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Daniel Wyrzykowski

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“Shocking experiment reveals the condition of our society!” Such a headline is usually tied to articles describing Dr. John Calhoun ’s behavior experiments. Obviously, there’s a reason for that. Among other things, the concl...
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Alan Richards

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Scientific American Reader: Children with a Religious Upbringing Show Less Altruism. http://google.com/newsstand/s/CBIwiJb40iM
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First of all, the test involved 5 to 12 year olds. Of course they're going to be less altruistic. They're 5 to 12! The most selfish age range in our entire life span! To be completely unbiased, test adults! See how they developed. Second, the fact that they couldn't support enough candidates for other religions besides Christianity and Islam means that it's not a very thorough research. Basically, they took children from 2 religions and classified an entire spectrum of people involved in "religion."
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Jeffrey Rubin

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If you want to improve how you get along with people, one of the most powerful skills to learn is the "Signaling to Back Off Technique." http://www.frominsultstorespect.com/2013/07/21/anger-stress-and-the-signaling-to-back-off-technique/
While taking my conflict resolution class, Sara, a young woman around thirty, asked the following: “I have been finding many of my new conflict resolution skills very helpful. However, to my dism…
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Daniel Wyrzykowski

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Well, kind of. Shy people, and people with confidence problems, do not generally lack self-esteem. In fact, they tend to have the opposite problem—they have an inflated sense of their own importance! I first encountered this ...
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Kenny Chaffin

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I learned something tonight watching a TV show (American Experience - The Perfect Crime) that is the term Alienist which was apparently the name for Psychologists/Psychiatrists in those days - 1920's. I'd never heard the term despite having studied undergraduate psychology for 4 years and having a life-long and on-going interest in the field


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alienist

"Alienist is an archaic term for a psychiatrist or psychologist. Despite falling out of favor by the middle of the twentieth century, it received renewed attention when used in the title of the 1994 novel The Alienist by Caleb Carr.

Although currently not often used, the term "alienist" is still used in psychiatric hospitals to describe those mental health professionals who evaluate defendants to determine their competency to stand trial. ..."
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Jeffrey Rubin

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When anger and stress is starting to get to us and we are feeling stuck about how to handle it, here's a little tool that can help us to become unstuck: http://www.frominsultstorespect.com/2013/07/28/anger-stress-and-utilizing-the-chronic-stressors-scale/
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Jeffrey Rubin

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Recently I provided a post titled "Insults: A Comic Strip Lover's Guide." One of the main reasons some throw an insult at us is because they have a conflict with us and they lack skills to maturely resolve conflicts. Here's a fun post designed to begin to remedy this: http://www.frominsultstorespect.com/2012/11/03/conflict-a-comic-strip-lovers-guide/  
In an early post on this blog I discussed the fact that often the reason why people might call you a name, insult or tease you is that they have a conflict with you (see the posts titled DIG FOR TH…
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Anna Ulyanova's profile photoArpita Maity's profile photoMeha Khanduri's profile photoAura Vazeou's profile photo
 
Love this take on conflict; thanks!
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Tony Trucano

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Although the Myers Briggs has more basis than the zodiac calendar, I believe they are both fruit. Meaning they leave much into interpretation and one could easily assimilate into one or the other. 
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Or that the MBTI is a flawed instrument assessing proclivities that are better assayed by the NEO-PI.

As for astrology, there is no real evidence for its predictability, beyond the Barnum effect that is.
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Supriya Radhakrishnan

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Why some people are so crazy to dominate @co-workers and wanted to rule them only with their decisions +work place​.

Isn’t it kind of silly to think that tearing someone else down builds you up?

Omg foolish pranks and the hell all these... 😮😕👊
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3 comments
 
My injuries are a product of that "ethic" at home.
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Hanan Parvez

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If you ignore this post, the flying spaghetti monster will do a belly dance on your bed this midnight.
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Sga G S

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Punishment as per laws should be modified
Based on psychology

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Anna LeMind

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Psychologists have developed a list of five signs so you can identify whether or not you enjoy being unhappy. Are you recognising any of these signs?
Psychologists have developed a list of five signs so you can identify whether or not you enjoy being unhappy. Are you recognising any of these signs?
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Kenny Chaffin

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Is it really a fine line between genius and insanity or are they just outliers, different thinkers, more focused than the rest?
There’s a fine line, it is said, between genius and insanity. But do the two always go hand in hand? In her new book, “Andy Warhol Was a Hoarder,” Claudia Kalb examines 12 historic figures through ...
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Andre Amorim's profile photoDebbie Charles's profile photoSeagull B's profile photoStefan ANGELA-ANDREEA's profile photo
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No, they were highly intelligent, and with that goes a sensitivity to the particularly complex business of being a living human being
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Omer Hameed

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Don't lose hope.
 
There is always hope.
You have the ability to experience sobriety and work your way back from the edge to recovery.
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Muhammad Talha Bin Yousuf

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Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) is a widely accepted classification system throughout the world. Two opposing views exist for DSM: first is that it provides help in diagnosing mental disorders. Second is that it strongly labels individuals with terms that shatter their social identities as human beings. Which view point do you agree with?and why? any example?
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Jeferson Pires's profile photo
48 comments
 
+Manny Calderari​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​ My question was actually an exercise of humanity.

How many of us have already seen a psychologist or psychiatrist? How many of us have already started any process of self understanding? Otherwise, how many of us are, at this moment, diagnosing and treating individuals without having started our own process of self understanding?

Hypocricy (????)

How can I help others individuals without knowing (proper) myself? By following books and professors??

I'd call it as "argumentum ad verecundiam".

Try taking a look at the way you understand the relation between patient + "mental" + illnesses, and observe how it biases your speech (and your practice).

"patients WHO ARE mentally ill"

"someone WHO IS bipolar rather than schizophrenic"

"utilize drugs to HELP ENSURE MENTAL STABILITY "

"who HAS schizo-affective disorder"

"Labelling a client or person BY THEIR DISORDER"

Firstly, in your speech, there's a belief that someone HAS a condition x, y or z. I say belief cause there ain't no proof that such conditions are real characteristics. Clients that are diagnosed, usually, just match some conditions. There ain no x-ray, laboratory exame that show any disease within "patient's self", in spite there are some research showing brain images.

But where (in the brain, mind, whatever) are the signature of the disorder???

Are the verbs (to have, to be) ok for representing suffering?? What about issues like brain plasticity and

https://l.facebook.com/l.php?u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.helsinki.fi%2Fneurosci%2Fgroups%2Fcastren.html&h=IAQEJcrSK

Is a disorder something that we have? Any proof of that??? Aren't you confusing diagnosis for cancer (which is on body) and for mental illnesses (which is in the MIND)?

What is exactly what we call "mind"? An analogy for brain?? For self?? For what???

How can I diagnose and treat MINd issues without knowing what/ where it is? Do I believe in statistics?? Kappa stuff??? Placebo effect???

What about effect size in psychiatric research??

Are research in neuroscience and psychiatry same??

Second there's a belief that there's a proper medication for each of such "mental" conditions. Sorry man, there is not and also there are different dosages for different patients (with same conditions) and in different moments of therapy.

Also, patient's conditions aren't only "mental". They also involve social, familiar, cultural, transgerational (and on and on) issues.

It's a bit more complex process than just diagnosing and medicating a patient.

Is it possible to treat (heal) someone from society, from itself or from nurturing ??

Take a look at this following picture. It may help to reflect.

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/2/25/Andry_tree.png

Third, suddenly you said that the medication will HELP obtaining mental stability. Observe that you've changed the track in here, once your speech wasn't the same from bottom to top. You said at the beginning that the person HAS the condition, and then you said the medication will affect mental stability (patient's mental state).

What are (we) talking about?

Docility-utility??? Docile bodies???

Would such stability, caused by medication, be a guarantee that the patient's emotions won't be exacerbated? Is that what you mean by STABILITY?

What does statistics say about it?????? Do you have any argument?

If yes, who said it? And who said it is important to clients?

Are we just following the flow and playing with our clients, in the name of science ???

Would such mental stability (that according to you is caused by medication) be a condition for persons to think in a clearer manner about their conditions of life or personal issues? If yes, would this moment within therapy be the "cherry on top" (????)..

Oops... Are we changing the track in here again?

What a mishmash, man!!!!

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ernest flowers

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Will lack of self loving due to absorbing pain ignorantly kill your character?
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I find we're making some confusion between the concepts of pain and suffering in here. It's worth taking a look at both concepts on proper dictionaries.
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Shibu Thomas

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hey, would anybody be interested in reading a screenplay about schizophrenia, and giving a review?
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Geri O'Neill

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Jealousy and Envy: Roadblocks to Happiness and Success  
http://bit.ly/1nVSiHi
Inferiority and inadequacy are at the root of jealousy and envy. They diminish people and destroy relationships.
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Omer Hameed

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Read these positive outcomes for those young adults in the treatment center.
 
It will come as no surprise to anyone familiar with substance abuse recovery that the numbers of young people in treatment are growing.
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