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Banff Aurora

Paul: "Here in Banff National Park we rarely get the big Northern Lights displays they get at the high latitudes. If you're patient though, once-in-a-while you'll get to shoot the aurora over some of the most stunning landscapes on the planet!"

"Aurora borealis over iconic Mount Rundle, Vermillion Lakes, Banff National Park."

Banff National Park
www.pc.gc.ca/eng/pn-np/ab/banff/index.aspx

Credit: Paul Zizka
Release Date: April 23, 2017
Location: Mount Rundle, Vermillion Lakes, Banff National Park, Alberta, Canada

+Paul Zizka
+Paul Zizka Photography

#Earth #Astronomy #Space #Science #Planet #Aurora #Borealis #NorthernLights #MountRundle #VermillionLakes #Banff #Alberta #Canada #ExploreCanada #Photography #Astrophotography #Art #STEM #Education
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Why are we posting this pic of Saturn on #EarthDay? See that bright dot? That’s our home planet as seen by the Cassini spacecraft! Take a closer look: http://go.nasa.gov/2oA29Tt
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Great observatories composite

Composite of images of the active galaxy Messier 82 from the three Great Observatories: Hubble Space Telescope, Chandra X-Ray Observatory, and Spitzer Space Telescope. X-ray data recorded by Chandra appears here in blue, infrared light recorded by Spitzer appears in red. Hubble's observation of hydrogen emission appears in orange. Hubble's bluest observation appears in yellow-green.

Credit:

NASA, ESA, CXC, and JPL-Caltech
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“Wormholes in fact are such weird shortcuts that bridge extreme distances of the range of many light years and make journey possible in few hours.”
https://niume.com/post/309639


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Earth seen between the rings of Saturn gives us perspective on the vast space in our solar system. Our home planet is a point of light between the icy rings when seen by our Cassini spacecraft at this distance of 870 million miles from Earth. More: http://go.nasa.gov/2oAeo24 #EarthDay
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In the early 1990s, scientists felt one thing was fairly certain about the expansion of the universe: The amount of energy density inside it was enough to stop the expansion and cause the universe to re-collapse, or, there was not enough energy density inside the universe to ever stop its expansion, but the gravity would certainly slow down the expansion gradually. However, when Hubble Space Telescope (HST) came with observations of distant supernovae in 1998, scientists were left dumbfounded at what they saw. The observations actually showed that the expansion of the universe had increased over time, instead of decreasing as was believed to be the case.

No one was able to provide a definite explanation for this, and though we still don't know what the correct explanation is, the most accepted hypothesis for this was that there exists an unknown form of energy that occupies the universe. The cause behind the constantly increasing expansion of the universe. This unknown form of energy was given a name: Dark Energy. Dark energy was similar to Einstein's proposed 'cosmological constant' in his early theory of general relativity.

This form of energy is thought to be very homogeneous, not very dense, and it is not even known to interact with any of the fundamental forces other than gravity. It is quite rarefied, however the reason it still has such an acute impact on the universe is that it uniformly fills up the empty space in the universe, making up 68% of the universe's density. To cause the effects it does, dark energy must also have a strong negative pressure, acting repulsively. This accelerating expansion effect is often called 'gravitational repulsion'.

Skepticism to this theory, of course, still exists, and there are many other theories attempting to explain the universe's expansion. Either way, it all makes us wonder how vast the universe really is. We may never unravel all its mysteries, but being a curious being, we'll keep trying and trying.

Sources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dark_energy#Implications_for_the_fate_of_the_universe
https://science.nasa.gov/astrophysics/focus-areas/what-is-dark-energy

#science #sciencegeeks #astronomy #astrophysics #physics #DarkEnergy #universe
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Storms from the sun can affect our power grids, railway systems and underground pipelines through a phenomenon called geomagnetically induced currents. That’s why we're working with other federal agencies and the power and insurance industries to develop plans and standards for dealing with this type of space weather. Learn more: https://go.nasa.gov/2onTwMt
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New warning signs for supernovae discovered - SpaceTime with Stuart Gary S20E29 YouTube Edition...enjoy!

#astronomy #space #astrophysics +audioBoom +NASA
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