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John Kellden
owner

21C Workflow  - 
 
Social Presence: Collaborative Sensemaking

Generative sequence
shared understanding around new and different solution spaces, information gathering, problem solving, solution generation

This sequence, applied to sufficiently well understood and sufficiently operationalizable context, yields strategies with better half-life in networks.

The generative sequence:

shared understanding around new and different solution spaces, information gathering, problem solving, solution generation

can be used in two ways, either starting with shared, shareable understanding, experiential learning towards generating good solutions, or

1. Define our need for different solutions (eg service innovation)
2. Identify the challenges related to this innovation
3. Gather the necessary and sufficient information about the challenges
4. Hold space, eg in immersive sensemaking environments, conducive to shared understanding around the information (shared context, shared meaning, actionable knowledge, momentum, forward movement)

The first approach works well for getting from A to B. The second approach can be used when in need of understanding, A, B or points inbetween.

For those of you in the Conversation Community who are interested in Business (in all its various dimensions) as a possible force for good - you would benefit from following, and better yet, interacting with +Gideon Rosenblatt 

Collaborative Sensemaking
http://goo.gl/x3U7Cl
 
New research out of Harvard Business School has some interesting, and at first, seemingly counter-intuitive, implications for the way we coordinate problem solving with others.

In short, it may help to organize ourselves quite differently for information gathering and for solution generation. Both are important for problem solving, and yet, if we use the same kind of organizational structure for both, we may reduce the diversity of potential solutions from which to choose. 

This is network science put to good use. I've kept this write-up short and succinct (a two-minute read), but it includes a link to the actual paper for more details.

#networks   #collaboration   #problemsolving  

Special thanks to +Chris Sutton and +David Amerland for first calling my attention to this study here on Google+ (just one more example, by the way, of the network's superior ability to discover new information).
New research on problem solving says groups should have tighter connections for information discovery and looser connections for solution generation.
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Frank Gainsford's profile photoJohn Kellden's profile photo
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The generative sequence:

shared understanding around new and different solution spaces, information gathering, problem solving, solution generation

can be used in two ways, either starting with shared, shareable understanding, experiential learning towards generating good solutions, or

1. Define our need for different solutions (eg service innovation)
2. Identify the challenges related to this innovation
3. Gather the necessary and sufficient information about the challenges
4. Hold space, eg in immersive sensemaking environments, conducive to shared understanding around the information (shared context, shared meaning, actionable knowledge, momentum, forward movement)

The first approach works well for getting from A to B. The second approach can be used when in need of understanding, A, B or points inbetween.
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Yvette Dubel

21C Workflow  - 
 
 
Change or not change? Is that the question? 
Now that corporations have won their campaign (in the U.S.) for personhood, can we define the responsibilities and relationship of that “corporate personhood” to those who make up the entity and
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Creativity comes form without
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Karen M
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Great post +Kristina Georgieva!

When I was in the music business a few years ago and shifting through potential songwriters, I remember the refrain: it can't be more than four music measures. That was the how much freedom a same lyric or melody could have before copyright violation was realized. When I'm with my English students, we use Turnitin software to ensure there is no plagiarism, but we want their creativity. 

I understand the need to make a living. Right before the peer-to-peer sharing came about, I remember one country songwriter whose song royalties went from $250,000 for a year to $1,000 the next year. It was blamed on the p2p sharing. Boy, the music business fortified itself for a fight. See what they've done. Fortified themselves out of holding the majority share.

My good students live in fear of violating copyright. And I have to be honest, most teachers are figuring out how to handle the new media available to engage students but fearful of not understanding it or rocking the boat because their living is involved.

How can people be creative when they're limited from using the community? We need to take a look at how we can change attitudes in this. I want to free my students, not make them too handicapped to handle the tasks before them.
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Henk Hadders

Visual Narrative  - 
 
What a day!  And it is Friday as well. Friends loosing their job, a friend who heard she has cancer, and another couple became new parents.....all in one day. I need to collect myself again and to become more quiet...with some music. Here you have The Gypsy Kings with "Volare". 

Gipsy Kings - Volare
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Hoda Maalouf's profile photoHenk Hadders's profile photo
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Thank you +Hoda Maalouf You're right, it was a day of emotions, but that's life they say....nothing ever stays the same, it's always changes..birth...death. So let's just dance to celebrate Life!
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John Kellden
owner

Visual Narrative  - 
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Sakari Maaranen's profile photoDan Oestreich's profile photoPeter Waaben's profile photoBettina Ascaino's profile photo
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what a photograph just wow
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Wisdom of Voyaging People

"There is an ancient saying from the island voyaging tradition that means: 'My canoe (wa'a) is my island (moku), and my island (moku) is my canoe (wa'a).' The voyaging people deeply understood that they would need to cherish and care for (malama) their resources if they were to survive. Setting off on journeys of discovery across vast oceans, they carried with them on their small boats all the resources, plants, animals, and supplies that they would need to settle and sustain themselves on a new island (moku) IF they were fortunate enough to read the subtle signs of the seas and find new lands. Once they did find and settle a new island home, these few precious resources they had cared for at sea in their canoes would now need to be nurtured and cared for as they developed their new home so that the plants and animals they brought with them would propagate to provide food, fiber, shelter, and sustenance for their people and for generations to come. 
   
When Captain Cook and the first Westerners arrived in Hawaii in 1778 they noted in their journals that in all their travels around the world they had never seen a culture that was able to so bountifully provide for and sustain themselves. They marveled at the deep wisdom and attunement to managing and caring for their natural world that allowed these people to live in harmony and balance with the streams of natural resources that were available to them on their islands.
   
Our Hawaiian teachers remind us that our earth is both our island and our canoe, and that if we are to survive, we must learn to better nurture and care for the precious and limited resources that we steward here together.  In the voyaging tradition the vital bond between people who journey together is regarded as a sacred trust and each person has a kuliana - a sense of responsibility to the community (ohana) at large - and each is regarded with respect for their roles within the community. Such wisdom is echoed in the teachings of countless First Nations peoples in indigenous cultures around the globe who sustained themselves for millennia with traditions rooted in living in harmony and balance with their natural world.'

- Excerpted from Joel and Michelle Levey, Living in Balance: A Mindful Guide for Thriving in a Complex World


http://www.wisdomatwork.com
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Living, dynamic balance.

service, synthesis, selfhood

A selfhood characterized by curiosity, inclusivity and convivial agency - what synthesis led to such a character? What quality shining through what service, to Gaia, others and embodied self, led to such synthesis?
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Henk Hadders

21C Resources  - 
 
 
The Real Tragedy of the Commons happens to it, not because of it
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Karen M
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Ahh . . . despite the truth, the stereotype remains.
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Dan Oestreich

Placemaking  - 
 
Communitas

The image is from Acoma, a Native American pueblo atop a mesa not far from Albuquerque, New Mexico.  The pueblo has been occupied for about 800 years, making it one of the oldest continuously inhabited communities in the United States, with tribal traditions estimating residence in the village at 2,000 years.  The word, Acoma, has more than one meaning, but one of those meanings is "the place that always was."

No one would argue that today is a liminal time, a time in-between, a threshold, as the root of the word would suggest, a felt rite of passage perhaps. Rites of passage usually have three parts, if I've got my anthropology right: the first signifying the death of the old, the liminal passage (sometimes a test), while the third is a celebration that announces a reintegration with society (or maybe the reintegration of society.)

Communitas refers to the liminal middle stages of a rite of passage, when normally accepted differences between participants, such as social class or stature, are diminished in favor of a common sense of humanity without hierarchy.  Communitas is unstructured bonding and has both positive qualities (warmth, spontaneity, openness, connection) and also a potential dark side, too. 

Just today I sat with a friend as he poured out a heart full of anguish about the state of the organization he is part of.  The contrast between failing hierarchy (but not yet its death) and his deepening sense of humanity (but no place yet to connect it up within his workplace) could not have been clearer. 

All of us in this community can cherish this time, this here and now form of communitas facilitated by social media.  I feel lucky to be here,  part of this conversation, this open field, while also being mindful that it is the middle passage, not the end.  

While here I believe we can offer our deepest invitations to one another to contribute and also unfold our willingness to help each other as people,  building true relationships while fearlessly exploring ideas.  We can't forget that there are human beings attached to those ideas; that in part the human being (humanity itself) is perhaps the governing idea behind it all.

Why I should write such things today is not entirely clear to me, but something in my friend's suffering touched me. Perhaps it is just that in such a middle time it becomes so much clearer how much we actually need to turn to each other. Maybe that's part of the "test," and a necessary prelude to the emergent celebration.

#communitas   #ritesofpassage   #liminality   #connection   #invitation
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Dan Oestreich's profile photoDavid Hain's profile photoSamantha Hall's profile photo
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+Terry Brown Thank you, Terry. I'm glad you noticed that line about timing.  That's right on. It's easy to hesitate until a post seems perfectly self-contained but then, of course, it (and I) can lose some heart.

The picture is one I took several years ago on a short trip to Albuquerque.  Acoma is a remarkable place and the image seemed to fit well with the messages.  http://goo.gl/7dq998

Here is an image of one of Acoma's current residents who was selling water to the tourists. When asked politely he agreed to a photograph. http://goo.gl/vcLt0b
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John Kellden
owner

Patterns  - 
 
Generativity

Ht +Hans Youngmann
 
"At first glance the work of Australian generative artist Jonathan McCabe might look like biological specimen stained with some psychedelic chemicals for effect, but it’s not biology. He created all of these images using computer algorithms based on a little-known biological theory of how cells randomly grow into patterns and form order amid chaos."

"Turing came up with a basic model of how such natural patterns work. A cell produces chemicals, and those chemicals react and diffuse into their environment of neighboring cells. There’s a compound that activates the reaction, and one that shuts it down, an “inhibitor.” Depending on the concentration of the “activator” chemical in each cell, you might get a spot or a stripe as the reaction diffuses across tissue -- the larger the area, the more complex the pattern."
Artist Jonathan McCabe builds computer programs that create their own art—intricately patterned images that look part organic, part kaleidoscopic
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Thank you to everyone that got in touch, Retweeted, Reposted, and commented on Part One.  Well, here's the conclusion of that article. I'd love to hear from more of you since we're co-creating this adventure together. Thanks +John Kellden  for that reminder :)
Looking for easy answersIt is easy to vilify someone representing the racist, empathize with the victim. But it is also unproductive. It does nothing to move us forward and promote meaningful change.
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+Joshua Stricker  We are not alone...
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About this community

Conversation as an art needs to be rediscovered, rekindled, revitalized. This community will explore how: everything from Google Hangouts to Deep Bohmian Dialogue.

Mara Rose

Visual Narrative  - 
 
I hold the most archaic values on earth ... the fertility of the soul, the magic of the animals, the power-vision in solitude.... the love and ecstasy of the dance, the common work of the tribe.

Gary Snyder

Icelandic Horses, Iceland

#Gaia

photo by Thomas Alsina

http://goo.gl/LxuEMv
https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/
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Axes Monday

Healing the Earth  - 
 
I shared this link elsewhere a few moments ago, and I thought it might be something to share here and see what, if any, conversation may unfold.

Of particular interest, to me, are the various talking points elaborated and sourced below the graph. Is there anyone here who, upon thoughtfully considering those points, believes that anything else we may post about here is 'more important' than the suffering, and even the life-or-death settings, depicted therein?

http://www.globalissues.org/article/26/poverty-facts-and-stats
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Joshua Stricker's profile photoJohn Kellden's profile photoKaren M's profile photo
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Imagine a child being born right this minute - let's call her Eyeless in Gaza, because she is born blind, and in Gaza. Her father died before she was born in an armed conflict, and her mother died from a combination of disease, malnutrition and birth complications.

Little Eyeless has three weeks more to live. Three weeks from now, her already frail immune system, will be wiped out, a result of bacteria in the formula (instead of mothers milk), poor water and sanitation and a bout of the common flu. Three weeks from now, her physical existence is at an end. She is as good as dead already.

Now, are we absolutely sure that we are in a position to judge her as if an inferior spirit having a physical experience. That her life is any less sacred only because we live longer? 

Could it be that her spirit, is already in full understanding of the given three weeks of embodied experience on Gaia, is grateful for these three weeks, knowing that these three weeks is invaluable, as seen from her perspective?

If we are able to let go of relying only on external, materialistic yardsticks, could it be that we would then be in a place, where we would benefit from her gift to us: utter humility and unconditional gratitude towards life itself?

She lived for three weeks, because she was strong enough in spirit, to show us the true meaning of life. The only question then is - what she is embodying, who she is and remains as a living example, what she is showing us -  are we prepared to see? Did she sacrifice her own physical eyes, in vain?

Will our minds remain polarized, blind, even though we were gifted with eyes that can see?
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"If I feel physically as if the top of my head were taken off, I know that is poetry." ― Emily Dickinson

#poetry   #emilydickinson   #passionate  
#coreldraw  (Hoda Maalouf)
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Great initiative in Liverpool on July 24th called World Merit Day.  Led by Chris Arnold, fantastic bunch of young people trying to initiative some positive change around the world.  Please share and encourage people to get involved.  After Malala's superlative talk to the UN in 2013, having her as the keynote is phenomenal. It really brings home the importance that everyone has access to learning and that those who impact their knowledge through their teaching are respected, valued and rewarded!
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John Kellden
owner

Introductions  - 
 
A Big Wecome to All 1006 Conversationalists

Our son is turning 21 today. I thought there should be cake for the Conversation Community members as well. You need to help yourself to your preferred poison, tea or coffee, to go with.
 
Zen of Small Tasks: Following Recipes

I'm attending the shenanigans. Normal services will resume soonish. Meanwhile, there will be cake.

Image:   http://goo.gl/vy6rPo
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Becky Coleman's profile photoAxes Monday's profile photo
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I remember that day. I still felt young. When they reached 31, I realized I was no longer feeling so young. Wonder how my parents felt when I turned 61? Haha hahaha! Gotta love it!
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John Kellden
owner

Metalogue  - 
 
21C: Development of Trust and Translucency of Ego

Death of the Old
First, we go through what might be called "a period of undoing." This need not be painful, but it usually is so experienced. It seems as if things are being taken away, and it is rarely understood initially that their lack of value is merely being recognized.
http://goo.gl/czxHhg

A Series of Tests
Next we go through "a period of sorting out." This is always somewhat difficult because, having learned that the changes in our lives are always helpful, we must now decide all things on the basis of whether they increase the helpfulness or hamper it.

The Quest
In order to make our journey, from Karma Village, up on Epiphany Mountain, and Back Again, through

service, synthesis, selfhood

we need to relinquish, to let go, anything that impedes our movement.

Zen and the Art of Thrivability Maintenance
The moments of pause throughout life, is for reflexivity. When truly important things happen, we are meant to notice and reflect. Particularly when we are coming back down from the Mountain, we need to discern, when to walk the path, and when to rest and realize virtue. 

Convivial Collisions of Serendipituous Encounters
The last leg of the journey is all about serendipity, to stay our path even in the midst of seemingly more crowded, more travelled paths as we approach the Village, as if for the first time.

21C Placemaking: Essential Character and Evolutionary Purpose
The crowning achievement, is all about offering ourselves, our seed of transformation, our essential gift, ourselves, making a difference in the Village Square.

There's two nested processes, twirling their way through the above six stages:

trust, translucency of ego

Trust is all about a sufficiently deep understanding of We, a shared understanding, collective intelligence in action, scenius.

Translucency of ego is all about forgiving our own perception, until we see things clearly, until we achieve that which we were called to become and do.

Together, these two processes, the development of trust and the redisovery of perception, is the intentional, conscious, willing, celebration of life.
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+Joachim Stroh "Yes, Michael, this works."
Thank you. 
I know. :8~)

Richard Strauss tribute to Nietzsche is great. the entire operette.
to detect the real sycnhronicity, one has to know the book.
the book for all and none.
may be, you know it already.
#ThePath  
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Colin Kilburn

21C Workflow  - 
 
How do you do Google Art?
 
See what can happen when you get the dream you can fly .... Ozzy and Rich are two examples from a different pile  ... love them both .. stratospheric guys ... 

Wanna fund a  .... a ... dream machine / engine game ... AN understander tool ... for the (muted?) people who need to count ... #4better  

#bettercommunitytools  

..... and a .... +Ozzy Osbourne 
..... and a .... +Richard Dawkins Foundation for Reason and Science 
..... and a .... +Richard Branson of course ...

Long Live Rock and Roll baby ...    
Inc.com
What Virgin Group's founder has learned about working with regulators.
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Our original vision for the net was passive and agnostic. No agenda. Shirky once jokingly framed it as akin to a table, around which those seated at its edges were the real action. But now we see that this vision of our tools was perhaps too hopeful, and that in fact the table now has an agenda for our conversations.  

The revelation that Facebook is something of a World Wide Skinner Box, routinely conducting behavioral-modification experiments on its unknowing members and then incorporating the results of those experiments into the algorithms that determine the shape of its members’ conversations, tells us how naive we were to look at social-networking platforms as high-tech versions of tables and to believe that the Net had a “commitment” to push social interaction to its edges. Facebook, and every other large social-networking and information-aggregation company, both convenes and intervenes. Indeed, it convenes in order to intervene. The platform is the conversation. To fully analyze online social dynamics, one has to attend not only to the tension between the group and the individual but between the platform and both the group and the individual. The problem is that whereas the group-individual tension is visible, the manipulations of the platform are invisible. With the publication of the Facebook study, the veil trembled. We all knew the veil was there — we all knew we were inside a Skinner Box — but suddenly we had to admit the fact.

HT +Alex Schleber 
"Prior to the Internet, the last technology that had any real effect on the way people sat down and talked together was the table," observed Clay Shirky in a 2003 speech. One thing you can say abou...
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Teodora Petkova's profile photoGrizwald Grim's profile photoBettina Ascaino's profile photoGideon Rosenblatt's profile photo
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Thanks +Alex Schleber - saw that but haven't digested it yet. By the way, you should take a look at the piece I just posted on algorithms and journalism. It makes some of the points you continue to hammer on. 
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John Kellden
owner

Placemaking  - 
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Axes Monday's profile photoVicky Gallardo's profile photo
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Thank you, +John Kellden, for sharing this. I am glad that the post inspired the deep conversation that unfolded above and thank you, +Axes Monday and +Doug Breitbart for your sentiments that are very much inline with my own. 

I stumbled upon +Mitchell Sipus who wrote the brilliant piece quite by accident, and was taken with his passion for humanitarianism and his insights from the front line of conflict zones. Please see this post I wrote a while back (http://goo.gl/bY5ANR) to learn more about Mr. Sipus and his efforts to rebuild war torn countries and improve refugee conditions: 

If we are very fortunate, he will join the conversaton; he sometimes pops in to provide clarification and further insights when I share his posts. However the last I saw of him was a video he posted of himself on a boat somewhere in Somalia.

In the meantime, please check the information on my post linked above and by all means circle +Mitchell Sipus and his blog page, +Humanitarian Space so that you can follow his efforts.
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Diagon Alley
 
This looks so cool!

Walking Tour Of Diagon Alley In The Wizarding Wor…: http://youtu.be/79j1Z0SeGYU
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Becky Coleman's profile photo
 
I may not be a fan, exactly, but do appreciate attention to detail. And, a good ride.
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