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Hey hey hey guys! Long time no see. Sorry for being so inactive but here's my first post in a long time.

What do YOU think about the comet landing? What do you think we can learn from the comet? In my opinion it was very interesting and it may offer insight on our very distant past.

http://www.oregonlive.com/pacific-northwest-news/index.ssf/2014/11/science_roundup_nov_23.html

Another announcement. Lets have people be more active. It isn't new years yet, but I promise to be more active as one of my resolutions for the next year.

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As seen on #Cosmos: Meteors

Shooting stars, or meteors, are bits of interplanetary material falling through Earth's atmosphere and heated to incandescence by friction. These objects are called meteoroids as they are hurtling through space, becoming meteors for the few seconds they streak across the sky and create glowing trails.

Scientists estimate that 44 tonnes (44,000 kilograms, about 48.5 tons) of meteoritic material falls on the Earth each day. Several meteors per hour can usually be seen on any given night. Sometimes the number increases dramatically - these events are termed meteor showers. Some occur annually or at regular intervals as the Earth passes through the trail of dusty debris left by a comet. Meteor showers are usually named after a star or constellation that is close to where the meteors appear in the sky. Perhaps the most famous are the Perseids, which peak around 12 August every year. Every Perseid meteor is a tiny piece of the comet Swift-Tuttle, which swings by the Sun every 135 years. Other meteor showers and their associated comets are the Leonids (Tempel-Tuttle), the Aquarids and Orionids (Halley), and the Taurids (Encke). Most comet dust in meteor showers burns up in the atmosphere before reaching the ground; some dust is captured by high-altitude aircraft and analyzed in NASA laboratories.

Chunks of rock and metal from asteroids and other planetary bodies that survive their journey through the atmosphere and fall to the ground are called meteorites. Most meteorites found on Earth are pebble to fist size, but some are larger than a build-ing. Early Earth experienced many large meteorite impacts that caused extensive destruction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
#meteor #meteorite #nasa #space

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USGS scientists suggest that underground caves could hold the secret to life on Mars. 

on June 23 a "supermoon" shall be seen

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Nuclear-Fission Rockets, interesting idea that may solve rocket fuel problems and time for travel.

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