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I've enjoyed two days of training managers around difficult conversations made easier. Fascinating to see differences between managers in terms of what is / isn't a difficult issue. Also interesting to help reframe participants' views from just wanting to remove the issue they find hard to creating a space that develops a planned solution. Training is always fun, and always a learning place for me too.
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To help managers deal with a constant difficult conversation we've produced another Think Paper, this time it is focused upon DIFFUSING PERSONALITY CLASHES. You can download this short paper with its information and suggested approach to reducing personality clashes at work for FREE at: http://knowanddo.com/archives/2284
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Categorisation of disagreement - a handy "maslows" guide
Interesting: Paul Graham (+YCombinator co-founder) has a "Hierarchy of Disagreement," helpful to make these explicit and ranked.  If you disagree that this is a valid categorization and ranking, this paradigm asks that you explicitly refute the central point!

The process of taking all these ways of communicating, which fit into a general category, ranking them, displaying them like this, it's all really interesting.  Shared by +Chris Dixon on Twitter.
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Interesting article from Harvard Business Review focusing on how managers can CHOOSE to respond to a person they are responsible for at work but do not like

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Interesting link to wide range of tips on difficult conversations @ work
Don’t ignore the difficult issues to seal a deal.

In negotiations, it is worthwhile to confront the difficult issues, rather than ignoring or minimizing them to seal the deal. Read more tips about negotiations. http://bit.ly/10W3TrA
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Very good article with some quick, simple tips to improve one's ability to initiate difficult conversations at work

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+Andrew Ramwell has just published another THINK PAPER, the first in our series on Difficult Conversations. In this short PDF article Andrew outlines in a four step process how manager can turn a tough conversation with staff member into the RIGHT conversation!

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I'm currently writing a short Think Paper on communication in the workplace for our series of free resources my colleagues and I will be sharing shortly on 'Difficult Conversations' in our online business library: http://knowanddo.com/resources

I was re-watching this short video clip from The Office for ideas. It seems a perfect masterclass in how NOT to conduct a staff appraisal. Keith's complete disinterest in excruciatingly funny to watch in a sit-com; in real life it can be exhausting to manage someone with that little enthusiasm. David Brent, as the manager, re-enforces all the negatives by his actions before and during the appraisal. He seems to have lost the respect of Keith and certainly there is no trust, so why should the employee be honest and participate? Have you ever felt frustrated as an employee in Keith's position or a manager conducting a one-to-one meeting? How have you broken the negative cycle and started to rebuild trust?

This community space has just been formed to help managers who need to have difficult conversations in the workplace turn these experiences into the RIGHT conversations. More posts, ideas and questions will follow soon!
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