transparent. Like pea soup. Soup made of delicious face burning high energy everything.
In traditional stupid earth-bound no-Tardis life unsatisfactory fashion, we can’t actually observe the origin of the Universe from our place in time and space.

Damn you… place in time and space.

Fortunately, the thinky types have come up with some ideas, and they’re all one part crazy, one part mind bendy, and 100% bananas. The first idea is that it all began as a kind of quantum fluctuation that inflated to our present universe.

Artistic view of a radiating black hole. Credit: NASA
Artistic view of a radiating black hole. Credit: NASA
Something very, very subtle expanding over time resulting in, as an accidental byproduct, our existence. The alternate idea is that our universe began within a black hole of an older universe.
I’m gonna let you think about that one. Just let your brain simmer there.

There was universe “here”, that isn’t our universe, then that universe became a black hole… and from that black hole formed us and EVERYTHING around us. Literally, everything around us. In every direction we look, and even the stuff we just assume to be out there.

Here’s another one. We see particles popping into existence here in our Universe. What if, after an immense amount of time, a whole Universe’s worth of particles all popped into existence at the same time. Seriously… an immense amount of time, with lots and lots of “almost” universes that didn’t make the cut.

BICEP2 Telescope at twilight at the South Pole, Antartica (Credit: Steffen Richter, Harvard University)
BICEP2 Telescope at twilight at the South Pole, Antartica (Credit: Steffen Richter, Harvard University)
More recently, the BICEP2 team observed what may be evidence of inflation in the early Universe.
Like any claim of this gravity, the result is hotly debated. If the idea of inflation is correct, it is possible that our universe is part of a much larger multiverse. And the most popular form would produce a kind of eternal inflation, where universes are springing up all the time. Ours would just happen to be one of them.

It is also possible that asking what came before the big bang is much like asking what is north of the North Pole. What looks like a beginning in need of a cause may just be due to our own perspective. We like to think of effects always having a cause, but the Universe might be an exception. The Universe might simply be. Because.

You tell me. What was going on before the party started? Let me know in the comments below
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Josiah Weimert's profile photoDawn LoudermilkBurrid's profile photo
 
there was no big bang, all God had to do was speak
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Selene Jones

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Given his very own star constellation!
You've returned to the stars, David Bowie and are forever our starman ⭐️🌟✨💫❤️
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Sun

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Gary Lite (369)

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The planets Jupiter, Neptune and Uranus all have faint rings around them. Saturn's however really stands out. It has several rings made up of ice and dust particles, with a combined diameter of 270,000 km. These rings are quite thin and therefore extremely hard to see from Earth. Its biggest and brightest ring - dubbed "B ring" - is also its most opaque, and often registers black on images taken from spacecraft, such as the one below.

http://www.369universe.com/2016/02/05/saturns-biggest-ring-sparks-new-mystory/
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Thomas Wildoner

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Early Morning Conjunction of the Moon, Venus and Mercury
Are you an early riser? If so, check out the morning sky tomorrow morning, February 6, 2016 for a great photo opportunity showing the crescent moon and the planets Venus and Mercury. Find your spot…
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Vladimir Pecha

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At an extraordinary meeting in Garching bei München, Germany on 3 February 2016, ESO’s Finance Committee authorised ESO to enter into final discussions with the winning bidder of the tender process for the design, manufacture, transport, construction, on-site assembly and verification of the Dome and Main Structure of the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT).

The discussion between ESO and the ACe Consortium, consisting of Astaldi, Cimolai and the nominated sub-contractor EIE Group will start soon, with the aim of contract signature in May 2016.
ESO, European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere
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Marilyne Chenuet's profile photoNarciso Rodrigues's profile photo
 
Je croyais qu'il y avait des problèmes avec le Brésil qui devait participer, mais qui tarde à le faire (si je ne me trompe pas de télescope...)
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Sanskar Chandra

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Do you believe what it is told about black hole in Interstellar movie
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Russell Bateman

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Live views of objects in space, from planets to nebulae! With astro images, Q&A and lively debate, come join us for our weekly hangout!

Previous Episodes: http://www.youtube.com/GlobalStarPartyLive 

Places to find us:
Twitter: https://twitter.com/globalstarparty
Google+: https://plus.google.com/+GlobalStarPartyLive

Submit Images for the Show:
https://www.flickr.com/groups/globalstarparty
This Hangout On Air is hosted by Global Star Party Live. The live video broadcast will begin soon.
Q&A
Preview
Live
Global Star Party - Southern Hemisphere / Aus / Nz edition
Tomorrow, February 6, 7:00 AM
Hangouts On Air - Broadcast for free

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SpaceTime

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...how to calculate the orbital period of the planets...
For orbital period generally we refer to the sidereal period, that is the temporal cycle that it takes an object to make a full orbit, relative to the stars. This is the orbital period in an inertial (non-rotating) frame of r...
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Richard Smith's profile photoFlordeliza Salutan's profile photo
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If it exists... Planet x = 10 - 20 000 years... 
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Vladimir Pecha

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A giant jet spanning continuously for over 300,000 light years is seen blasting out of the galaxy Pictor A

The Pictor A galaxy is one such impressive object. This galaxy, located nearly 500 million light years from Earth, contains a supermassive black hole at its center. A huge amount of gravitational energy is released as material swirls towards the event horizon, the point of no return for infalling material. This energy produces an enormous beam, or jet, of particles traveling at nearly the speed of light into intergalactic space.

To obtain images of this jet, scientists used NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory at various times over 15 years. Chandra's X-ray data (blue) have been combined with radio data from the Australia Telescope Compact Array (red) in this new composite image.

By studying the details of the structure seen in both X-rays and radio waves, scientists seek to gain a deeper understanding of these huge collimated blasts.
Information about the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which was launched on July 23, 1999, its mission and goals, and the people who built it.
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SpaceTime

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A recent simulation (Lutzgendorf et al 2016) shows that the S-stars in their present stage are not the main contributors to the accretion rate of Sgr A* and the inflow of gas from the massive O-stars (located farther from Sgr A*) is needed.

Image: X-rays from Chandra in blue and infrared emission from the Hubble Space Telescope in red and yellow. The inset shows a close-up view of Sgr A* in X-rays only, covering a region half a light year wide. The diffuse X-ray emission is from hot gas captured by the black hole and being pulled inwards. This hot gas originates from winds produced by a disk-shaped distribution of young massive stars observed in infrared observations.
Credit: X-ray: NASA/UMass/D.Wang et al., IR: NASA/STScI
Image: X-rays from Chandra in blue and infrared emission from the Hubble Space Telescope in red and yellow. The inset shows a close-up view of Sgr A* in X-rays only, covering a region half a light year wide. The diffuse X-ray...
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Rosetta's Mission is coming to an end. Here's a short resume about it!

http://www.beautyinspace.com/the-rosettas-journey/
Rosetta and Philae's adventure on the comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko is coming to an end, so here is a short resume about it, by André Florindo.
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Fred Herrmann

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A little bit of retro black and white imagery.  LBN949, a.k.a. "The Panther" is part of the emission/dark nebula known as the "Rosette" ~5,200 light-years distant in the constellation Monoceros.

http://owlmountainobservatory.com
https://www.facebook.com/OwlMountainObservatory
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Looks a bit creepy like Loki 
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An incredible gigantic kiss between two stars. Find out how this happened!

http://www.beautyinspace.com/the-monstruous-kiss-between-two-gigantic-stars/
The double star system VFTS 352 is located about 160 000 light-years away in the Tarantula Nebula. This remarkable region is the most active nursery of new stars in the nearby Universe and new observations from ESO’s VLT have revealed that this pair of young stars is among the most extreme and strangest yet found.
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