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Fred Herrmann

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NGC7293, aka “The Eye of God”, is a planetary nebula 700 light-years distant in the constellation Aquarius (Water Bearer).  The central white dwarf star is all that remains of the original star after the old red giant expelled its gasses.  The radiation of the central white dwarf continues to radiate and fluoresce the surrounding molecular cloud.  Incredible considering that the star went into its red giant phase ~10,000 years ago and now spans a diameter of almost six light-years.

Now for a little perspective:  It took mankind almost 10 years to reach the dwarf planet Pluto which is “only” 0.00079442037 light-years distant!  At this rate it would take us 875,000 years to reach NGC7293.

http://owlmountainobservatory.com 
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Rishika Meshram's profile photoMarilyne Chenuet's profile photodon gilchrist's profile photoRichard Downs's profile photo
 
Crazy to think that our sun will look something like this after its "death"!
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Hopefully, both comment threads are linked, for Science on Google+ and original post: Today I learned.
Here +Fraser Cain gives an excellent explanation of what would happen if you collided an ordinary black hole with a black hole made out of antimatter. The… - Science on Google+ - Google+
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GoToSpace

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"The Solar Influence on Tornado outbreaks"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W165uPull8Y

"This video is an introduction to the correlation that exists between tornadoes and the solar sector boundary crossings. It has been observed that tornado outbreaks increase around the days of the Earth’s crossings of the IMF sector boundaries. "
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Fred Herrmann

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Discovered by E.E. Barnard in 1881 using a 6" refractor NGC6822, aka. "Barnard's Galaxy" is a barred irregular galaxy 1.6 million light-years distant in the constellation Sagittarius (The archer).
While NGC6822 appears very similar to the dwarf Large Magellanic Cloud it's no light weight with a population in the tens of millions of stars and a diameter of 7,000 light-years.
This image also contains bubbles of star clusters similar to the Lagoon nebula within our own Milky Way galaxy.
For more images, news and science blogs visit:
http://owlmountainobservatory.com
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Chuck Boren III

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If you were in the front seat on New Horizon's flyover of Pluto on 7-14-15.
Front seat view from New Horizon as it flew over Pluto on 7-14-15 - Chuck Boren III - Google+
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Neville Morton's profile photoChris Topher's profile photoMarilyne Chenuet's profile photoROBBY FELTEAU.SR.'s profile photo
 
Stuff that dreams are made of. Next stop???
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Astrum

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A look at the top ten most interesting asteroids in our Solar System, narrated by Scott Manley!
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simon kneen

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Evidence is increasing that Galaxies are made by matter arriving around the Central Object and spiralling away in a continuous conveyance. Matter is leaving this object from the equator creating an active zone called the Torus and stars local to the Core are predominately spiralling away. This predicts a different process for Galaxy formation and can be compared to merger in the Standard Model as it produces characteristics that cannot associate. Comparing the properties of Galaxies made by merger with growth will confirm which is more applicable.

The Standard Model predicts chaotic galaxy shapes. Even a ‘sympathetic’ merger where two galaxies come harmoniously together will overlay features like spiral arms and bulges to form concentrations of stars, odd shapes and deformity. Many more mergers will be very disruptive and destructive. Growth predicts circular and symmetrical galaxies. 

Matter leaving the equator of the Central Object and forming into stars will continue that momentum creating a vast disc called the Galactic Plane. This associates to growth.

New stars forming around the Galaxy Centre will give them all a near circular orbit. The amount of very irregular or elliptical orbits will be low and incoming stars from merger will create a high percentage of elliptical orbits. The actual amount is low which is associated to growth and not to the Standard Model.

The growth process suggest that the bulge is a huge star-forming zone with matter pouring from around the Central Object forming stars that spiral across the galaxy over time. This predicts young stars will dominate the Bulge whereas the Standard Model suggests it is full of old, however, when the ages of stars are analysed they appear to be largely young. This is called the ‘paradox of youth’ and as such is impossible to related to the Standard Model.

Growth suggests an ageing process over the Galactic Plane where young stars are generally found near the centre and older are found further out. Short lived and unstable stars are almost exclusively found in the Bulge. That ageing is also true of clusters and nebula which appear to be on the same conveyance (M. Arnaud. ‘The Evolution of Galaxy Clusters Across Cosmic Time’ 2010). It is impossible for the random, chaotic, and disruptive merger processes to form a grading of star clusters in age from the Bulge.
Stars spiralling across the Galactic Plane, in growth, will gradually die as a natural ageing process eventually forming the Dark Halo as the star grave yard.

The growth process suggests a steady outward flow of matter so galaxies of a similar age will have a similar mass. Plotted on a graph their sizes will fall into a growth curve. This is called Freeman’s Law. In the Standard Model galaxies start small and randomly merge which will not result in most being of similar large size. 

None of the galaxy features here, or any others, associate directly to merger (and most cannot) while all are described by growth. 
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Rinky Lotia's profile photoMuhammad Danish Daniel's profile photoDavid Pollock's profile photo
 
Just love it 
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M Hatti

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The objects in question are a Be star named MT91 213 and a pulsar named J2032+4127 (J2032 to it's friends). A pulsar is a remnant of a supernova, a massive
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Marilyne Chenuet's profile photoVina Halabi's profile photo
 
Of what type of Pulsar is it ? A gamma, x, millisecond or other ?
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pearse mccann

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Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, studied in detail by the European Space Agency Rosetta and Philae spacecraft since September 2014, is a body with distinct and unexpected features. Now two astronomers have a radical explanation for its properties - micro-organisms that shape cometary activity.
Comet 67P/Churyumov--Gerasimenko, studied in detail by the European Space Agency Rosetta and Philae spacecraft since September 2014, is a body with distinct and unexpected features. Now two astronomers have a radical explanation for its properties -- micro-organisms that shape cometary activity.
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pearse mccann

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A team of astronomers announced the discovery of a ring of rocks circling a very young star. This is the first time these 'pebbles', thought to be a crucial link in building planets, have been detected.
A team of astronomers announced the discovery of a ring of rocks circling a very young star. This is the first time these 'pebbles', thought to be a crucial link in building planets, have been detected.
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David Carlson's profile photoMarilyne Chenuet's profile photoJoseph Jakobowski's profile photoMuhammad Danish Daniel's profile photo
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Using the term 'pebbles' gives the mistaken impression that we're seeing rocky silicates, but in reality, the radio telescope used can only measure the size of the little hard things, so it can't distinguish between silicate chondrules and icy hailstones (and my money's on icy hailstones).

Secondly, 'core accretion' as a planet formation mechanism is not settled science, so a disclaimer is needed.  We still don't know how planets form!  And actually, core accretion was falsified by the discovery of hot Jupiters, so scientists appended the ad hoc secondary mechanism of 'planet migration' to keep their pet theory on life support.
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M Hatti

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APOD - The Whirlpool Galaxy
#space #deepspace #nasa #galaxy #whirlpool
Astronomy Picture of the Day: The Whirlpool Galaxy, the iconic image of a Galaxy.
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don gilchrist's profile photoRegina Dickerson's profile photomatthew holtz's profile photoEric Bright's profile photo
 
開心的訊息!地球人有無數個星際家人!哈哈笑!😄😄😄
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Joanna Wang

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You all know what's so sad? While Pluto was still classified as a planet, it never made a full trip around the sun.  :(
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+Michael Hambright haha lol
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Oscar Rivera

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Interested in studying physics or astronomy?
#Astronomy #Physics
If you're thinking of applying to study physics and astronomy, check out which UK universities offer the best degrees
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M Hatti

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Desperately seeking geeks outside our planet. #seti #alien #intelligent #life #extraterrestrial #et
The search for intelligent life gets a new financial boos from Russian Billionaire Yuri Milner.
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I agree
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Pluto. Shahking before and after photos!
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Thanks
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Matthew Smith

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Very interesting!
 
A glimpse into the heart of a dying star



This image, taken with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, shows the young planetary nebula Henize 3-401. Hubble's extraordinary vision reveals that it is one of the most elongated planetary nebulae found so far. The image shows two very long cylindrical outflows with intricate thread-like structures and tattered ends. We are seeing the central star responsible for the beautiful display for the first time in this image. Henize 3-401 is located in the constellation of Carina (the Keel) at an approximate distance of 10 000 light-years. This picture is composed of three exposures obtained with Hubble's Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 on 12 June 1997. The three exposures were taken through a wide orange filter (1200 seconds) shown in blue, a hydrogen-alpha filter (400 seconds) shown in red, and a singly ionised sulphur filter (1200 seconds) shown in green.

Credit:

European Space Agency and Pedro Garcma-Lario (ESA ISO Data Centre)


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Fred Herrmann

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NGC6015 is a spiral galaxy in the constellation Draco (Dragon) at a distance of 38 million light-years.  With a surface brightness of 11.7 it is billions of times dimmer than the brightest stars of the night sky.  http://owlmountainobservatory.com 
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Matthew Smith

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Here are five facts about NASA's twin Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft.
Here are five facts about NASA's twin Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft.
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pearse mccann

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Astronomers have found evidence for a large population of hidden supermassive black holes in the Universe.
Astronomers have found evidence for a large population of hidden supermassive black holes in the Universe.
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