Stream

Join this community to post or comment
Pinned by moderator

David Coulter
moderator

++READ ME FIRST++  - 
 
Read Before Posting

Posts in this community must meet 3 simple requirements:

1. You need to present a debatable motion or question

2. You need to present your position on the topic

3. You need to provide support for your position (namely in the form of evidence or logic) Note: links to websites may be used as supporting evidence, but members must not be required to follow the link; you must (at very least) provide a synopsis of the information presented in the link. 

For additional rules and guidelines, please review the +READ ME FIRST++ section found here:
https://plus.google.com/communities/109258339361995823601/stream/088d8cae-e312-4e92-b742-16a23b13db9e

Thanks, and enjoy!
184
20

Aman Mourya

General Debate  - 
 
http://www.jeevikami.com/stop-comparing-yourself/
Do we need to stop comparing ourselves to others or upto certain extent it is good to compare ourselves?
5
Aman Mourya's profile photo
8 comments
 
If someone is badly suffering from this habits.. what all tips you would like to give him to stop this habit?
Add a comment...

Google Minus

Ethics & morality  - 
 
Scared Straight teaches people that torturing children makes them a better person within span of a week. Don't blame the child because they misbehave. The parents failed as parents. Mental, emotional, and physical abuse are all against the law unless you're above the law.
34 votes  -  votes visible to Public
Agreed
62%
Disagreed
38%
6
MS An Thrope's profile photoMary L's profile photo
30 comments
Mary L
 
Is this becoming an argument about a tv programme?
Add a comment...

Mary L
moderator

Ethics & morality  - 
 
Should we steer clear of businesses like this?

http://news.sky.com/story/sports-direct-working-conditions-appalling-10508933

When I first saw this report, I told myself that I would never shop at Sports Direct again. However, last week I wanted a new pair of trainers, and Sports Direct sold the cheapest and best value for money pair I could find - and all I could afford - so I bought them. Morally, I would say keep away from businesses that so obviously exploit their workers, but realistically, there are times when I just can’t afford to.
The report says working practices at Sports Direct are "closer to that of a Victorian workhouse than that of a modern retailer".
4
Ken Johnson's profile photoMary L's profile photo
8 comments
Mary L
 
+Ken Johnson I assume that's sarcasm on your part, and not total lack of awareness. In either case, Ken, it seems pretty ignorant:-)
Add a comment...

David Upton

Religion  - 
 
Can anyone foresee religion dying out on this planet in the next 20 to 30 years?
It's probably much harder to believe Islam will die out before Christianity because at the moment the Arab and Muslim worlds are all consumed with it (was reading a recent survey where only about 6% of these peoples were non religious).
The fact that Christianity is more prevalent in the western world where greater privilege and freedom from religious conflict occurs, people can appreciate development and scientific breakthroughs more, and as result religion becomes less relevant.
My position is that I think religions plural can at least level off significantly in a generation and a half because newborns the world over come into a world we at present can't appreciate that will address world problems so strongly to rescue the planet from destruction. From this I believe the art of worshiping a figure or God with no evidence to support it will become low to nil priority. Even people born into Muslim societies will present with a fresh consciousness about reality and see that their religion has caused so much needless tragedy.
Christians are already questioning the logic about beliefs stronger than ever.
To back up this notion, I can say that of all the people i speak to about religion and I do because it is a deep interest of mine, people in the OLD bracket are the most religious minded, MIDDLE aged a little less, 30-50 YEAR OLDS include the most 'doubtfuls' and the YOUNGER SET most definitely the least religious.
What do you think?
6
Shookla A's profile photoJason Reynolds's profile photo
49 comments
 
+Shookla A
I can agree with that, but the post seems to be saying that religion will completely die out
Add a comment...

James Brown

Politics and Public Policy  - 
 
Does is actually make sense for every young American to go to college anymore? Given the cost of getting an education, many are now better off getting a trade skill of some kind. In 2014, 2/3 of American students dropped out of university, and yet many people want to offer education for all. I personally need a high pass right than that, and I need to know we're sending people to college to get marketable skills that will get them decent jobs, before I can support shelling out more in taxes. Your thoughts?

http://usnewsandyou.siterubix.com/why-should-everyone-go-to-college/
5
Add a comment...
4 comments

Shilvio D. Linton

Ethics & morality  - 
 
Motion: There be consequences for scholars [professors and/or students] who who use offensive speech on campuses.

Position: scholars should be able to be as offensive or crass if they are doing it in the pursuit of knowledge. If there are consequences imposed by the administration it can retard individuals learning of higher order morality. 
5
Shilvio D. Linton's profile photoEric Mueller's profile photo
23 comments
 
+Shilvio D. Linton I'd recommend checking it out. When I started getting into Asian philosophy it was a mind-altering experience. Not that it would be the same for everyone, just saying it changed the way I approached things. Don't know if other people consider that "deepity" or not, don't much care.
Add a comment...

James Brown

General Debate  - 
 
Libertarians have often been a fringe party in American attention. But, the circus show that is the Republican and Democratic Parties this year has given Americans more incentive than ever to look elsewhere, and Libertarians appear to be best positioned to fill that void. A Libertarian presidential win would be nothing short of a miracle. But, is this the year in which they move from the outskirts of the political battlefield and into the fray?

http://usnewsandyou.siterubix.com/why-should-i-vote-libertarian/
2
Add a comment...

Mary L
moderator

General Debate  - 
 
Should overeating be shamed in the same way that cigarettes have been?

Overeating can lead to obesity and many health problems - diabetes, heart conditions, etc. In many areas, society tries hard to accommodate people who overeat, for example through providing wider seating on public transport. It can be difficult to maintain a healthy diet, while ready-made and sugary foods are so easily available.

However, the problems caused to users and society by addiction to smoking during the ‘70s and ‘80s were successfully dealt with - mainly through raising the prices of cigarettes, but also by emphasising the health risks involved, and not allowing people to smoke in certain areas. While I appreciate that it would be ludicrous to suggest that food prices be raised, I do think that more can be done to emphasise the dangers - and “shame” the use of fast-food outlets and sugary snacks. I think that society works too hard to accommodate the needs of people who overeat, and does too little to discourage the activity.
5
1
Stephen Mac's profile photoMary L's profile photo
83 comments
Mary L
 
+Stephen Mac 
+Larry Pepper 
Thanks:-)
Add a comment...
 
The medieval bubonic plague epidemics both decimated much of Europe and spurred the spread of literacy and Christianity in Europe. Illiteracy, superstition and occultism were rampant in mostly agrarian medieval Europe. Fear that this "scourge" was God's wrath sent terrified hordes flocking to the church.

However, only aristocrats and church officials were literate and the benighted needed to become also literate to read scripture. When they became literate literacy and Christianity spread throughout Europe. (Source: "Superstitions: The Book of Ancient Lore" by Peter Lorie.) This flourishing literacy lead to the Renaissance period.

Without the medieval plague epidemics the Renaissance period might have been delayed. Europe would have had arrested development and the Middle Ages (or Dark Ages) would have been prolonged. This would have delayed the inspiration and potential of many inventors, scientists, artists, musicians, writers, philosophers, etc for ages.

So Europe might have produced an illiterate Galileo, an illiterate Rembrandt, an illiterate Ferdinand Magellan, an illiterate Johannes Gutenberg, an illiterate William Shakespeare, an illiterate Francis Bacon, an illiterate Johann Sebastian Bach, etc if the arrested development lasted long enough.

So, is something horrible with great benefits such as the bubonic plague actually good, a "blessing in disguise"?

I tend to think of a catalyst for positive change whether it's pleasant (good) or unpleasant (bad) as being ultimately good. The bubonic plague was bad (harmful or fatal) for its victims, but it was beneficial (good) for European literacy, which was ultimately good for Europe's development, and Christianity. 
The disastrous mortal disease known as the Black Death spread across Europe in the years 1346-53. The frightening name, however, only came several centuries after its visitation (and was probably a mistranslation of the Latin word ‘atra’ meaning both ‘terrible’ and ‘black)’. Chronicles and letters from the time describe the terror wrought by the illness. In Florence, the great Renaissance poet Petrarch was sure that they would not be believed: ‘O...
4
1
Safa Mubarak's profile photoApt215 Melissa Brown's profile photo
7 comments
 
It needn't be described as a blessing in disguise, because other words can convey the point more accurately, such as "catalyst." It was a catalyst for literacy due to . . ."research" or "more bible reading" etc. So, it need not be viewed in terms of good v. bad unless you want to inject a moral lesson.
Add a comment...

About this community

Please Read the Category labeled "++READ ME FIRST++" before posting. GLOBAL | ENDURING | IMPORTANT | SERIOUS | FUN | DEBATE Violence, climate change, religion, piracy, pornography, the 1%, the bottom billion, liberty, equality ... Every day the big questions that shape our world are played out in the news. And +Versus is where we can come together to try to make sense of it all by threshing it out.

James Brown

General Debate  - 
 
Could Texas, or any other state, actually leave the union successfully? The YES vote on Brexit seems to have reignited a very small, but very vocal, number of individuals to push for their state's secession.

http://usnewsandyou.siterubix.com/how-could-texas-secede/
1
Kevin Fleming's profile photoJames Brown's profile photo
7 comments
 
They do. They have a short history of it and have all the required ingredients. I think the will is the only thing they lack
Add a comment...

Grace Conyers

General Debate  - 
 
I don't really have a stance on this issue, but I wanted to post it here because I wanted to see the different sides of this economics/wage divide debate with regard to this article.

What this article discusses is potential reasons for the sharp wage break in the 1970s that decoupled wages from productivity, thus creating a bit of a problem for our current society.

The article claims it was the a change in our mindset and beliefs that led to this.

The sudden change in the mid-70’s was not economic. First it was moral, then social, then political, ….. then economic.

I can see where the author is coming from. I'd like to hear from some that even grew up in the 70s to weigh in on how things might have changed. This seems like an interesting story as well as a great debate to have. 
In 2002, I heard an economist characterizing this figure as containing a valuable economic insight. He wasn’t sure what the insight was. I have my own answer. The economist talked of the figu…
2
Grace Conyers's profile photoJ. Randolph Steele's profile photo
14 comments
 
+Grace Conyers Your mention of being in the lab at 0300 raises an issue I hadn't fully considered.

I know from my own personal experience as a salaried employee and later as a business owner that working long hours to meet a deadline, or whatever, without "pay", was becoming more common in the mid-70s and continued. Especially in tech start-ups and related businesses.

Thus; while robotics might not have been a factor the rise in technology companies and the common 40hr a week salaries covering 60+ hr work weeks may have been and might still be a sizable factor in the charted disparity. Especially if the same was occurring in other industries.

Thanks for the brain tweak! :-)
Add a comment...

Aman Mourya

General Debate  - 
 
Lets have a debate on life and work. Which one is important?
http://jeevikami.com/importance-of-life-over-work/
2
1
Jason Reynolds's profile photoMary L's profile photo
21 comments
Mary L
 
+Jason Reynolds I didn't claim that you never worked hard in your life, and didn't mean to suggest it. But I did assume you hadn't experienced life on benefits - so you're half right there. It seems my assumption was wrong:-)

I think you are over-generalising - perhaps I was guilty of the same. When people try to argue from extreme viewpoints, they often don't realise that the middle ground can be very similar for them. I agree that there are several people who get out of poverty and off benefits - as you did - and don't doubt that more could do the same. But I think its important to recognise that many others - a very substantial number - aren't able to do that, however hard they try.
Add a comment...
 
Should it be acceptable for parents and guardians to force non-consenting minors to participate in religious events.
Ex:Athiest Teen forced to be baptized by parents and grandparents.

My view on this topic is that no, it should not be acceptable due to the fact it is a form of religious oppression, but I understand where those that say yes are coming from.

As a guardian it's your job to make sure a minor is morally, emotionally, and physically functional. Faith reinforces these functionality. However, it also your job to make sure they are comfortable and confident with themselves, and forcing religions on a person often cause discomfort an insecurity.
9
David Upton's profile photoDavid Coulter's profile photo
106 comments
 
+David Upton 
IT JUST DOESN'T FEEL RIGHT in my mindset to support religious teaching in schools

Wait.... Is that what you've been arguing against this whole time????? Christ... NO ONE ever suggested we teach religious beliefs in school!

We are discussing the right of the parents to teach their own children.
Add a comment...

Jerome Marshall

Politics and Public Policy  - 
 
Should Americans support the Trans Pacific Partnership (TPP)?

Yes, TPP will expand the export of domestic goods and services and support domestic jobs.

Businesses that export tend to hire more and pay more than businesses that do not export. A 2012 study, for example, showed that African-American owned businesses that exported employed an average of 33 workers with compensation averaging $44,016 per worker. In contrast, non-exporting African-American owned businesses employed an average of only eight workers with compensation averaging only $24,750 per worker. Hispanic-owned exporting businesses likewise employed an average of 19 people with compensation averaging $43,880 per worker - non-exporting Hispanic-owned businesses employed an average of eight workers, with compensation averaging $27,060 per worker.
7
Apt215 Melissa Brown's profile photoEric Mueller's profile photo
21 comments
 
+Apt215 Melissa Brown NAFTA is an agreement between North American countries, TPP is primarily with Asian countries. The treaty removes or lessens barriers to trade (tariffs), requires countries to adopt measures to protect the environment, to reduce corruption, end exploitative labor practices such as child labor, crack down on human trafficking, enforce copyright protections, and settle business disputes between countries. Substantively it's not different from NAFTA, although the exact provisions in each treaty differ.
Add a comment...

Abel Dean

Politics and Public Policy  - 
 
Americans want to criminalize human genetic engineering, especially for intelligence. This is a huge error: genetic engineering for intelligence is the one thing that can help solve almost every large-scale problem at the same time, as there is a high correlation between a nation's average IQ and desirability of living in that nation. Intelligent people solve problems and make life better for everyone. And, human genetic engineering won't be stopped if prospective parents can travel to China to do it, and then only the rich will have the supergenes.

Scatterplot IQ data is sourced from Lynn and Vanhanen, GDP per capita data is sourced from the CIA World Factbook, and genetic engineering poll figure is sourced from https://cdn1.sph.harvard.edu/wp-content/uploads/sites/94/2016/01/STAT-Harvard-Poll-Jan-2016-Genetic-Technology.pdf.
6
1
Apt215 Melissa Brown's profile photoDavid Upton's profile photo
8 comments
 
+Steven Neary Agreed about the Yankee god squads. If only one could sneak into the engineering genes program a gene adjustment that takes away the desire to practice religion, especially Christianity and Islam.
I'm sure we'd be all better off.
Add a comment...

Darren Stansbury

Politics and Public Policy  - 
 
Donald Trump has been so reckless throughout his presidential run that I've thought he might be running to show how gullible and exploitable so many voters are.

No one seriously seeking the presidency would make the statements he has he has and be so unprepared for the job.

Maybe he's a closet Democrat seeking to sabotage the GOP's plan to regain the White House and a Congressional majority.

He's not exactly Honest Abe.

Maybe his campaign serves as a mirror to our society showing its warts.

Is Donald Trump for real or is he just trying to make a point about the gullibility of so many voters? 
At 1 p.m. PDT on Thursday, Truthdig Editor in Chief Robert Scheer and his team will sit down with former judge and Truthdig contributor Bill Blum to analyze what’s likely to be next for the GOP candidate. - 2016/08/03
3
Brad McNair's profile photoDarren Stansbury's profile photo
28 comments
 
+Brad McNair​​​​​​ No one is holy or ever has been except Jesus. I think you mean "unsaved," "non-believer" or "secular hedonist" regarding Donald Trump. Yes, a person can be irreligious and still an effective leader.

Where is an Amazon mentioned in the Bible?

Hillary Clinton didn't sell classified information. That would be worse than what she did: carelessly handled it.

As for Donald Trump wanting to protect America what about his coziness with dictators including Vladimir Putin and his suggestion that Russian hackers hack Hillary's email server? 

He claimed the hacking suggestion was a joke. He has a pattern of claiming his statements are jokes AFTER they stir controversy.

I think Trump wants to build his brand, not be elected president, and he makes outrageous statements to lose the presidential bid. However, it's backfired for him. 
Add a comment...

Galen McKibben

Politics and Public Policy  - 
 
Just completed The World Until Yesterday: What Can We Learn from Traditional Societies? by Jared Diamond, author of the Pulitzer Prize winning Guns, Germs, and Steel: The Fates of Human Societies.
My position: I accept Diamond’s answer to his question, “What Can We Learn from Traditional Societies?”, which is “we can learn a great deal”. Each time an indigenous language goes extinct as its last speaker dies, all of humankind suffers the loss of a wealth of social, cultural, spiritual, yes, and even technological wisdom. We should all do everything we can to help nurture and protect indigenous cultures and help keep their languages alive.

6
Galen McKibben's profile photo
66 comments
 
+David Coulter Good analysis. But, in the end, isn’t what you describe here simply how racial prejudice works? And don’t you and I have an obligation to point out that indeed it is not right, it is wrong; and don’t we have an obligation to try to do something about it in as far as we can? You write there is a lot more to it than clear racial bias towards one group, or corporate profit. Yes, and every aspect of the complicated problem you describe is a common characteristic of a racially divided, unfair and self-destructive system. Everything from our failure to adequately fund education to the rise of a Donald Trump... all a part of a flawed cultural economic system. Better than many but deeply flawed nonetheless. And every thoughtful member of this society should be working to mend the flaws.
Add a comment...