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Fred Herrmann

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Globular Cluster NGC3201 in Sky and Telescope Magazine, September 2014.
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James Ablorh's profile photo
 
Good
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Jason Higley
moderator

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If you go to google maps (link below), you can zoom out to space like this vista (screen-captured from google maps), and rotate the Earth by grabbing it; see how the dark side looks with a real light pollution map, and those stars in the background are the real backdrop of our Milky Way galaxy, oriented the way it really is in space.  Also, the terminator line (the light and dark line which marks sunrise and sunset) should be set to your local time (i.e. real time) and you can even see the Sun if you rotate Earth to the dark side.  Here's the link to the location shown in the image below
https://www.google.com/maps/@31.1877437,100.6550599,22998273m/data=!3m1!1e3

So grab the Earth with your mouse and see a little bit of the Universe around us.  Have fun!!!
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Bruce Holloway's profile photoMarilyne Chenuet's profile photoAllan Mzule's profile photo
6 comments
 
Marvelous! I hardly could located my native village on the Usambara mountains northen Tanzania, love it.
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Jason Higley
moderator

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"Radio-burst discovery deepens astrophysics mystery - Newly detected short radio pulse appears to come from far beyond our galaxy"
July 10, 2014
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There are billions of stars and planets in the universe. The planets are formed in dust clouds that swirled around a newly formed star. But where does the cosmic dust come from? New research shows that not only can grains of dust form in gigantic supernova explosions, they can also survive the subsequent shockwaves they are exposed to.
There are billions of stars and planets in the universe. The planets are formed in dust clouds that swirled around a newly formed star. But where does the cosmic dust come from? New research shows that not only can grains of dust form in gigantic supernova explosions, they can also survive the subsequent shockwaves they are exposed to.
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P Grimm
 
How dust (matter) forms from pure energy is the reason for solving the Higgs Bosan question. 
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These are all the dwarf planets in our solar system
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Adam Synergy's profile photoCrystal Clendenon's profile photoKevin Bradley's profile photo
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Thanks adam
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pearse mccann

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New research has solved a long-standing mystery surrounding the evolution of galaxies, deepening our understanding of the future of the Milky Way. The supermassive black holes in the cores of some galaxies drive massive outflows of molecular hydrogen gas. As a result, most of the cold gas is expelled from the galaxies. Since cold gas is required to form new stars, this directly affects the galaxies' evolution.
New research has solved a long-standing mystery surrounding the evolution of galaxies, deepening our understanding of the future of the Milky Way. The supermassive black holes in the cores of some galaxies drive massive outflows of molecular hydrogen gas. As a result, most of the cold gas is expelled from the galaxies. Since cold gas is required to form new stars, this directly affects the galaxies' evolution.
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Marilyne Chenuet's profile photoArunas Norvaisas's profile photo
 
And then once charged with positive energy it  get visible for us and make our matter
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Jason Higley
moderator

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The sun emitted a mid-level solar flare, peaking at 12:20 p.m. EDT on July 8, 2014, and NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory captured images.
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Darius McCoy's profile photochristopher moran's profile photo
 
Real Nice NASA IS TO COOL !
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The Galactic #Fireworks
The #4thofJuly fireworks was on full display few days ago but it seems #Sun has been flaring off its own fireworks. #flares

Follow Spectacular Sun at Intellects
Two active regions with their intense magnetic fields produced towering arches and spiraling coils of solar loops above them (June 29 - July 1, 2014) as… - NASA - Google+
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Anuradha Verginie's profile photo
 
oh   what   a    wonderful   thing    that   i    never   see
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Todd William

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“At the heart of science is an essential balance between two seemingly contradictory attitudes–an openness to new ideas, no matter how bizarre or counter-intuitive they may be, and the most ruthless skeptical scrutiny of all ideas, old and new. This is how deep truths are winnowed from deep nonsense.” ~ Carl Sagan
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ckayamboovannan kayamboo's profile photoFaizan Sarfaraz's profile phototrellia llewellyn's profile photo
3 comments
 
LOL
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Jason Higley
moderator

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The National Radio Astronomy Observatory announced that SETI Institute's Dr. Jill Tarter has been selected to present the 49th annual Jansky Lecture. Jill is being honored for her role in pioneering methods for searching for extraterrestrial intelligence using radio techniques, as well as her leadership in the emerging field of astrobiology.

The Karl G. Jansky Lectureship is an honor established by the trustees of Associated Universities, Inc., to recognize outstanding contributions to the advancement of astronomy. Congratulations, Dr. Tarter!

Learn more here: http://buff.ly/1xDrFGT
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Manuel Rodriguez Paz's profile photoNat Ram's profile photo
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Intellects

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#Space Junk or Flaming Plane?
Even space junk glows like a star . Few people in Australia observed something unique , a glowing figure moving across in dark skies, some thought it was plane on flames while others wondered what it was.#spacejunk

Following stars in skies and beyond at Intellects
"It first looked like a plane with fire coming out of the tail." -- Aaron O. "I have never seen anything like it. Big, bright and moving gently across sky - slower than a plane, not falling at all but moving across." -- Shannon H. "Viewed from cockpit of aircraft at 37,000'. Was visible for two…
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Jason Higley
moderator

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Astronomers discover 7 new Dwarf Galaxies in the direction of the Pinwheel Galaxy (M 101) using a new Telescope

"Meet the seven new dwarf galaxies. Yale University astronomers, using a new type of telescope made by stitching together telephoto lenses, recently discovered seven celestial surprises while probing a nearby spiral galaxy. The previously unseen galaxies may yield important insights into dark matter and galaxy evolution, while possibly signaling the discovery of a new class of objects in space.

For now, scientists know they have found a septuplet of new galaxies that were previously overlooked because of their diffuse nature: The ghostly galaxies emerged from the night sky as the team obtained the first observations from the "homemade" telescope.

The discovery came quickly, in a relatively small section of sky. "We got an exciting result in our first images," said Allison Merritt, a Yale graduate student and lead author of a paper about the discovery in the Astrophysical Journal Letters. "It was very exciting. It speaks to the quality of the telescope.""

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2014-07-astronomers-dwarf-galaxies-telescope.html#jCp

Image: This image shows the field of view from the Dragonfly Telephoto Array, centered on M101. Inset images highlight the seven new galaxies. Credit: Yale University
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Anthony Baez's profile photoMike Cavaroc's profile photoPaulina Mloka's profile photo
2 comments
 
Cool
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Jason Higley
moderator

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"This simulated image demonstrates how small the Milky Way would look from the location of ULAS J0744+25, nearly 775,000 light years away."  (but is still a part of our galaxy.)
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Anil Kumar

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He great red spot is the largest storm of the solar system that can engulf 3 earths...
 
The Great Red Spot Puzzling Astronomers for more than 400 Years
The Great Red Spot of Jupiter
captured by Voyager 1 in 1979. (Credit: NASA ) The Great Red Spot (GRS) is
an anticyclonic atmospheric storm which is present in the southern hemisphere
of   Jupiter .
Since it is an anticyclonic, it is a high pressure storm op...
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In theory the big bang is a explosion right so it keeps exploding until it loses momentum which is hard in space then it will collapse killing us and explode again and so on this is called the expand and contract theory
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harry robinson's profile photobudder leader's profile photo
16 comments
 
the stuff we are made of is a very small percent of the univurse
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The Emerging Art of Video Astronomy, Part 3

In this third installment, you look at the key settings for an astronomy video camera, and you get a few tips to help you take your first image. 

The video in this installment was made with images from a Mallincam Extreme video camera and a 6" VRC astrograph.

Read more at: http://oneminuteastronomer.com/10206/video-astronomy-guide-3
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Astronomers investigating the behavior of the universe shortly after the Big Bang have made a surprising discovery: the properties of the early universe are determined by the smallest galaxies.
Astronomers investigating the behavior of the universe shortly after the Big Bang have made a surprising discovery: the properties of the early universe are determined by the smallest galaxies.
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Cosmic Journeys - Is the Universe Infinite?

Explore the biggest question of all. How far do the stars stretch out into space? And what's beyond them? In modern times, we built giant telescopes that have allowed us to cast our gaze deep into the universe. Astronomers have been able to look back to near the time of its birth. They've reconstructed the course of cosmic history in astonishing detail.

From intensive computer modeling, and myriad close observations, they've uncovered important clues to its ongoing evolution. Many now conclude that what we can see, the stars and galaxies that stretch out to the limits of our vision, represent only a small fraction of all there is. 

Does the universe go on forever? Where do we fit within it? And how would the great thinkers have wrapped their brains around the far-out ideas on today's cutting edge? 

For those who find infinity hard to grasp, even troubling, you're not alone. It's a concept that has long tormented even the best minds.

Over two thousand years ago, the Greek mathematician Pythagoras and his followers saw numerical relationships as the key to understanding the world around them. 

But in their investigation of geometric shapes, they discovered that some important ratios could not be expressed in simple numbers.

Take the circumference of a circle to its diameter, called Pi. 

Computer scientists recently calculated Pi to 5 trillion digits, confirming what the Greeks learned: there are no repeating patterns and no ending in sight.

The discovery of the so-called irrational numbers like Pi was so disturbing, legend has it, that one member of the Pythagorian cult, Hippassus, was drowned at sea for divulging their existence. 

A century later, the philosopher Zeno brought infinity into the open with a series of paradoxes: situations that are true, but strongly counter-intuitive.

In this modern update of one of Zeno's paradoxes, say you have arrived at an intersection. But you are only allowed to cross the street in increments of half the distance to the other side. So to cross this finite distance, you must take an infinite number of steps.

In math today, it's a given that you can subdivide any length an infinite number of times, or find an infinity of points along a line. 

What made the idea of infinity so troubling to the Greeks is that it clashed with their goal of using numbers to explain the workings of the real world.

To the philosopher Aristotle, a century after Zeno, infinity evoked the formless chaos from which the world was thought to have emerged: a primordial state with no natural laws or limits, devoid of all form and content.

But if the universe is finite, what would happen if a warrior traveled to the edge and tossed a spear? Where would it go? 

It would not fly off on an infinite journey, Aristotle said. Rather, it would join the motion of the stars in a crystalline sphere that encircled the Earth. To preserve the idea of a limited universe, Aristotle would craft an historic distinction.

On the one hand, Aristotle pointed to the irrational numbers such as Pi. Each new calculation results in an additional digit, but the final, final number in the string can never be specified. So Aristotle called it "potentially" infinite. 

Then there's the "actually infinite," like the total number of points or subdivisions along a line. It's literally uncountable. Aristotle reserved the status of "actually infinite" for the so-called "prime mover" that created the world and is beyond our capacity to understand. This became the basis for what's called the Cosmological, or First Cause, argument for the existence of God.

By Space Rip

Length: 24 mins
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Michael Cannon's profile photoDivinagracia Esmero's profile photoKurdistan Planetarium's profile photoRitesh Gupta's profile photo
3 comments
 
I know everything sir but in a physics   language what we say   
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A cosmic mystery is arising after a cherry tree grown from a seed that orbited the Earth(in International Space Station) for eight months bloomed years EARLIER than expected -- and with very surprising flowers !!
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Kuldip Sahota's profile photoLeopold Port's profile photoMarilyne Chenuet's profile photoPieter allen Master Blue's profile photo
6 comments
 
+Marilyne Chenuet  Well maybe not, who knows
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The distance of galaxies form the earth is so large that no telescope can detect any observable change in position then how can we measure speed of galaxy?
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