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In our most recent leg of our Titus Canyon journey, we make it to the beginning of Red Pass. We see some geology, including some Titus Canyon Formation, along the way!
We've gone over White Pass—btw, here's a gigapan looking west from White Pass—and we've gone across the flats in the east fork of upper Titanothere Canyon. The road has become a fairly normal dirt road, and although it's still a little narrow, there are places to pull over, or pass, ...
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Russ George

Climate Change  - 
 
So many are in a state of eco-grief as nothing but doom and gloom seems to be presented over how to save our world. Bureaucrats, politicians, and pundits all have as their goal to raise $3.4 trillion in carbon taxes every year to pay them to seek solutions. Don't despair, here's what will be done immediately. http://russgeorge.net/2016/06/27/restoring-10-ocean-amazon-rainforests-just-5-years/
Restoring 10 Ocean Amazon Pastures Naturally Cures Our CO2 Crisis Cheaper, Better, & Faster than other solutions to save our blue planet and feed the hungry
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Bob Libra

Sed-Strat-Surficial Geo  - 
 
Fore!
Excavation crews have removed 25,000 truckloads of rock and soil at the Top of the Rock sinkhole, which is now 100 feet deep and is destined to become a tourism draw, according to Bass Pro Shops officials.
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Tim Chambers's profile photoBob Libra's profile photo
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Maybe they are a standard unit of measure on golf courses! I think they use a mix of packing, mainly FCC, while hooking in a slice of HCP. That would be a fair way ;)
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Russ George

Paleontology  - 
 
Modern man invented civilization and became Earths' scientists when we developed agricuture and began caring for pastures, it is time we began caring for our ocean pastures When mankind first developed agriculture, caring for pastures, his mind became expanded and we became different from the animals, the oceans are dying due to our wanton disregard for their needs and ours. http://russgeorge.net/2016/06/25/time-bring-agricultural-attitudes-civilization-oceans/
The birth of agriculture defines human history—the turning point that led to civilization, it is time we bring civilization to the oceans and their pastures
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moreover, when one man decided he could bully another into doing his work for him, and then locked up all the food so everyone had to work to get it back...

"Putting food under lock and key was one of the great innovations of your culture. No other culture in history has ever put food under lock and key - and putting it there is the cornerstone of your economy.[...] Because if the food wasn't under lock and key... who would work?" - Daniel Quinn, Ishmael.
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Spider Gregory (Spider Gji)

Hydro-Environmental  - 
 
Interactions between the Caribbean basin and oceanic Rossby waves combine to produce what must be one of the strangest sonic phenomena in nature.    
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todd comer's profile photoBob Libra's profile photo
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Jimmy Buffett.
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Anders Lorenzen

Climate Change  - 
 
Experts warns it would be a setback for tackling climate change if Britain were to leave the EU:
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todd comer's profile photo
 
Experts?
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Here we make it from Tan Mountain to White Pass, seeing some Cambrian and Tertiary rocks, on our way into Titus Canyon:
Getting past Tan Mountain on the trip down the Titus Canyon road always feels like a milestone to me, not so much because the road gets better—it maybe does get better, for a while, or maybe I just get used to the washboard—but because I've finally made it past the Amargosa Desert into the ...
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M Jacobs's profile photoSandra Powers's profile photo
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Thanks, +M Jacobs!
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Russ George

Climate Change  - 
 
Lets keep our heads in the clouds it is our best hope http://russgeorge.net/2016/06/20/earths-clouds-keep-us-cool-but-our-clouds-in-danger/
Natural and human aerosols make the clouds that keep our planet in the Goldilocks Zone, our clouds are in danger as ocean aerosols are decimated
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M Jacobs

Funny Stuff  - 
 
The perfect West Texas Vehicle
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Stephen Miner's profile photoM Jacobs's profile photo
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Hahaha....I have seen it done...we were in there one night after a long day of field work and we saw a guy do it with about 5 minutes to spare.  There was a 120 pound lady who ate two of them in an hour....admittedly she was a pro and does power eating in contests...but that is a remarkable feat. 
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todd comer

Geoblogs  - 
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Please read the community guidelines before posting: http://bit.ly/11qsoxE Geoscience is the study of the Earth from a variety of aspects, and includes sciences such as geology, paleontology, oceanography, meteorology, geography, planetary geology, and others. Many issues in our world today rely on geoscience, such as earthquakes & other natural hazards, natural resources, environmental issues, land use, climate change, and many others. This is a public community. Anyone can join; all posts are public and can be found in Google Search.
Earth & other planets

M Jacobs

Field Trips & Guides  - 
 
Bal Gangadhar Tilakan, the legendary Indian nationalist, teacher, social reformer, lawyer and independence activist wrote in The Arctic Home in the Vedas: “The geologist takes up the history of the earth at the point where the archaeologist leaves it, and carries it further back into remote antiquity.”
 
Now…. I am not one to take exception with Bal Gangadhar Tilaken and to what he said, after all he is a great historical figure…however in the field of geo-archaeology the geologist takes up looking at various cultures and civilizations to unravel and understand the role that natural resources, i.e., geology, geomorphology, climate, etc., played a part in the sustainable development choices and in the daily lives of prehistoric cultures.
 
 
Before I took up geology as my true chosen profession and passion I was very interested in archaeology and minored in the subject in undergraduate school.  I worked several summers in the field doing various geo-archaeological studies for the Paleo-Indian Institute at Eastern New Mexico University under the tutelage of my mentor and friend Fred Nials.  Most of this work was along the Rio Puerco de la Este, in Central New Mexico where there were hundreds of Anasazi (“The Ancient Ones”) ruins.  And I spent the summer between my undergrad work and grad school as the Site Geologist at Salmon Ruins, a Chaco ruin in Northwest, New Mexico.  I then began doing petrographic analyses of the tempering material used in pre-historic Indian pottery and helped support my way through undergraduate and graduate school doing this for the Cultural Resources Management Division and NMSU and for the Centennial Museum at UTEP.
 
 
Before all this school...my interest in archaeology was largely driven by the fact that I grew up in Clovis, New Mexico just a few miles from the Blackwater Draw site where spear points of Alibates flint was found embedded in skeletons of Mammoths.  I actually worked there for one semester before I was invited by the President of the United States to join in a little soiree he had going on in SE Asia (Vietnam).  Upon return from this interesting hiatus in my life I returned to my studies and found geology a good addition to my interest in archeology and I developed a lifelong passion for geology eventually majoring in geology. 
 
Anyway, a good example of how geology is used is in studying the resources used by the earliest paleo-indians for their tools, in particular the material used for spear points.
 
The rest of this post is dedicated to looking at some of the beautiful Alibates flint as well as the Edwards Limestone Cherts (the same Edwards Limestones that the ammonites in my post come from).  
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David Carlson's profile photoM Jacobs's profile photo
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Well...I am not totally familiar with East Coast geology, but I am willing to wager that there are no comparable rocks to be found east of the Appalachians...probably not there either; albeit, I believe that there are dolomitic rocks in the early Paleozoic along the Appalachian belt, and many probably contain chert...nothing like these rocks though.
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M Jacobs

Paleontology  - 
 
Well.....the hunting was good...but the results were not as good as I had hoped...several got away.  I found four excellent specimens; however, I spent a lot of the day dodging severe weather.  Consider this.....sitting out in the middle of a quarry during a thunderstorm with rock hammers, chisels, pry bars, etc., is a sure recipe for a Sunday afternoon BBQ....
I did however get one specimen out before I figured out if I was going to get out of the quarry...even with my trusty FJ....I better get after it.  I partially excavated the other three...I know where they are and I'll be going back soon.
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M Jacobs's profile photoJude Rejoice's profile photo
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What is it? 
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M Jacobs

Paleontology  - 
 
It has been too long since I visited my "honeyhole" for Cretaceous Ammonites...so....I am headed out tomorrow to do some more hunting...
I'll post my finds (if I have any) in another post.  In the meantime...here are the results of some of my previous hunts.
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Awsome post
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Local wind events often lift particles into the atmosphere, where it affects the mechanisms of our climate. Now, scientists at PNNL have developed a new method to represent small-scale, localized wind events that is computationally efficient in global models. When researchers considered local wind events in a global climate model, they found two surprising results: In some cases, the amount of annual dust increased by more than 50 percent. In others, the annual mean remained the same, but the amount of dust raised by weaker winds was higher. Learn more about this global climate dust simulation research at http://goo.gl/OYth0m. 
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Scientists have discovered an often ignored but very influential process that can affect more than just the air we breathe. It affects our weather and climate. Research identified oligomerization – a process that causes smaller molecules to combine and form larger molecules – as the most influential process affecting secondary organic aerosol-forming in the atmosphere. Learn more about this PNNL-led research at http://goo.gl/xiM4Pf.
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Wikiplacemarks

Min-Pet-Geochem  - 
 
Placemark of the day: Fly Geyser accidentally created by well drilling geothermal flat here http://www.wikiplacemarks.com/map.php?id=166599
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the site for the year around "burning Man" 
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M Jacobs

Funny Stuff  - 
 
Stopped in this Pizza Place in Traverse City, Michigan....the reason is obvious...besides the fact that they had cold, cold, beer
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Bob Libra's profile photoM Jacobs's profile photo
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No doubt Gondwanaland and Laurasia will be at war forever
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Chert nodules in the Ely Limestone of eastern Nevada, with one of cannonball size:
In the 1950s and 1960s, R. A. Breitrick and J. E. Welsh described the detailed stratigraphy of the Ely Limestone in the area of Ely and the Robinson mining district (with Breitrick, at least, continuing to work in the area to this day). They divided the formation into mappable units, ...
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I have some pics of some chert nodules in the Cretaceous Edwards....widely used by Clovis culture for lithic materials in West and South Texas...I'll post them soon. 
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Wikiplacemarks

Structure-Tectonics  - 
 
Placemark of the day: Zanclean flood 5.33 Ma Mediterranean filled w/ H2O from Atlantic here http://www.wikiplacemarks.com/map.php?id=185613
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Olivier Malinur's profile photoWikiplacemarks's profile photo
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thanks for sharing - very interesting.
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