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Chuck Boren III

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This is a sight you shouldn't miss.
Two days to go for this unique site, 3.5 day old Moon, Venus and Aldebaran on 4-21-15 @ 9:00 PM local time. - Chuck Boren III - Google+
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Jason Higley
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Space telescopes may one day make use of glitter-like materials to help take images of new worlds, according to JPL researchers.
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Our home star has a seasonal cycle that lasts almost exactly one Earth year
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Sun?
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ALMA sees Einstein ring in stunning image of lensed galaxy

Astronomers have discovered that a distant galaxy—seen from Earth with the aid of a gravitational lens—appears like a cosmic ring, thanks to the highest resolution images ever taken with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA).

Link: http://www.sciencehook.com/hook.php?entryID=345
Astronomers have discovered that a distant galaxy—seen from Earth with the aid of a gravitational lens—appears like a cosmic ring, thanks to the highest resolution images ever taken with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA).
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Jason Higley
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On Dec. 19, 2006, the sun ejected a slow puff of material that ripped oxygen from Venus' atmosphere, sending it out into space to be lost forever.
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Matthew Smith

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Astronomy Picture of the Day

2015 April 10

NGC 2903: A Missing Jewel in Leo

Image Credit & Copyright: Tony Hallas

http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap150410.html

Barred spiral galaxy NGC 2903 is only some 20 million light-years distant. Popular among amateur astronomers, it shines in the northern spring constellation Leo, near the top of the lion's head. That part of the constellation is sometimes seen as a reversed question mark or sickle. One of the brighter galaxies visible from the northern hemisphere, NGC 2903 is surprisingly missing from Charles Messier's catalog of lustrous celestial sights. This colorful image from a small ground-based telescope shows off the galaxy's gorgeous spiral arms traced by young, blue star clusters and pinkish star forming regions. Included are intriguing details of NGC 2903's bright core, a remarkable mix of old and young clusters with immense dust and gas clouds. In fact, NGC 2903 exhibits an exceptional rate of star formation activity near its center, also bright in radio, infrared, ultraviolet, and x-ray bands. Just a little smaller than our own Milky Way, NGC 2903 is about 80,000 light-years across.
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Amazing....
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P Grimm

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Maybe of interest to some. 
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Pieter allen Master Blue's profile photoPatrick “Patman” Festa's profile photodon gilchrist's profile photoMarilyne Chenuet's profile photo
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+P Grimm Not really I know of the one orbiting satellite, no way you could call it a moon just a big rock, the rest are just the same but smaller   
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Two massive bodies hit Earth and Mercury 4.5 billion years ago.

I suspect Planet X hit about 25 lat degrees above the south pole and tilted earth 23.5 degrees off plane. The rubble settled into the earth and moon. Or did it go further out to Venus? Or Mars? By examination of Venus and Mars they can tell if the rubble is from the Planet X that hit earth. 

The head on collision of Mercury may have thrown the rubble into the sun or away from the sun or part both. It depends upon how the planet xx was attracted to the sun. The collision sent Mercury into eclipse and remains today. Where is the rubble ?. The ellipse also can help tell about the collision angles and positions of both planets at time of collision.

Why did two planets get thrown into the sun to collide with earth and Mercury??
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+Shawn Munger got any objections to hypotheses? It's a normal part of the scientific method.
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Jason Higley
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"A crucial difference in the “fingerprints” of Earth and the moon confirms an explosive, interconnected past..."
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when we talk about the fate of our universe we often consider black holes which can pull all the fabric of spacetime and matter in it but why not we think the other most likely possibility about the end of our universe,hubble has indicated that our universe is expanding at a very brisk rate ---that means the force responsible called dark energy can stretch and completely tear apart the fabric of spacetime and all the matter in it will eventually get completely lost?
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+Mycll d.D probably but we just don't know. 
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Jason Higley
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NGC 6388: White Dwarf May Have Shredded Passing Planet
Information about the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which was launched on July 23, 1999, its mission and goals, and the people who built it.
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GoToSpace

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 Plasma Filaments, Sunspot Classification | GoToSpace - April 18, 2015

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mdl1yIiohTs&feature=youtu.be
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Matthew Smith

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It's a big assed universe and they have barely scratched the surface!
It's a matter of imminent probabilities as life finds a way!
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 No Type III civilizations with Dyson Shells/Spheres/Swarms etc. within 100,000 galaxies only means that in (this small sample of) galaxies no civilizations in the sample are enclosing their stars with collectors.  I can think of a number of reasons why civilizations wouldn't, shouldn't and couldn't do that.  As with the dozens of reasons why the so-called Fermi Paradox is not a paradox, showing that there are no Type III's obviously blocking light on a galaxy wide scale only proves one thing, in the sample Type III civiilizations (if any) don't want to block all the light of their stars and may have other means of energy production or are energy efficient enough to use only incident solar energy, or nuclear, or hydro, or wind, or fusion power etc., and that they do not increase in population to infest a system enough to block the light of the star.  There will be other factors too, most importantly (IMO) extinction events due to gamma ray bursts, pandemics, negative interactions with other species, machine technology propagation/competition, inability to adapt to new environmental situations, inability to control Dyson Swarm orbits safely, conservation efforts to not modify stellar environments, anti-colonization efforts, religion-inspired apocalypses and monocultures of ignorance/anti-science/anti-exploration/anti-expansion, economic/resource incapacity (converting a Jupiter into Dyson sphere/swarm material is very easy to say in a 1960 science paper, but no one has ever come up with a practical engineering solution that says how such a thing could actually be accomplished).  The premise of Type III's harnessing all the starlight of a galaxy is based on a science-fiction notion that has no proposed solution to the engineering problems that would need to be solved in order to do such a thing, and is based on a fantasy concept that might never be adopted by a civilization that could actually execute such a task (just because a civilization could do something, doesn't mean that they should do something).  Example, we could build microwave energy stations to beam collected solar energy from Earth orbit to Earth's surface, but the excess heat load would eventually make Earth un-inhabitable in the long term (i.e. every thing one does has ramifications/side-effects, maybe the negative side effects of intercepting all of a galaxy's starlight is the reason why it isn't done?)  Maybe some civilizations don't like other civilizations blocking out the light?  Maybe none has arisen to that level of technology?  There are dozens, perhaps hundreds of reasons one could come up with for explaining the negative result (i.e. it really doesn't put a constraint on the number of civilizations at all.)
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Jason Higley
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ESO, European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere
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Sometimes you have to stop and look, at 9:00 pm local time on 4-21-15 the Moon, Venus and the bright star Aldebaran meet in the western sky.
If you have a clear sky on 4/21/15 go out @ 9:00 pm local time and find a flat unobstructed horizon to see a 3.5 day old Moon sitting just above the star… - Chuck Boren III - Google+
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Sorry for the typo on this header. The date is 4-21-15 not 4-12-15!
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Jason Higley
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Tomorrow is Explore the Universe Day at our Museum in Washington, DC. Join us from 10am to 3pm to learn about accomplishments in astronomical observing from Galileo to Hubble and discover how different cultures see the sky. More information on presentations, hands-on activities, and other activities: http://bit.ly/1edJYNb

#HeritageDays
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Astronomers compiled a story of our Milky Way's growth by studying galaxies similar in mass to our galaxy, found in deep surveys of the universe. Stretching back more than 10 billion years, the census contains nearly 2,000 snapshots of Milky Way-like galaxies.
Astronomers compiled a story of our Milky Way's growth by studying galaxies similar in mass to our galaxy, found in deep surveys of the universe. Stretching back more than 10 billion years, the census contains nearly 2,000 snapshots of Milky Way-like galaxies.
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Super picture 
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Oldest Star In The Universe Or Actually Older Than The Universe? How Can That Be? The Universe Is 13.8 Billion Years Old And HD 140283 (Methuselah Star) Is 14.5 Billion Years Old. ?????????
http://phys.org/news/2013-03-hubble-birth-certificate-oldest-star.html
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+Mycll d.D Thank u.This discussion made this time space issue clearer to me.
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Jason Higley
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A podcast on it there too.
Simulations show that Earth probably collided with an unnervingly similar sister planet to form our lunar neighbour.
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Excellent!
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